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Full text of "Digest of administrative reports to the Governor"

Digest of 

Connecticut Administrative Reports 

to the Governor 




la.t\n\cr (^ee 



Lowell P Weicker, Jr. 
Governor 



Vol. XLVI 
1991-92 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/digest92unse 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

DIGEST 

of 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
REPORTS 

to the 

GOVERNOR 
1991-92 

Volume XLVI 



Published at 
HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 



November 1992 



Published under the direction 

of 

Reginald J. Smith 

Commissioner 

Department of Administrative Services 




Compiled and edited by the 

Department of Administrative Services' 

Communications Unit 

Beth S. Merk 
Editor 



William K. Seymour 

Director 
Communications Unit 



About the Cover 

The Latimer Reef lighthouse is from a collection 
drawings of historic lighthouses by Connecticut artist 
Kathy Coogan. 

Ms. Coogan studied at Connecticut College Art Stu- 
dents League and at Middlesex Community College. 
She displays her paintings , lighthouse posters and lim- 
ited edition prints at shows throughout New England 
and at her gallery in Clinton, Connecticut. 




Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. 
Governor 




Lowell P. Weicker Jr. 
GOVERNOR 

STATE OF CONNECTICUT 

EXECUTIVE CHAMBERS 

HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 



November 1992 



This is the 46th edition of the Connecticut Digest of Adminis- 
trative Reports to the Governor. It comes at a time when state 
agencies confront one of the most challenging times Connecticut 
state government has encountered. 

These reports tell of the extrodinary jobs state agencies and their 
staffs have done under difficult circumstances. Agencies explain 
how they are continuing to meet their responsibilities with fewer 
dollars and fewer staff as government reaches to meet the demands 
of a leaner economy. 

The digest is also worthwhile reading for any student of state 
government. This compendium of activities gives a clear indica- 
tion of the mission and goals agencies pursue in their efforts to 
serve the public. Since it was mandated in 1947 by the General 
Assembly, the digest has been a useful historical record and 
dependable source of information. 

Agencies and their staffs deserve a hearty thanks for the work 
done to keep Connecticut state government serving and helping 
people. 



Sincerely, 





Table of Contents 

Introduction 

The Honorable Lowell P. 

Weicker Jr., Governor 5 

Legisltive Agencies 7 

Elected State Officials 11 

Policy and Management 31 

Administrative Services 105 

Motor Vehicles 121 

Revenue Services 127 

Banking 133 

Insurance 137 

Labor 145 

Public Safety 

and Related Services 155 

Consumer Protection 

and Related Services 169 

Correction 

and Related Services 181 

Children and Youth 191 

Economic Development 199 

Health Services 203 

Mental Retardation 219 

Mental Health 223 

Transportation 243 

Environmental Protection 255 

Agriculture 269 

Income Maintenance 275 

Human Resources 

and Related Services 281 

Aging 297 

Higher Education 303 

Education 319 

Housing 333 

Public Works 337 

Veterans' Affairs 341 

Criminal Justice 345 

Index 347 




LEGISLATIVE 
AGENCIES 



Joint Committee on Legislative Management 

DAVID B. OGLE, Executive Director 

J. Peter Waldron, Assistant Director 

Established - 1969 Statutory authority - Chap. 18A 

Central office - Room 5100, Legislative Office Building, 

Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 318 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $28,063,274 

Capital outlay - $177,363 

Capitol Restoration - $37,017 

• 

The Joint Committee on Legislative Management serves as the administrative arm of the 
legislative branch of the state government. It is responsible for managing all legislative affairs 
and activities and for overseeing the organization, operations, facilities and working conditions of the 
General Assembly. 

All funds appropriated for the General Assembly and for legislative-branch agency operations and 
activities are under the jurisdiction of the Legislative Management Committee. The committee is 
responsible for all legislative personnel matters, including the approval of employee compensation 
schedules, the appointment of nonpartisan employees, the administration of the committee's highly 
praised minority recruitment program (a key aspect of the committee's affirmative action plan), and 
coordination of the work of the General Assembly's standing and interim committees. The committee 
is also responsible for the administration, supervision, security and maintenance of the State Capitol 
Building and Legislative Office Building and their surrounding grounds and parking facilities and for 
oversight of the legislative day care facility located at 450 Broad Street in Hartford. During 1991- 
92 enrollment at the daycare facility increased to 68. During the fiscal year, the committee received 
a gift of $100,000 from the Alexander A. Goldfarb Memorial Trust Fund that enabled it to restore 
Hartford's Minuteman Park located just west of the Legislative Office Building on the corner of 
Capitol Avenue and Broad Street. 

Under the committee's supervision are the following staff offices: ( 1 ) Legislative Commissioners' 
Office, Robert G. Jaekle and Karen M. Flanagan, legislative commissioners, and Norma Kloten, 
director of legal services; (2) Office of Legislative Research, L. Allan Green, director; (3) Office of 
Fiscal Analysis, Ralph J. Caruso, director; (4) Office of Program Review and Investigations, Michael 
L. Nauer, director; (5) Office of the Law Revision Commission, David D. Biklen, director; Data 
Processing Division, Nicholas Tomassone, director; and (6) Office of State Capitol Police, Sergeant 
Anthony Murphy, chief. Also under the committee's direction are the Senate and House Clerks' 
Offices, the Connecticut Commission on Uniform Legislation, the Permanent Commission on the 
Status of Women, and the Commission on Children. The Commission on Preservation and 
Restoration of the Capitol is placed under the committee's jurisdiction for administrative purposes. 

The Joint Committee on Legislative Management consists of eleven members of the Senate and 
fifteen members of the House of Representatives, as follows: The President Pro Tempore of the 
Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives as co-chairmen; the Majority Leader and the 
Minority Leader of each chamber; a Deputy Majority Leader of the Senate designated by the Majority 
Leader; four other senators designated by the President Pro Tempore; an Assistant Minority Leader 
of the Senate designated by the Minority Leader; and two other senators designated by the Senate 
Minority Leader; the Deputy Speakers, and Deputy Majority Leaders of the House of Representa- 
tives; three other House members designated by the Speaker; an Assistant Minority Leader of the 
House designated by the Minority Leader; and four other House members designated by the Minority 
Leader. 

Senate members of the Committee during the 1991-92 fiscal year were as follows: John B . Larson, 
president pro tempore, co-chairman; Cornelius O' Leary, majority leader; Margaret E. Morton, deputy 
president pro tempore; Amelia P. Mustone, deputy majority leader; Kevin P. Johnston, deputy 
majority leader; William A. DiBella; Joseph H. Harper Jr.; M. Adela Eads, minority leader; Thomas 
F. Upson, minority leader pro tempore; George L. Gunther, deputy minority leader; and Lawrence J. 



LEGISLATIVE AGENCIES 



Bettencourt, assistant minority leader. 

House members of the committee during the 1991-92 fiscal year were as follows: Richard J. 
Balducci, speaker; Robert F. Frankel, majority leader; Janet Polinsky, deputy speaker; Dean P. 
Markham, deputy speaker; Naomi K. Cohen, deputy majority leader; Jonathan Pelto, deputy majority 
leader; Reginald G. Beamon, assistant majority leader; William R. Dyson; John J. Lescoe; Edward 
C. Krawiecki, Jr., minority leader; Richard O. Belden, deputy minority leader; M. Jodi Rell, deputy 
minority leader; Glenn Arthur; Richard Foley; and Dorothy K. Osier. 

Auditors of Public Accounts 

HENRY J. BECKER, JR. and LEO V. DONOHUE, State Auditors 

Dominick G. Arienzale and Robert J. Hilliard, Deputy State Auditors 

Established -1662 Statutory authority - Chap. 23 

Central office - State Capitol, Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full- time employees - 93 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $4,526,687 

Capital outlay - $16,549 

Organization structure - Central Office Division and Field Audit Division 

• 

Central Office Division 

The Auditors of Public Accounts are required by statute to audit the accounts of each agency of 
the state government and of all institutions supported by the state. They are also authorized to 
examine the operations and performance of state agencies to determine their effectiveness in 
achieving their legislative purposes. 

In accordance with law, they must report any unauthorized, illegal, irregular or unsafe handling or 
expenditure of state funds to the governor, the state comptroller, the clerk of each House, the 
Legislative Program Review and Investigations Committee and the attorney general. Under the 
provisions of Section4-6 1 dd, known as the Whistle Blower Act, the auditors also report to the attorney 
general their findings and recommendations in connection with whistle blower complaints as well as 
with their review of matters of corruption, unethical practices, violation of state laws or regulations, 
mismanagement, gross waste of funds, abuse of authority or danger to the public safety occurring in 
any state agency. At the request of the attorney general or on their own initiative, they shall assist in 
any resultant investigation. 

Audits of Connecticut municipalities are carried out primarily by independent public accountants 
under the provisions of Conn. Gen. Statutes Chap. Ill (Municipal Auditing Act). Such audits must 
be performed in accordance with standards adopted by the secretary of the Office of Policy and 
Management by regulation and approved by the Auditors of Public Accounts. In addition, the 
accounts of all public or quasi-public bodies, politic and corporate, created by public or special act 
of the General Assembly and not subject to audit under the Municipal Auditing Act, are subject to 
audit by the Auditors of Public Accounts. They are also authorized to examine the records and 
accounts of any town and any town or regional board of education in connection with any grant made 
by any state agency pursuant to any section of the General Statutes or any act of the General Assembly, 
are provided access to all records and accounts of public or private agencies receiving state grants, 
and copies of audit reports on such grants must be filed with them. 

To provide the independence and impartiality required for effective auditing, two state auditors are 
appointed by the General Assembly. To ensure this necessary independence, appropriations to the 
auditors are excluded from executive restriction. 

The principles of equal employment opportunity are meticulously observed by this office in all staff 
appointments, promotions and training. Improvement has been made in the career advancement of 
female staff members, resulting in promotions to higher technical positions and increased earnings. 
Intensive efforts to recruit minority members have been continued. 

Field Audit Division 

The Field Audit Division, with 76 full-time employees, audits the accounts of each agency of the 
state and of all institutions supported by the state. Each audit includes an examination and verification 
of accounting records and documents, evaluation of internal controls, a determination of the agency ' s 



10 LEGISLATIVE AGENCIES 



compliance with statutory and budgetary requirements, verification of the collection and proper 
handling of revenue, and determination of the propriety of expenditures. A written report is made and 
filed on every audit and becomes a public document. Copies are sent regularly to the heads of the 
audited agencies, the Legislative Management Committee, the Program Review and Investigations 
Committee, the Joint Committee on Appropriations, the Governor, the Comptroller, Treasurer, 
Secretary of the Office of Policy and Management, State Library, designated federal agencies, news 
media and, when appropriate, to members of boards and commissions and others. Reports consist of 
comments, recommendations, and certifications (professional opinions), together with financial 
statements setting forth the conditions and operations of all state funds. During the 1991-92 fiscal 
year, 89 audit reports, including 45 prepared under federal "single audit" guidelines, were completed. 
They ranged in scope from audits of small commissions to audits of major agencies of the state. In 
addition, one special report on federal funds matters was prepared. A total of 83 matters were formally 
reported to the Governor, Legislative Program Review and Investigations Committee, and others, 
under the provisions of Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 2-90. Numerous less serious matters such as minor 
acts of vandalism were reported collectively by memoranda. More than 45 whistle-blower complaints 
were investigated and several of them were covered in the 83 formal letters to the Governor. 
Assistance was rendered to members of the General Assembly as requested by them. 

A total of 392 recommendations were included in the 89 audit reports issued during the year. These 
reports also included a review of the implementation of recommendations made in the prior audits of 
the agencies audited in 1991-92. Implementation follow-up procedures, in addition to agency 
response to the auditors, include reviews by the Comptroller, the Office of Policy and Management 
and the Legislative Program Review and Investigations Committee. Agencies implemented 55 
percent of the prior audits' recommendations. 

State Auditors Henry J. Becker, Jr. and Leo V. Donohue retired onMarch 1 , 1992, after many years 
of state service. Just prior to their retirement the decision was made to commence planning for the first 
statewide single audit for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1992. A contracted feasibility study had 
indicated that it would be prudent to adopt this approach for federal funds as opposed to the traditional 
department by department approach. The new approach will integrate the annual audits of the 
Comptroller and Treasurer with audits of the agencies having major revenues and expenditures. Care 
will be taken to assure that none of the audit duties mandated under Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 2-90 will 
be overlooked. 




ELECTED 
STATE OFFICIALS 



Secretary of the State 

PAULINE R. KEZER, Secretary of the State 

Paul A. Audley, Deputy Secretary of the State 

Established - 1638 Authority - State Constitution 

Central office - 30 Trinity St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 97 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $3,613,419 

Capital outlay - $207,700 

Organization structure - Management and Support Services, 

Commercial Recording, Election Services, 

Records and Legislative Services, and State Board of Accountancy 




As the official keeper of a wide array of public records and documents, the Secretary of the 
State's Office is a vital source of information on corporations, commercial lending, elections, 
legislation and other areas. The secretary is the Commissioner of Elections for the state; administers 
Connecticut's notary public laws; publishes the Connecticut State Register and Manual; licenses and 
regulates certified public accountants ; and performs numerous other statutory functions. 

The office was established following the adoption of the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut in 
1638. At the time, the secretary was charged with keeping the state's public documents, formal 
records, and the state seal. The agency has evolved from its original custodial duties to more than 50 
constitutional and statutory mandates, responding to more than 600,000 requests for information 
annually. The agency reorganized on January 9, 1991, when Pauline R. Kezer took office as 
Connecticut's 70th Secretary of the State. 

The Office of the Secretary of the State is firmly committed to a personnel management program 
designed to ensure equal opportunity for all employees and applicants for employment without regard 
to race, color, religion, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, mental retardation, physical 
disability, prior convictions of a crime, sexual preference, past or present history of mental disorder, 
or political affiliation. The elimination of sexual harassment is also an important element of the 
agency's comprehensive affirmative action program. 

Management and Support Services 

The division comprises the Secretary of the State and the capitol office staff, the Deputy Secretary 
of the State, and a wide range of age ncy support functions, including business, personnel, affirmative 
action, duplicating, mailroom, and information technology support. 

During 1991-92, the business office deposited $14,754,371 in revenue and spent $3,821, 119. This 
office is also the distribution and sales agent for the Connecticut General Statutes, public and special 
acts, the Connecticut State Register and Manual (known as the "Blue Book"), Corporation Laws, and 
numerous other agency publications. The Information Technology Support Group is responsible for 
agency automation, and operates two mini computers as well as personal computers. This group 
supports agency- wide Wang VS word processing and a number of database applications. This group 
is also responsible for the Corporations Information System, a large system on an IBM mainframe 
computer. 

During the past year, the group has: continued efforts to automate the Commercial Recording 
Division; continued to automate and update a number of other in-house data processing applications; 
investigated and begun to document additional business areas requiring automation; and continued 
an intensive conversion effort from Wang word processing to Wang WP Plus for in-house word 
processing. 

Commercial Recording Division 

The Corporation Unit files and maintains legally required records showing the formation of and 
fundamental changes to corporations, foundations, professional corporations, cooperatives, eccle- 
siastical societies and church corporations. 

12 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 13 

There are approximately 105,094 active and over 141,918 inactive records in the corporation 
computer data base. Also, certificates of formation and amendments to limited partnerships, 
certificates of compliance by public service companies, business trusts, railroad mortgages, ap- 
pointments for service of process under wills, appointments of the Secretary of the State as agent for 
service for out-of-state real estate, and other required appointments are filed and maintained here. This 
operation also processes service of process for corporations, partnerships and out-of-state individuals. 

In addition to determining statutory compliance, the division disseminates filed information to the 
general public, the business, banking, and legal communities; makes computer inquiry terminals 
available; and provides an expedited services program (a 24-hour turnaround service) for certain 
filings. 

Transactions relevant to security interests in personal property are perfected by filing financing 
statements in the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Unit. These filings protect the holder of the 
security interest by securing the lien and providing public notice that such interest exists. Approxi- 
mately 65,300 UCC financing statements were processed during the 1991-92 fiscal year. Also, 
documents are filed pertaining to bulk transfers, auctions, and vessel liens. 

Trade, service, collective, certification, and device marks are granted registration, and the division 
investigates and collects fees and penalties from foreign corporations doing business in Connecticut 
without authority. 

Election Services 

The Secretary is the state's chief elections official, and is charged with administering election law 
and ensuring a fair and impartial elections system. The Election Services Division administers all state 
and some federal laws pertaining to elections, primaries, nominating procedures, the acquisition and 
exercise of voting rights, and campaign finances. 

The division issues, receives, tabulates and decides whether to approve nominating petitions for all 
elective offices. It receives and reviews lists of elective offices to be filled, lists of nominations, 
certificates of party endorsement and primary eligibility, absentee ballots, sample ballot labels, and 
vacancies in elective municipal offices. 

In addition, the division prepares and distributes annually about five million forms in 600 varieties. 
Approximately 80,000 instructional mailings are sent out to town clerks and registrars of voters each 
year. 

The division answers numerous inquiries on questions of election law, receives and reviews 
election and primary returns, tabulates returns for state elections and primaries, and publishes returns 
for state elections. 

The office also prepares and distributes calendars for each regularly scheduled election and for 
special elections, of which there are approximately 20 each year. Home rule charters, party rules, 
voting machine statistics, registration and enrollment statistics, and other election-related materials 
are filed with the division. 

Campaign financing statements are prepared and distributed by and filed in this office. Disclosure 
statements received from political and party committees, as required by state law, totaled approxi- 
mately 13,500 during the 1991-92 fiscal year. Also, approximately 4,000 financing reports were 
received from committees required to file by federal law. 

The Secretary of the State conducts statewide conferences for local election officials, town clerks 
and registrars of voters. Training sessions for moderators and voting machine mechanics are also 
conducted, and qualified applicants are certified for appointment to these positions. Under the voting 
machine inspection law, the secretary also approves voting machines and maintains a roster of voting 
machine examiners. This office also participates in the training and certification of town clerks. 

Voter guides and other literature on matters such as absentee voting, registration to vote, proposed 
constitutional amendments, party enrollment, nominating procedures, the use of the voting machine, 
and campaign financing are made available for public distribution. Specialized handbooks for 
election officials, including the moderators handbook, the procedure manual for counting absentee 
ballots, and the recanvass procedure manual are continually updated and distributed. A current 
election laws compilation is published, updated annually, and distributed to local election officials 
and others. 

Records and Legislative Services 

This division performs a wide range of statutory functions and administrative support services. It 
is composed of five units. 

The Legislation/Regulations Unit is the official record keeper of all acts, orders, grants, and 



14 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

resolutions of the General Assembly, and of all regulations of state departments and agencies of the 
executive branch. It transmits all public and special acts to the Governor for executive action; returns 
vetoed bills and messages to the General Assembly; notifies legislators of special and veto sessions; 
prints and distributes copies of all public and special acts effective from passage; prepares plain and 
certified copies of bills, resolutions, public acts, special acts, and regulations; and provides general 
research assistance to the public regarding legislation and regulations. During the 1992 legislative 
session, the unit received and filed 183 resolutions and 1,475 bills of the General Assembly. The 
General Assembly approved 3 1 4 of these bills and 1 2 were vetoed by the Governor. Last year this unit 
also received and filed 121 regulations of state agencies. 

The Notary Public Unit administers Connecticut's notary public laws. It reviews applications, 
maintains a computerized database of appointment records, investigates complaints against and 
publishes a manual for notaries. Last year the unit commissioned 2,925 new notaries, processed 
approximately 10,000 renewal applications, and maintained the records for 48,000 notaries public. 

The Authentication Unit authenticates the elections or appointments of notaries public, judges, 
town clerks, and other state and municipal officials. Last year this unit prepared approximately 4,000 
authentication certificates. 

The Publications Unit compiles, publishes, and distributes a variety of materials regarding the 
state's history and government. The most important of these is the Connecticut State Register and 
Manual, which is revised and published annually. Other materials produced by the unit include a 
booklet of the constitutions of the United States and the state of Connecticut, and various listings of 
state and municipal officials. 

The Records Management Unit provides record-keeping services to the Office of the Secretary of 
the State. It stores, retrieves, and copies records housed both on- and off-site; microfilms records; 
develops and administers records retention schedules; prepares indexes and guides to groups and 
series of records; maintains the office library; and provides records research assistance to the public 
and other divisions of the office. 

Among the many other functions performed by this division, it receives and files a variety of 
documents including extradition papers, municipal ordinances and special acts, and bonds of trading 
stamp companies and state officers. Last year it filed 1,750 state agency meeting notices and 
schedules, and posted special meeting notices in accordance with statute. This division also reviews 
requests to use the state arms and seal, and staffs two general information telephone lines for the office. 

Board of Accountancy 

The Board of Accountancy is composed of six members, appointed by the Governor. Four are 
licensed professional accountants and two are public members. It is the board's responsibility to 
insure that the highest standards of integrity and professionalism are maintained by Connecticut's 
Certified Public Accountants and licensed Public Accountants. To this end the board evaluates the 
qualifications of applicants for the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam, provides for a written 
examination process, sets experience requirements, develops regulations, holds hearings and imposes 
disciplinary action, and collects fees for examinations and individual/firm registrations. 

The board conducts written examinations for CPA candidates twice yearly, in May and November. 
In November 1 99 1 , the board administered examinations to 1 ,048 candidates, and 212 passed. In May 
1992, the board administered examinations to 761 candidates, and 205 passed. 

The board issued 345 licenses based on examination and 49 reciprocal licenses. As of June 30, 
1 992, there were 3,265 certified public accountants and 89 Public Accountants licensed in Connecticut, 
and 1,276 firms held permits to practice. 

The fiscal year began with the board having 29 unresolved complaints. During the year, the board 
received 253 new complaints. As of June 30, 1992, 144 complaints were resolved, settled or 
dismissed, and 138 were pending. 



ELECTED STATE OFFICI ALS 1 5 



State Ethics Commission 

ALAN S. PLOFSKY, Executive Director and General Counsel 
Established - 1978 Statutory authority - Sec. 1-80 
Central office - 97 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 9 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $409,457 

• 

The State Ethics Commission is an independent seven-member citizens' panel. Three members 
are appointed by the Governor, four by the legislative leadership. The commission is one of 
the principal agencies established to build and maintain the confidence of Connecticut citizens in the 
integrity of their state government. 

In the year ending June 30, 1992, the commission issued 24 advisory opinions interpreting the 
state's codes of ethics, and an additional 134 staff letters providing informal guidance. During this 
period, the commission also conducted 35 confidential evaluations and, as a result, filed nine 
complaints alleging code violations. Successful staff prosecution of all complaints completed during 
the period resulted in the imposition of $9,600 in penalties. 

During the 1992 General Assembly Session, 1,932 lobbyists were registered and submitted 
required periodic financial reports. Additionally, the commission received over 1,200 annual 
financial interest statements from the state's public officials and senior employees. Most information 
on file is public. 

In its continuing effort to emphasize education, the commission distributed approximately 20,000 
guides and newsletters during the year. Additionally, staff presented some two dozen seminars and 
training sessions. 

The commission is strongly committed to the concept of equal opportunity and is an affirmative 
action employer. 



Freedom of Information Commission 

MITCHELL W. PEARLMAN, Executive Director and General Counsel 

Established - 1975 Statutory authority - Sec. l-21j 

Central office - 97 Elm St. - Rear, Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 11 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $480,802 

Capital outlay - $2,439 

• 

The State Freedom of Information Commissionis an independent government oversight agency. 
It is charged with assuring the people of Connecticut access to the records and meetings of all 
public agencies. The commission is composed of five members and has a legal staff of six attorneys. 
Since its inception on October 1, 1975, more than 4,700 contested cases have been docketed and it 
has issued over 70 advisory opinions. The legal staff brought to the courts. In addition, the commission 
conducts numerous educational sessions and speaking engagements concerning Connecticut's model 
Freedom of Information Act. 

The Freedom of Information Commission has developed its own affirmative action plan to comply 
with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 46a-70 through 46a-78. The commission is vigorously committed to 
the concepts of equal opportunity and affirmative action not only as a matter of law, but as a matter 
of agency policy. 



16 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

Office of the Treasurer 

FRANCISCO L. BORGES, State Treasurer 

Edward J. Forand Jr., Deputy State Treasurer 

Established - 1639 Statutory authority - State Constitution 

Central office - 55 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 160 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - General Fund - $2,814,726; 

Bond Fund - $43,536; Investment Fund - $22,993,166; 

Second Injury Fund - $4,662,500 

Capital outlay - 1991-92 - General Fund - $19,872; Investment Fund - $281,302; 

Second Injury Program - $318,469; Unclaimed Property Taken In - $24,900,830; 

Amount Returned to Owners - $2,849,063 

Organization structure - Executive Office, Cash Management Division, Debt 

Management Division, Investment Division, and Second Injury Fund 



.»*♦*** 




The Office of the State Treasurer is the financial cornerstone of state government, overseeing 
a wide v ariety of activities having to do with the prudent conservation and management of state 
funds, including the administration of a portfolio of pension assets worth approximately $10 billion. 

The treasurer is one of six constitutional, popularly elected officers of the state. As directed by the 
State Constitution in Article Fourth, Section 22, he or she is responsible for receiving all monies 
belonging to the state, making disbursements as directed by statute, and managing, investing and 
borrowing all funds for the state. 

The treasurer monitors and implements the state's investment policies in compliance with all 
relevant public acts. Also, incompliance with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 46a-78, the treasurer annually 
submits an affirmative action program to the state Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, 
reflecting the treasury 's continuing commitment to achieve both the hiring and program goals set forth 
in the agency's affirmative action plan. In addition, state Treasurer Francisco L. Borges has insisted 
that all firms doing business with the treasury must institute active programs of corporate social 
responsibility, including affirmative action plans, if the firms do not already have them. 

The Office of the Treasurer is organized in several divisions, each with particular responsibilities, 
as follows: 

• The Executive Office of the Treasurer, including the treasurer and the deputy treasurer, has 
responsibility for overall administration, social compliance, legal and legislative affairs and business 
office functions including personnel and office services. The division also administers the Unclaimed 
Property Program, by which the treasurer responsibly holds all property, real and personal, left 
unclaimed and apparently abandoned by its owners. In the fiscal year ended June 30, 1992, the 
program collected $24,900,830 worth of unclaimed property and returned $2,849,063 to the rightful 
owners. 

• The Cash Management and Information Services Division, under the direction of an assistant 
treasurer, has responsibility for cash accounting and reporting, cash positioning and forecasting, bank 
and fund reconciliation, bank administration and check processing. This division of the treasury 
authorizes, maintains, monitors, reconciles and administers multiple depository and concentration 
accounts in commercial banks throughout the state. Deposits made to local depository accounts are 
regularly transferred to concentration accounts for disbursement and investment purposes. Currently, 
fees for bank-provided depository, disbursement and cash management services for all state agencies 
are managed through a compensating balance arrangement monitored by the division. All treasury 
General Fund bank balances in excess of the required compensatory amount are invested by the 
division in the state's Short-Term Investment Fund (STIF). The divisionhas implemented procedures 
to accelerate the collection of state receipts through the use of lockboxes, electronic transfers and 
increased use of concentration account deposit tracking services. This division also administers the 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 17 

treasury's local area network system and provides data processing training for employees. 

• The Debt Management Division, under the direction of an assistant treasurer, administers the 
state's bond and debt financing program, including the sale of state bonds. It coordinates policies and 
procedures with the state Office of Policy and Management and affected state agencies, with a primary 
goal the reduction of the costs of public indebtedness. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1992, the state issued debt as follows: $266,000,000 of new 
Special Tax Obligation bonds; $125,715,000 in refunding STOs; $981,600,000 in new andrefunding 
General Obligation bonds; $330,000,000 in Bond Anticipation Notes; and $965 ,7 1 0,000 in Economic 
Recovery Notes to finance a variety of state programs, projects, facilities and other needs. 

• The Investment Division, under the direction of an assistant treasurer, is responsible for managing 
a state pension- fund portfolio of approximately $10 billion, including a variety of equity, fixed- 
income and real estate investments. The treasurer receives advice and counsel on investments from 
the Investments Division and from the state Investment Advisory Council (I AC), created by PA. 73- 
594 to permit the treasury access to knowledgeable individuals in the investment community. State 
employees' and teachers' unions also have representatives on the IAC, which is statutorily respon- 
sible for reviewing all of the state's investments and advising on policy. Pension, retirement and trust 
fund assets managed by the Investments Division include the teachers', state employees', municipal 
employees', judges', and probate court retirement funds. 

Several investment funds under PA. 72-229 serve as investment mediums for various pension, 
retirement and trust funds of which the treasurer is sole trustee, including the Cash Reserve Account, 
Mutual Equity, Mutual Fixed Income, Mutual Mortgage, Real Estate, International Stock, Interna- 
tional Bond, Venture Capital, Commercial Mortgage, Residential Mortgage and Connecticut Pro- 
grams funds. The Investments Division also oversees the Combined Investment Pool for Short-Term 
Investments, created by P. A. 72-236 and usually referred to as STIF. STIF is the medium whereby 
temporary surplus cash from all sources is combined for investment purposes. 

• The Second Injury Fund, under the direction of an assistant treasurer, administers the Second 
Injury Program. Originally created to provide an incentive to employers to hire workers with 
disabilities, SIF is responsible for investigation and verification of claims, claims processing and 
making payments for catastrophic workers' compensation claims payable through the fund. 



Office of the State Comptroller 

WILLIAM E. CURRY JR., Comptroller 

Anthony A. Williams, Deputy Comptroller 

Established - 1786 Authority - State Constitution 

Central office - 55 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 288 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $11.0 Million 

Systems development expenses - $2.7 Million 

Capital outlay - $3,165 

Organization structure - Management Services Group, Financial Information 

Systems Group, Financial Management Group, 

and Employee Benefits Group 

• 

The State Comptroller adjusts and settles all public accounts, except grants and orders of the 
General Assembly. The state Constitution gives this authority to the office. In addition, state 
law charges the office to adjust and/or settle all demands against the state not first adjusted and settled 
by the General Assembly; to prepare all accounting statements relating to the financial conditions of 
the state; to pay all wages and salaries of state employees; to develop and implement new 
computerized payroll, personnel, accounting and budgeting systems, and to administer miscellaneous 
appropriations for employee taxes, health services and insurance, as well as grants to police, fire 
fighters and municipalities. The Office of the State Comptroller (OSC) is committed to affirmative 
action and equal opportunity and pledges to make every good-faith effort to achieve all objectives, 
goals and timetables in its affirmative action plan, which has been approved by the Commission on 



18 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

Human Rights and Opportunities. Contracts, leases and purchase orders processed by the Office of 
the State Comptroller contain clauses requiring non-discrimination, and vendors are required to 
certify the same. 

Management Services Group 

The Management Services Group provides overall policy and program direction to the work of the 
OSC and its subsidiary programs and maintains and monitors the OSC Strategic Plan. The group 
provides communications, legal, programmatic, and legislative services for the department. It 
reviews audit reports, monitor compliance by state agencies, and investigate and report on irregulari- 
ties and inefficiencies. The group audits operations of the state Offtrack Betting system, prescribes 
accounting methods for state agencies, and monitors compliance with these methods. It prepares cost 
allocation reports to allow the state to recover reimbursements from federal and other sources. The 
group is comprised of: the OSC Executive Office, the Management and Budget Office, and the 
Accounting Systems Division. 

The OSC Executive Office provides policy direction to the department. It monitors management 
reports; tracks progress of the OSC in relation to its regularly updated Strategic Plan; develops new 
programs and projects, initially managing them in close contact with the relevant division; manages 
all legal activities, and directs, through the Accounting Systems Division, special studies and 
investigations of state agencies and functions. 

The Management and Budget Office prepares, analyzes, and monitors OSC's budget and mis- 
cellaneous appropriations; prepares and monitors budgets for the Office of the Claims Commission 
(OCC); reviews vendor payments paid from the operating budgets of the OSC and OCC; pays refunds 
of disability and death benefits to state firemen and policemen, death benefits to state employees, and 
grant payments to towns; provides support services for OSC and OCC. It reviews OSC programs to 
ensure conformance to contractual, regulatory, and statutory obligations. 

The Accounting Systems Division develops and promulgates complex accounting systems and 
procedures to maximize accountability, standardization, and cost effectiveness; monitors agency 
compliance with these systems and procedures; reviews reports of the Auditors of Public Accounts 
to ensure agency compliance with auditing recommendations; and conducts various other accounting, 
auditing and regulatory functions for the OSC and other agencies. 

Financial Information Systems Group 

This group is responsible for developing, implementing, and maintaining statewide computer- 
based financial systems. It provides automated systems to OSC, technical assistance to agencies for 
automated functions and issues reports from computer data files. The group is made up of the 
following units: Computer Services, the Retirement Database, and Financial Management Informa- 
tion Systems (FMIS). 

Computer Services provides applications support and operational maintenance; educates and trains 
staff; develops, maintains and upgrades computer applications; provides 24-hour, seven-day-a-week 
computer processing; provides for data integrity and security and develops long-range information 
technology plans. It maintains a statewide telecommunications network of more than 450 terminals 
linking all state agencies to OSC core applications. 

The FMIS Division develops, implements, and maintains statewide financial systems. It designs, 
implements, and maintains OSC office automation; evaluates and introduces new hardware and 
software for OSC activities, and maintains a statewide communications network for financial 
applications. During the 1991-92 fiscal year, the division developed and piloted a statewide Central 
Accounting System (CAS), which will soon be made available to all state agencies. 

Financial Management Group 

This group consists of the Central Accounting Division, the Central Accounts Payable Division, 
and the Central Payroll Division. Together these divisions oversee and administer statewide 
accounting and expenditure procedures. 

Central Accounting informs the public, the legislature, the executive branch and all state agencies 
about the financial condition of the state. As part of this effort, it publishes Connecticut's Compre- 
hensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and issues monthly financial statements to the Governor. 
It prepares monthly financial statements; monitors agency commitments and expenditures; provides 
detailed financial information for local, state and federal agencies; maintains and improves the 
accounting system for the state's financial records; approves the state's assumption of an obligation 
and the reservation of funds against an agency appropriation; ratifies disbursements of the state's 
obligations and charges said payments to the state agency's appropriation; manages the state's 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 19 

encumbrance and expenditure records in accordance with procedures developed with the administra- 
tor of public records; enforces the statutory, regulatory, and accounting requirements prescribed by 
law, and maintains statutory grant program for payments to municipalities. 

The Central Accounts Payable Division maintains the state central accounts payable process, 
auditing encumbrances and claims for legal conformance and coordinating a range of processing 
activities. The unit's 1991-92 statistical evaluation is as follows: state vendor payments, $5.3 billion; 
grant payments to municipalities, $2.1 billion; 1099 Miscellaneous Income Reportage/IRS, $90.4 
million; state employees allow ances/IRS, $2.2 million. Central Accounts Payable processed one 
million pre-audited claims in the 1991-92 fiscal year. 

The Central Payroll Division pays all state employees, handles all payroll deductions, maintains 
records on payroll taxes and deposits federal income tax withholding and social security contribu- 
tions. It pre-audits and issues state employee paychecks on a biweekly basis; submits deduction 
reports, deposits withholding and social security payments, and maintains wage execution, savings 
bond and direct deposit programs. For the 1991 calendar year, Central Payroll prepared wage, 
withholding tax and social security reports for a total of 89,934 employees; processed a total of 4,993 
payroll distributions which produced 312,663 direct-deposit transactions and 1,425,781 payroll 
checks for an average of 67,076 employee and/or deduction checks issued each bi-weekly payroll 
cycle. 

Employee Benefits Group 

This group is comprised of: the Retirement Division and the Special Services Division. The 
Retirement Division administers all state pension plans except the Teachers' Retirement System, 
providing a comprehensive package of services ranging from pre-retirement counseling to post- 
mortem accounting. State Employees Retirement System statistics for the 1991-92 fiscal year: 
Benefit checks issued - 337,775; retirement applications - 3,396; retirement credit purchases billed 
- 1,483; members counseled - 654; agency and statewide conferences with approximately 3,061 
attending - 39; refunds to contributors -801 , and; group medical coverage in force - more than 33,405 
people. The division also processed for the Municipal Employees Retirement System and miscella- 
neous systems approximately 42,726 benefit checks; 407 retirement applications; 789 refunds to 
contributors; and group medical coverage in force for more than 360 retirees. 

The Special Services Division administers state employee benefits, manages the state deferred 
compensation plan and administers employee travel. Special Service Division statistics for the 1991- 
92 fiscal year: group life insurance in force as of June 30, 1992 - 34,936 active employees with 
coverage of $1.2 billion and 20,823 retired employees with coverage of $222.4 million; paid (net) 
$111.3 million as state's share of health insurance plans covering 53,712 active employees; 13,998 
employees enrolled in deferred compensation programs which deferred annually $46.2 million for a 
total plan asset value of $221.4 million; 2,070 terminated employees and/or dependents enrolled in 
extended health insurance coverage; $305 . 1 million collected in fringe benefits; $ 1 .7 million paid for 
air travel; $9.3 million paid in unemployment compensation costs. 



Office of Claims Commissioner 

Terence D. Mariani, Commissioner 

• 

Background and Duties of the Commissioner 

Under the doctrine of sovereign immunity no law suits may be brought against the State of 
Connecticut unless the state has granted permission. In some instances the Connecticut 
legislature has granted such permission by statute. For example, persons suffering injuries or losses 
because of a defective highway are granted permission to sue under Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 13 a- 144. 

For instances in which there is no statute specifically granting permission to sue, the legislature has 
adopted a statutory scheme that allows persons to petition the Claims Commissioner for permission 
to sue the state. 

Under state law the Claims Commissioner may, when a claim is deemed "just and equitable," grant 
the injured person permission to sue the state, free of the sovereign immunity bar. Within limits, (up 
to $7,500) monetary awards may also be granted directly to the injured person by the Claims 
Commissioner. In addition the commissioner may also recommend settlements of claims to the 
General Assembly. 



20 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

The commissioner maintains a record of each claim, conducts hearings and informal conferences, 
adjudicates claims and issues findings and orders, all as required by law. 

Summary of Claims for Fiscal 1991 - 1992 

As of June 30, 1992, there were 2,315 claims pending compared with 2,396 claims pending as of 
June 30, 1991. The reduction in the number of claims pending is accounted for by the fact that the 
number of claims disposed of (900) exceeded the number of new claims filed (8 1 9) by 8 1 , hence the 
reduction in the number of claims pending by 81 from July 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992. 

In anticipation of an increased case load, the General Assembly was asked to permit waiving of 
hearings on claims of up to $5,000. The permission was granted by Public Act 92-34 which amended 
Conn. Gen. Statute Sec. 4-151a to take effect on October 1, 1992. The previous limit was $1,000. It 
is anticipated that this new limit will permit a reduction in the number of cases pending and at the same 
time result in savings by relieving state employees of the time consuming burden of testifying. New 
procedures to maximize the benefits of the new law are now being instituted. Included in the claims 
disposed of during the 1991-92 fiscal year were 19 recommendations to the legislature for approval. 
These are claims in which the damages sought exceed $7,500. Of the claims sent for legislative action 
17 were approved in accordance with the commissioner's recommendations, one was put off until the 
next session and one, a personal injury claim was denied by the General Assembly. 



Connecticut State Employees Retirement Commission 

PETER R. BLUM, Chairman 

William E. Curry Jr., Secretary Ex Officio 

Established - 1939 Statutory authority - Chap. 65, 66, 104, 113, 

774, 872, 886, pension agreement 

Central office - 55 Elm Street, Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full- time employees - 80 

• 

The Connecticut State Employees Retirement Commission as of June 30, 1992 consisted of 15 
commissioners: Peter R. Blum, chairman; Dominic J. Badolato, employee trustee; Leonard G. 
Barbieri, management trustee; Robert Baus, actuarial trustee; Patrick J. Carolan, employee trustee; 
Charles W. Casella, employee trustee; Robert D. Coffey, management trustee; Edward C. Marth, 
employee trustee; Merrilee Milstein, employee trustee; Steven Perruccio, employee trustee; Claude 
Poulin, actuarial trustee; YvetteM. Thiesfield, management trustee; Joseph G. Wankerl, management 
trustee; Richard D. Wilber, management trustee; Linda Yelmini, management trustee. 

The Connecticut State Employees Retirement Commission administers the State Employees 
Retirement System; the Alternate Retirement Program for eligible employees of the Board of Higher 
Education; the Connecticut Municipal Employees Retirement Systems A and B ; the State' s Attorneys 
Retirement System; Public Defenders Retirement System; Special Statutory Retirement Benefits; the 
Judges and Compensation Commissioners Retirement System; and the Connecticut Probate Judges 
and Employees Retirement System. 

The operating agency for the commission is the Retirement Division of the Comptroller's Office 
- Steven Weinberger, director. 

During the year the commission met and ruled on 3,251 retirement applications and additional 
matters relating to the administration of the retirement systems. In addition, the Medical Examining 
Board approved 145 disability retirements. 

The state is continuing to fund these retirement benefits under the funding plan established by the 
1971 General Assembly, as modified by Public Act 83-533 and the 1988 - 1994 Pension Arbitration 
Award. 

Approximately 55,046 active and 727 inactive (vested) employees were members as of June 30, 
1991. 

Subsequent to certification by the commission on November 21, 1991, based upon the actuary's 
recommendation, the General Assembly made the following appropriation: 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 



21 



Appropriation Request for Fiscal Year starting July 1, 1992 $426,338,628.00 

General Fund Appropriation 376,963,428.00 

Special Transportation Fund Appropriation 26,800,000.00 

Recoveries from Other Funds 22,575,200.00 

Collective Bargaining Surplus (150,000,000.00) 

Transfers in SB 2023 (3,000,000.00) 

Net Appropriation for Fiscal Year starting July 1, 1992: $273,338,628.00 



Staiement of Operations for the 1091-92 Fiscal Year 






Assets at Cost - July 1, 1991 

Receipts 

Employee Contributions 

Federal Contributions 

Federal and other Reimbursements 

State Retirement Contribution Payments - General 
Fund 

State Retirement Contribution Payments - 
Transportation Fund 

Interest and Investment Income 

Gain on Sale of Investments 

Disbursements 

Refunds on Termination, or Death 

Retirement Allowances Paid 

Interest Awarded 

Actuarial Services 

Retirement Commission Services 

Loss on Sale of Investments 

Net Assets At Cost - June 30, 1991 



$2,940,339,456.24 



2,012.25 
117,981,248.00 

99,137,025.00 

33,204,000.00 

152,567,822.13 
44,279,699.52 

1,902,815.84 

304,308,741.73 

661,157.59 

51,060.00 

86,902.08 

1,396,936.04 

$3,112,273,456.26 



Policemen and Firemen Survivors Benefit Fund 

This fund provides income for the dependents of deceased policemen and firemen of municipalities 
which elect to join. Six municipalities were participating as of June 30, 1992. Thirty -three dependents 
of deceased employees were receiving survivor benefits. 

Federal Old-Age, Survivors, Disability and Health Insurance 

The Retirement Commission, by statute, is the agent for the state in all matters relating to the Social 
Security Agreement executed under Section 218 of the Social Security Act. In that capacity, the 
commission extended Social Security coverage to additional employees of several political subdivi- 
sions of the state. 



Connecticut Municipal Employees Retirement System 

The Connecticut Municipal Employees Retirement Act provides for two retirement plans with 
separate funds for those political subdivisions which elect to participate. Fund "A" applies to the 
benefits established in 1945 as amended to date. There were no municipalities participating in Fund 
"A" as of June 30, 1 992. Fund "B " applies to the benefits established in 1 947 as amended to date. There 
were 98 municipalities participating in Fund "B" as of June 30, 1992. Active membership was 7,339 
with 3,221 retirees and optionees receiving benefits. 

These systems are supported solely by the contributions of the municipalities and the employees, 



22 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

with no contributions by the state. The rates of contribution by the municipalities are adjusted 
periodically in such a way that the assets of the funds, together with the present value of future 
contributions for which the municipalities are obligated, are kept approximately equal to the liabilities 
in order to maintain the funding on an actuarial basis. 

Public Act 83-383 provides a continuing cost-of-living adjustment for municipal employee 
retirees, payable commencing each July first, if retired for disability, otherwise on the first of July 
following attainment of age 65, at a variable rate, not to exceed five percent, based on the assets and 
liabilities of the fund, provided no cost-of-living adjustment is less than three percent. 

Connecticut Probate Judges and Employees Retirement System 

The Connecticut Probate Judges and Employees Retirement System provides income for retired 
probate court members. As of June 30, 1992, this system had 349 active members, with 135 retirees 
and 11 widows and widowers receiving benefits. 

State's Attorneys Retirement System 

Under the terms of Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 51^9, 51-278, 51-287, and 51-288, the State's 
Attorneys Retirement System provides for income to certain retired state's attorneys and widows and 
widowers of state's attorneys. As of June 30, 1992, this system had six active members, with thirteen 
retirees and four widows and widowers receiving benefits. 

Pensions and Retirement - Other Statutory 

Certain statutes provide retirement income for former governors and widows or widowers of 
former governors, retired county employees, retired law librarians and provisions for certain 
individuals as stipulated in special acts passed by the General Assembly. 

Judges and Compensation Commissioners Retirement System 

Public Act 8 1 -46, effective October 1 , 1 982, created the Judges and Compensation Commissioners 
Retirement System to provide retirement income forjudges, compensation commissioners and their 
widows and widowers. As of June 30, 1992 this systemhad 176 activemembers with 85 retired judges, 
two retired compensation commissioner, 66 widows or widowers of judges and three widows of 
compensation commissioners receiving benefits. 

Public Defenders Retirement System 

Public Act 84-421, effective July 1, 1985, created the Public Defenders Retirement System to 
provide retirement income for certain retired public defenders and widows or widowers of public 
defenders. As of June 30, 199 1 this system had no active members with five retirees receiving benefits. 



State Elections Enforcement Commission 

ANDREW D. COLEMAN, Esq., Chairperson 

Established - 1974 Statutory authority - Sec. 9-7a and 9-7b 

Central office - 410 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 06103 

Average number of full-time employees - 9 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $389,083. 



The commission is the only executive branch agency which conducts investigations of 
complaints concerning violations of the state laws governing elections, primaries and 
referenda. To complete an investigation, the commission may issue subpoenas and conduct hearings. 
Enforcement of the laws is accomplished by imposition of civil sanctions, including monetary fines, 
and when an agency investigation reveals sufficient evidence of criminaTconduct, the results are 
referred to the chief state's attorney for prosecution. The commission also utilizes a random review 
process of the campaign disclosure statements filed by state, legislative and municipal candidates for 
elective office, political parties and political action committees. The objective of this program is to 
correct errors, cure omissions and deter violations. In addition, the commission informs and educates 
those who are required to comply with campaign finance laws by publishing legal summaries and 
explanations, conducting seminars and issuing advisory opinions upon request. The commission also 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 23 

annually prepares and presents recommendations to the General Assembly for revisions of the 
election laws. 

Commissioners serve on a part time basis and receive $50 per diem for their attendance at 
commission meetings or hearings. The commissioners who served during this fiscal year were: 
Andrew D. Coleman, Esq. of Cheshire, chairperson; Alice W. Lynch of Westbrook, vice chairperson; 
Robert S. Orcutt of Guilford; Albert Rogers of New Haven; and Michael H. Handler, Esq., of 
Manchester. The commission conducted 15 meetings during the fiscal year. 

Investigations 

The commission conducted 101 investigations of suspected election law violations; 83 of which 
were in response to written complaints, and 18 were referrals from the Secretary of the State of non 
filers of required campaign statements. Violations most frequently complained of included: the 
making and receipt of prohibited contributions, irregularities in the conduct of elections, misuse of 
public funds to advocate the outcome of referenda and non-compliance with the filing requirements 
of the campaign finance disclosure laws. 

The commission collected $37,630.00 in civil penalties and forfeitures for violations of the laws. 
The results of two investigations were referred to the Chief State's Attorney's Office for prosecution. 
The results of other investigations included voluntary compliance effected, reprimands issued or 
cases dismissed due to a finding of no violation, insufficient evidence or lack of jurisdiction. At the 
close of the fiscal year, 20 investigations remained active. 

Audits 

The commission's two accountants review the campaign finance statements on file with the Office 
of the Secretary of the State on a random basis to monitor compliance with the campaign finance 
requirements and educate committee treasurers of their duties and responsibilities. Audits are 
conducted both in-house as well as in the field. Approximately 1 50 committees were reviewed during 
this fiscal year. 

Public Information and Education 

The commission staff conducted six seminars for candidates and their treasurers to aid in their 
compliance with the requirements of the campaign finance laws. The commission also provides 
information on these requirements to the town clerks, who are the filing repositories for municipal 
candidates and referenda. The commission staff continued to actively participate in the conferences 
held by the Town Clerks and the Registrars of Voters Association during the year. The staff also 
responded to thousands of written and oral inquiries concerning campaign and election matters. 

Recommendations to the 1992 General Assembly 

The commission submitted a proposal to revise the campaign finance law to require that a monetary 
contribution by an individual of more than $ 100 be made by personal check. This was overwhelmingly 
approved by the General Assembly. The commission also provided its input to the General Assembly 
on many other legislative proposals affecting elections. 

Affirmative Action Plan 

It is the policy and practice of the commission to ensure that no person will be discriminated against 
or be denied the benefits of any activity, program or employment process which receive public funds, 
in whole or in part. The commission is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and is 
strongly committed to all policies which will afford equal opportunity employment to all qualified 
persons without regard to race, color, religion, age, marital status, national origin, creed, ancestry, 
physical disability or blindness, criminal record, past or present history of mental disorder, mental 
retardation or sex. The commission has an approved affirmative action plan. 



24 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 



Office of the Attorney General 

RICHARD BLUMENTHAL, Attorney General 

Aaron S. Bayer, Deputy Attorney General 

Established -1897 Statutory authority - Sec. 3-124 to 3-131, 

Central Office - 55 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees -335 

Recurring operating expenses -1991-1992 - $13,489,986 

Capital outlay - $119,541 

Revenues Generated - $63,285,212 




The Attorney General's Office serves as legal counsel to all state agencies. State statutes and 
common law also give the Attorney General authority to act in the public interest. The Office 
ensures that state government acts within the letter and spirit of the law, preserving public resources, 
preventing unnecessary litigation and improving the quality of life for the people of Connecticut. 



Court cases completed 
Court cases pending 
Legal documents examined 
Informal advices 
Administrative proceedings 
Appeals completed 
Appeals pending 
Formal opinions rendered 



15,967 

19,015 

17,289 

11,888 

11,865 

158 

107 

35 



General Fund Revenue 



State Child Support Collections 

Tax Collection 

Collection from Oil Overcharge Litigation 

Collection from Veterans Estates 

Penalties for Environmental Violations 

Collection for Bureau of Collection Services 

Department of Income Maintenance Collection 

Miscellaneous Collections 

DOT Collection - Damage to State Property 

and Miscellaneous 
Antitrust civil penalties/attorneys fees 
Consumer Protection civil penalties/attorneys 
fees 
Charitable Trusts/Solicitations-Civil Penalties 



$41,434,336 
6,696,237 
3,258,452 
1,257,654 
1,388,127 
1,298,453 
562,508 
3,610,088 

220,781 
63,079 

120,909 
17,700 



Total Revenue Generated for State's General Fund 



$59,928,324 



Special Funds Revenue 

John Dempsey Hospital Collection 1 ,250, 1 68 

Second Injury Fund Collection 63 1 ,595 

Workers Compensation re State Employee Collection 328,244 
Unpaid Wage and Unemployment Tax 

Collection for Labor Department 437,969 

Total Revenue Generated for Special Funds $2,647,976 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 25 



Revenue Awarded or Paid to Consumers 

Consumer Restitution from Criminal Prosecution 78,400 
Antitrust Restitution/Consumer Protection 

Restitution 558,830 

Odometer Litigation 12,000 

Environmental Cleanup Costs 59,594 

Total Revenue Generated for Consumers $708,912 



This office saved the state $8.8 million in claimed tax refunds and challenged assessments. The 
Attorney General defended the state in numerous claims commission matters, personal injury cases, 
constitutional rights violation claims, condemnation and construction disputes and personnel matters. 
In addition, this office preserved $5.2 million in charitable funds that would otherwise have been 
dissipated or spent for non-charitable purposes. 

This office participated in the following cases affecting the state's economy: New York v. United 
States . Connecticut filed an amicus brief requesting the Supreme Court to strike down provisions of 
the 1985 Amendments to the Low-Level Radioactive Policy Act of 1980 which would have required 
the state and its taxpayers to assume title to and the tremendous cost responsibility for the disposal 
of low-level radioactive waste produced by private generators; a case defending the Navy's award of 
the second Seawolf Submarine contract to Electric Boat Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock 
Company v. United States Department of the Navy, upheld the Seawolf contract award to Electric 
Boat. Finally, this office filed an antitrust action against the Newell Company asserting that its 
planned acquisition of the Stanley Works would be an ti -competitive and violate antitrust laws. That 
action is pending. 

This office has initiated efforts to improve the integrity and efficiency of the state's contracting 
process, these efforts included investigations by the Attorney General's Office into allegations of 
wrongdoing or contracting improprieties, and attempts to establish a systematic sharing by state 
agencies of information concerning contractors' performance problems, violations of state law, and 
penalties or debts owed to the state. 

Legislation, Communications and Administration 

During the 1992 General Assembly session, bills were passed which: (1) require car titles to 
indicate that the vehicle was returned under the Lemon Law; (2) require a warning label on toys 
marketed for ages three to seven which contain small parts; (3) prohibit unlicensed loan brokers from 
charging advance fees; and (4) require physicians to notify patients that they hold a financial interest 
in any therapeutic company to which the patient is being referred. Approval of landmark solid waste 
legislation which will facilitate enforcement efforts was obtained. The Attorney General testified in 
support of bills on auto insurance reform, establishing a workers' compensation fraud unit and child 
support enforcement. 

During the last fiscal year 38 whistleblower files were opened and 23 closed. 

Antitrust-Consumer Protection Department 

This department administers the Connecticut Antitrust Act and has authority to enforce provisions 
of federal antitrust laws. It represents the Department of Consumer Protection and occupational 
licensing boards and commissions. It initiates litigation for consumers under the Federal Odometer 
Act, and is responsible for administration of a portion of Connecticut's Lemon Law. 

During the past year, the department successfully participated as amicus curiae in the following 
cases, Eastman Kodak Co. v. Image Technical Service, Inc. . reaffirming the illegality of tying 
arrangements; Cheshire Mortg a ge Services. Inc. v. Monies , in which the Connecticut Supreme Court 
established the standards for illegality of unfair practices under the Connecticut Unfair Trade 
Practices Act; United States v. Tobacco Valley Sanitation the department established that exhibits in 
criminal antitrust trials are not converted into confidential grand jury materials upon the acquittal of 
the defendants. The department has used these exhibits to prepare an antitrust case against commercial 
trash haulers in Connecticut. 

The department participated, along with 12 other states, in a case against GMAC Mortgage Corp. 
concerning mortgage escrow account collection practices. More than 5,000 Connecticut consumers 
will receive adjustments or refunds totaling approximately $1.5 million. 



26 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

The department sued Nu Skin, a multi-level marketing company, and as a result, eliminated the 
alleged unfair or deceptive marketing of its products, and obtained payment to the state of $85,000. 

The department also actively participated in challenges to the practices of TRW and Equifax, two 
of the largest credit reporting agencies in the United States. These actions, coordinated with 18 other 
states, resulted in the reformation of the credit reporting agencies ' duties to the public to provide more 
accurate information. Litigation against Global Services Ltd., an employment service, permanently 
banned Global from operating anywhere in the world. 

Finally, the department sued Allied Marketing Group, doing business as Sweepstakes Clearing- 
house, alleging that Allied misled customers by billing them for calls made to a 1-800 number 
described as free. The case is landmark in nature because it deals with the new interactive technology, 
which permits unscrupulous companies to bilk consumers who call 1-800 numbers, thinking their 
calls are free. The office also sought restrictions on 1-900 services which prey on telephone users 
through credit card and sweepstakes scams. 

Child Protection Department 

This department represents the Department of Children and Youth Services (DCYS) principally 
in juvenile abuse and neglect proceedings. 

During the past year, the department had a number of important cases. In In re Alexander V.. the 
Appellate Court ruled that there is no legal requirement to conduct competency hearings in 
termination proceedings. In federal court, a class action against DCYS regarding special education 
services was dismissed, W. G. v. Senator e . Finally, the department filed a motion to reopen the consent 
decree in the child welfare reform class action, Juan F. v. O'Neill . As a result, significant progress 
has been made with the panel and DCYS to implement child welfare reforms. 

Environment Department 

The Environment Department represents the state's Environmental Protection (DEP), Economic 
Development and Agriculture agencies. The department's most important victory was in the case 
against L&S Construction Company (L&S) and its owners. L&S engaged in massive illegal dumping 
of construction debris at several locations in Connecticut. The court awarded a civil penalty of $1.03 
million, the largest civil penalty yet assessed by a Connecticut court in an environmental case and 
ordered extensive corrective action by L&S. In both the water pollution and hazardous waste areas, 
this office brought many actions to require businesses to cease polluting, to pay civil penalties for their 
violations, and, in some cases, to perform compensatory environmental functions in the future. 

The Attorney General's office represented the DEP in numerous administrative hearings involving 
all areas of water pollution, wetlands protection, air pollution and hazardous waste. One of the most 
important hearings resulted in a cease and desist order issued by the Department of Environmental 
Protection against Polymer Resources, Inc. concerning air emissions which were endangering the 
health of residents in the surrounding neighborhood. The department continued its work with other 
states in various federal cases to control national air pollution problems and to force the United States 
Environmental Protection Agency to meet its statutory duties to enforce laws against pollution. 

The Department of Environmental Protection is one of the largest landowners in the state, and this 
office represented the Department of Environmental Protection in 51 real estate transactions valued 
at $8.5 million dollars. This department also represented the Department of Environmental Protection 
in legal matters concerning Native Americans. 

Finance and Public Utilities Department 

This Department provides legal services for state agencies regulating insurance, banking, securi- 
ties, and public utilities as well as the Department of Revenue Services, the Treasurer, the 
Comptroller, the Office of Policy and Management, the Bond Commission and several smaller 
agencies. 

With passage of the income tax, the complexity of state and business tax issues has increased. In 
Quill Corp. v. North Dakota a challenge to the application of the sales and use tax to mail order 
companies was heard by the United States Supreme Court. This department filed an amicus brief for 
Connecticut and 33 other states. Gallacher v. Commissioner of Revenue Services involved the First 
Amendment and the taxation of newspapers. The successful defense of the Gallacher case protected 
substantial future state revenues. 

This department is presently involved in two U.S. Supreme Court suits between the states. 
Connecticut v. New Hampshire is a challenge to New Hampshire's property tax on the Seabrook 
Nuclear Power Station, which tax violates the Constitution by shifting the burden of the tax to out- 
of-state taxpayers. Delaware v. New York involves the rights of the states to unclaimed dividend and 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 27 

interest payments held by brokerage firms and securities clearing houses. 

At the request of the Department of Banking and working with the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation (FDIC), this office filed lawsuits to close 14 state-chartered banks and to have the FDIC 
appointed receiver. Its attorneys provided counsel for the Bridgeport Financial Review Board and the 
West Haven Finance Planning and Assistance Board on many complex issues affecting these cities. 
In the past year, the department resolved actions against two check cashing services and an unlicensed 
second mortgage loan broker and undertook a lengthy investigation of the sale of fraudulent health 
care plans. The department represented the Department of Public Utility Control in the merger of 
Northeast Utilities and the Public Service Company of New Hampshire. 

Child Support Department 

This department provides legal services on behalf of the Bureau of Child Support Enforcement 
(DHR) and the Support Enforcement Division of the Superior Court. The department handled more 
than 1 1,200 new court referrals and closed out nearly 9,700 cases, representing increases over last 
year's levels of 10 percent and 20 percent, respectively. The department received 4,398 new paternity 
cases during the year, closed out 4,132 and obtained nearly 2,700 determinations, an increase of 35 
percent. In addition, department attorneys made more than 9,700 court appearances in interstate 
support cases under the Uniform Reciprocal Enforcement of Support Act. 

The Child Support Department participated in a number of significant appeals. The Connecticut 
Supreme Court in Perry v. Perry upheld the constitutionality of the process which allows Family 
Support Magistrates to order the incarceration of obligors who are found in contempt of support orders 
when they have the demonstrated ability to pay. In Turner v. Turner, the Supreme Court ruled that 
the statute that allows child support orders to be modified if they substantially deviate from 
Connecticut's Child Support Guidelines may be retrospectively applied. In Vickery v. Vic leery, the 
Connecticut Appellate Court ruled that the Child Support Guidelines had been incorporated by 
reference into the General Statutes after their adoption by the Guidelines Commission. 

The Attorney General 's Office worked closely with the Department of Human Resources to ensure 
that the federal performance standards for the child support program, incorporated into Connecticut 
law, were being met. 

Labor Relations Department 

The Department of Labor Relations handles all Occupational Safety and Health Act, wage and 
hour, mediation, arbitration, retirement, and personnel matters. Significant resources were dedicated 
to court actions, administrative actions, and informal written and oral advice concerning employee 
furloughs, layoffs and retirements resulting from the state's budget difficulties. 

The department obtained a judgment in federal court dismissing a claim that the state discriminated 
on the basis of sex in its appointment of women to positions in state service, Valenti v. Department 
of Labor, et al . The department obtained a judgement vacating an arbitration award reinstating a state 
employee who was terminated for embezzling state funds. The Appellate Court agreed that 
reinstatement violated public policy, State v. Council 4. AFSCME. In a case of first impression 
concerning overtime payments, the Connecticut Supreme Court held that the commission earnings 
requirement of the exemption to statutory overtime pay in Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 31-76i(g) extended 
to compensation for performance of services, as well as sales, Roto -Rooter Service Co. v. Department 
of Labor . 

Several cases before the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission were resolved. 
Settlement agreements were reached in seven cases requiring safety measures by employers and 
payment of penalties and nine complaints were filed. 

Public Safety and Special Revenue Department 

This unit represents the state departments of Public Safety, Correction, Special Revenue, Liquor 
Control and several smaller agencies. Attorneys continue to successfully defend lawsuits challenging 
conditions of confinement in correctional facilities. In the case of Asherman v. Meachum . the United 
States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit en banc upheld Connecticut's position that a 
prisoner on Supervised Home Release had no protectable constitutional rights in remaining in the 
community. 

The office continued to successfully defend against claims that Connecticut law restricting 
eligibility for community release programs for dangerous prisoners are unconstitutional ex post facto 
laws. Thirteen separate lawsuits filed against the Connecticut State Police alleging that the State 
Police illegally recorded telephone conversations without the knowledge of either party to the 
conversations are continuing. 



28 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

The department advises the Governor, the Department of Special Revenue and other state agencies 
on the regulation of casino gambling at the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe pursuant to the Indian Gaming 
Regulatory Act. 

Transportation, Housing and Public Works Department 

This department provides representation for the Departments of Transportation (DOT), Public 
Works, Administrative Services, Motor Vehicles, Housing, The Connecticut Historical Commission 
and the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service. Legal services directly related to major 
public works programs, especially the Transportation Infrastructure Renewal Program have been in 
demand. In addition to contract construction matters, various environmental matters associated with 
such projects are involved. As a result of this construction program, the DOT has made significant 
land acquisitions. Department legal assistance has been provided to the DOT in these matters. In 
Greene vs. Commissioner of Transportation the trial court ordered property owners to pay the state 
$430,000.00 because of overpayments for property. 

This department also works to enforce the state's implied consent law on drunk driving. Since the 
effective date of the new administrative "per se" license suspension provisions, the number of appeals 
being defended by this department has increased from approximately 10 to approximately 100 per 
year. 

Special Litigation Department 

This department represents the Governor, the Judicial Department, the General Assembly, the 
Secretary of the State, the Auditors of Public Accounts, the state Elections Enforcement Commission, 
the state Ethics Commission, the state Properties Review Board, the Judicial Selection Commission, 
the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO) and the Office of Protection and 
Advocacy for Handicapped and Developmentally Disabled Persons. 

With respect to housing matters, this department provides legal services to the CHRO. In addition, 
through its Public Charities Unit, the department protects the public interest in gifts, bequests and 
devises for charitable purposes; and in cooperation with the Department of Consumer Protection, 
administers and enforces state laws regulating charities and professional fund raisers who solicit from 
the public. 

In Fonfara v. Reapportionment Commission , the Connecticut Supreme Court upheld a plan for 
reapportionment of the state House of Representatives against a claim that the plan violated the town 
integrity principle of article third, Sec. 4 of the Connecticut Constitution. In Canning v. Lens ink , the 
Connecticut Supreme Court ruled that there is no right to a jury in an action for damages brought 
against the Commissioner of Mental Retardation under Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 19a- 24. In Miko v. 
Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities , the Connecticut Supreme Court upheld a decision 
of a hearing officer appointed by the CHRO which had found that a complainant had been denied 
housing in violation of Conn. Gen. Stat. Sec. 46a-64a because she had a child. In addition, this 
department played an important role in the office's participation as amicus curiae in 22 cases before 
the United States Supreme Court. 

The Attorney General's Public Charities Unit filed several significant cases in a continuing effort 
to fight fraud in charitable solicitations. 

The number of soliciting charitable organizations monitored by the Public Charities Unit grew to 
4,118 charities, an increase of more than 50 percent in three years. To help inform the public, the fifth 
annual survey was released of paid telephone soliciting by Connecticut charities, civic, police and 
firefighter organizations. It showed that of $8.9 million donated to professional telephone solicitors, 
only $2.6 million (29 percent) reached the organizations to which our citizens thought they were 
giving. 

Collections and Revenue Enhancement Department 

This department represents the Department of Administrative Services, Bureau of Collection 
Services, as well as certain collection activities of the Department of Income Maintenance, the Labor 
Department, the John Dempsey Hospital, the Second Injury Fund, the Revenue Services Department, 
the Connecticut State University, the Department of Higher Education, the Secretary of the State and 
other state agencies. 

In fiscal year 1991-1992, the total revenue collected by the department was $5,795,394.89, while 
it disposed of 1,1 13 cases. In addition to these cash receipts, security interests totaling $1,307,851.42 
were acquired by the department in the form of judgment liens, mortgages and statutory liens. 

The department's mission is to recover monies that are owed the State of Connecticut. In In Re 



ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 29 

Golden Distributors the department successfully opposed an injunction against Connecticut's effort 
to collect excise taxes on tobacco sales resulting in a $340,000 recovery to Connecticut. It also 
protected the state's interest in In re TIE. Communications, a. major bankruptcy, which will result 
in annual payments to the state of approximately $630,000 over the next five years. In Overnig ht 
Transportation Company v. Tianti the department upheld the Connecticut Labor Department's right 
to recover unpaid overtime wages on behalf of Connecticut trucking dock loaders against a claim that 
Connecticut's overtime laws were preempted by other less inclusive federal statutes. 

Health and Human Services Department 

The Health and Human Services Department saw an increased level of activity throughout the year 
as the issues surrounding health cost containment and delivery of human services became increasingly 
significant. 

In the licensing area the Court upheld the Chiropractic Board's composition and its procedures. 
Jesse Jutkowitz v. Department of Health Services, et al . Also, actions were brought on behalf of the 
Department of Health Services to enforce the quality of care standards in licensed facilities. The 
department monitored, on behalf of the Department of Health Services, a number of situations in 
which the operators of nursing homes were in financial jeopardy , and intervened in foreclosure actions 
to protect patients being cared for in these institutions. 

The Commission on Hospitals and Health Care (CHHC) required counseling and assistance in a 
number of major proceedings. A major certificate of need application involved that of Newington 
Children's Hospital and its move from the Newington location to that adjacent to Hartford Hospital. 

The mental health area saw increased demand for services concerning the rights of patients and 
access to facilities. A significant case for the State of Connecticut was Bethpage Lutheran Services. 
Inc. v. Lowell P. Weicker. Jr.. et al. A corporation sued under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 to have their rates 
increased by over $400,000.00 for a series of community living arrangements for the mentally 
retarded under the Medicaid Program. Our motion to dismiss was granted by the district court and 
upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. 

The department initiated an action on behalf of the Department of Income Maintenance against the 
U.S. Departmentof Agriculture, successfully reinstating a reimbursement of approximately $150,000. 
Ct. Department of Income Maintenance v. U.S. Department of Agriculture . 

Finally, there were a number of actions involving child care. These adjudications were brought on 
behalf of the Department of Health Services or the Department of Human Resources and related to 
the license of the facility to operate. 

Education and Mental Retardation Department 

This department represents the Board of Education, the University of Connecticut, State Universities 
and Technical Colleges, related commissions and boards and the Department of Mental Retardation 
(DMR). In State Board of Education v. City ofWaterbury . the department obtained a court order 
requiring the city to implement a racially balanced redis trie ting plan for the 1992- 1 993 academic year. 
Mihalcikv. Lensink is a civil rights class action claiming that mentally retarded persons at Connecticut 
Valley Hospital are being denied their rights to appropriate training and treatment. The department 
worked on a bi-weekly basis to assure that all class members are placed in proper programs in proper 
settings. In Richardsonv. Connecticut Community Services. Inc. the department brought Connecticut's 
first-ever receivership action against a financially irresponsible provider that ran several group homes 
for the mentally retarded. 

In re Community Associates. Inc. the provider organization operating 14 group homes filed for 
bankruptcy. This department worked with the bankruptcy court to forge a satisfactory resolution for 
the benefit of the DMR clients served by the debtor. 

The department represented the University of Connecticut in numerous cases highlighted by the 
gay and lesbian association's challenge to military recruiters on campus, an age discrimination case 
by three law school professors and an EPA administrative proceeding involving asbestos removal. 
The contractreview process, particularly because of the increasingly complex world of intercollegiate 
athletics, has been increased by the inclusion of corporate sponsorship and broadcast agreements. 

Workers' Compensation Department 

The department represents the state treasurer as the custodian of the Second Injury Fund, the 
Workers' Compensation Commission and the Department of Administrative Services in its capacity 
as administrator of the state employees' workers' compensation program. The department represents 
the state in contested state employee workers' compensation claims and the Second Injury Fund in 



30 ELECTED STATE OFFICIALS 

cases involving potential liability on the part of the fund. The number of appearances before the 
Workers' Compensation Commissioners by department attorneys and paralegals increased by 48 
percent over last year's total. The department participated in over 1,300 pre-hearing review 
conferences. 

The department participated in several important appeals, including Stuart v. Department of Cor- 
rection , wherein the court held that enhanced benefits are not required unless the employee is actually 
engaged in certain enumerated duties at the time of the injury. In Vanzant v. Hall, the court clarified 
the type of work in or about a private dwelling that is subject to workers' compensation coverage. 

Criminal Prosecutions 

The Attorney General, in cooperation with the chief state' s attorney, initiated criminal prosecutions 
based on 65 consumer complaints against home improvement contractors. Twenty -eight complaints 
ended in convictions and four ended with probation under the accelerated rehabilitation program. In 
all, consumer restitution of $78,489 was ordered paid. 

Affirmative Action 

The Office of Attorney General attempts to develop equal employment opportunities through its 
affirmative action program. By the end of the fiscal year, 36.9 percent of the full-time attorney 
workforce consisted of women and minorities. Women and minorities composed 66.7 percent of entry 
level attorneys and 33.3 percent of middle and high level attorneys. 




POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



Office of Policy and Management 

WILLIAM J. C1BES, JR., Secretary 

Lorraine M. Aronson Deputy Secretary 

Established - 1977 Statutory authority - Sec. 4-65a 

Central office - 80 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 229 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - General Funds - $76,234,261; 

Grant Funds - $63,942,910; 

Organization structure - Office of the Secretary, Information and Technology, 

Budget and Financial Management Division, Intergovernmental Policy Division, 

Management and Performance Division, and Policy Development and Planning 

Division 
• 

The office of Policy and Management (OPM) serves as a staff agency reporting directly to the 
Governor. It is divided into four divisions: the Budget and Financial Division, which projects 
the state budget and directs all agencies in the Program budget process; the Policy Development and 
Planning Division, which coordinates agency policy to promote comprehensive statewide planning 
and policy development; the Intergovernmental Policy Division, which oversees municipal and 
federal relations; the Management and Evaluation Division, which assists agencies in setting 
management standards and reporting systems to promote operational effectiveness and accountabil- 
ity; and the Office of Information and Technology, which coordinates the state's telecommunication 
system. 



Budget and Financial Management Division 

Edward C. Balda, Executive Budget Officer 

The Budget and Financial Management Division is responsible for the development and implemen- 
tation of the state's fiscal and program policies through the formulation of the Governor's Budget and 
the execution of the budget as enacted by the General Assembly. 

Some of the activities performed by the division in support of its responsibilities include: 
development of policy recommendations based on the Governor's priorities and concerns through the 
identification and analysis of issues facing the state and the development and evaluation of alternative 
courses of actions; management of the state budget implementation to ensure consistency with 
established policy and legislative intent; development of long-term plans to assure the future fiscal 
integrity of the state; the dynamic refinement of program budget development as a management tool; 
the development of statewide financial strategic analysis, tax policy and program evaluation; 
development of the statewide collective bargaining policy and strategy; development of the statewide 
capital policy through the preparation and implementation of the state Bond Commission's monthly 
agenda; monthly analysis of the statewide financial plan including revenues and expenditures; and 
financial analysis of proposed legislation. 

The division annually produces the Governor's budget document, the Governor's budget summary 
and the economic report of the Governor. 

Budget Execution 1 99 1 -92: The 1 992 fiscal year ended with a General Fund operating surplus, after 
miscellaneous adjustments, of $1 10.2 million. In accordance with Public Act 91-3 of the June 1991 
Special Session, the entire surplus will be used to accelerate the repayment of notes in the Economic 
Recovery Fund. The surplus was a result of both revenue collections which were above estimates and 
expenditures which were below budgeted appropriations. 



32 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



33 



The following schedule summarizes what occurred in the General Fund and the Special Transpor- 
tation Fund for fiscal year 1991-92: 







uovernors 


Change 


General 




Recommended 




Assembly 


General Fund 








Budgeted Revenues 


7,266.1 


55.3 


7,321.4 


Appropriations (Net) 


7,266.1 


51.6 


7,317.7 


Balance June 30, 1993 


-- 


3.7 


3.7 


Special Transportation 


Fund 






Balance June 30, 1992 


20.1 


(4.7) 


15.4 


Revenues 


7373 


(28.2) 


709.1 


Appropriations (Net) 


746.1 


(41.4) 


704.7 


Balance June 30, 1993 


11.3 


8.5 


19.8 


Capital Bonding 


997.9 


(107.6) 


8903* 


♦Net new authorizationa including $244.1 in 


Special Tax Obligation Bonds 


and $30 million in revenue bonds for the Clean Water Fund. 




All numbers are in milli 


ons 







The following schedule summarizes the Governor's Recommendation and the General Assembly's 
enactment of the 1990-91 state budget. 





Budget Plan 


Actual 


Difference 


General Fund 








Revenues 


$7,3493* 


$7389.4 


$40.1 


Expenditures 


7336.5* 


7,276.6 


(59.9) 


Misc. Adjustments 


-- 


(2.6) 


(2.6) 


Balance - 1991-92 


12.8 


110.2 


97.4 


Special Transportation Fund 








Revenues 


651.0 


634.2 


(16.8) 


Expenditures 


658.5 


642.4 


(16.1) 


Surplus July 1, 1991 


23.2 


23.2 


- 


Misc. Adjustments 


•• 


0.4 


0.4 


Balance 1991-92 


15.7 


15.4 


(03) 


♦Includes the $3673 million appropriated to the 


Department 


of Income 


Maintenance for payment to the Department of Mental Health for low income 


disproportionate share costs in 


state institutions. 






All numbers are in millions 









Office of Information and Technology 

John H. Bennett, Executive Director 

The mission of the Office of Information and Technology is threefold: 1) to develop and maintain 
the state's telecommunication infrastructure, and the associated standards for voice and data 
communications; 2) to develop and implement planning and control procedures which enhance the 
efficiency and effectiveness with which state agencies use information technology; and 3) to assist 
the agencies in evaluating and using information technology. 

The office requires annual Information Technology Plans from each of the state agencies, as well 
as a plan for information technology related spending. These plans are used to determine what 
technologies will be of strategic value to the agencies, and what can be done to improve the 
effectiveness with which these technologies are used. 

Annually the office produces a Strategic Plan for Information Technologies. This plan sets forth 
the direction the state maximize the benefits achieved through the of information technology. It also 



34 OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 

summarizes the standards and guidelines currently in place, and indicates additional areas in which 
standards are required. 

The office is also responsible for assisting and advising both state and municipal agencies on 
technology matters relating to the public's right of access to publicly held data. 



Policy Development and Planning Division 

Susan Shimelman, Under Secretary 

The Policy Development and Planning Division (PDPD) was created in January 1991, in a 
reorganization that was designed to allow the Office of Policy and Management to respond more 
effectively to its designated role as the Governor's staff agency for state policy development and 
planning. The previous functions of comprehensive planning, justice planning and energy policy and 
planning were combined under the direction of one under secretary. Units have been established to 
address human services and economic development planning; physical resources, energy and capital 
planning; grants management and justice planning; and long term care. More recently, abureauof real 
property management has been created in the division. 

The Human Services and the Economic Development cabinets are the division's key tools to further 
interagency policy development and coordinated planning in the human services and economic 
development areas. These cabinets were created to respond to the challenges facing state government 
that require an immediate and a sustained focus on issues in these two distinct but interrelated spheres . 

The Human Services Cabinet, chaired by the Lieutenant Governor, consists of commissioners and 
agency heads of 18 state human services agencies. Major issues addressed by the cabinet include the 
reorganization of human services agencies, the identification of priority health care issues, welfare 
reform, the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and human capital development. 
The Economic Development Cabinet, chaired by the Governor's deputy chief of staff, includes 14 
commissioners and agency heads involved or interested in economic development issues. The agenda 
for the cabinet has included a business marketing campaign for Connecticut, promotion of exports, 
and business expansion in urban areas, defense dependency, analysis of the new 1990 census 
information, and the anticipated impacts on business of the Clean Air Act. 

In addition, quarterly joint meetings of the Human Services and Economic Development cabinets 
address such cross-cutting issues as human capital development, total quality management in 
government, state personnel, and the cost of the health care system and its economic impact. The 
Strategic Information System (SIS) is another tool, which is designed to improve the quality of policy 
development and planning at OPM . The goal of SIS is to provide state policymakers with information 
that will enhance their ability to make better informed policy and program decisions. The initial base 
of SIS is the integration of 1990 census data and agency program/fiscal data into a database 
management system. SIS also incorporates the State Census Data Center, housed in the division, 
which is the lead agency in Connecticut for the dissemination and promotion of census data in 
cooperation with the U.S. Census Bureau. 

To place capital allocation decisions in a broader public policy and program planning perspective, 
a Bureau of Real Property Management has been created within the division to develop and 
recommend plans for the appropriate use of state real property consistent with the state's long range 
capital and program plans. The bureau also evaluates the level of efficiency of use of state real property 
under the control of state agencies. To accomplish these tasks, the bureau oversees the development 
of a comprehensive updated inventory of state real property, conducts a review of agency use of 
existing real property and facilitates agency-based master planning efforts. In addition, the division 
develops a five-year comprehensive plan for the state's capital program, which is a blueprint for how 
state capital funds will be allocated. The plan recommends funding for the leased facilities that are 
needed to carry out agency programs. 

The Conservation and Development Policies Plan for Connecticut, prepared by the division and 
approved by the legislature, is the basic policy guide for the division's review of state agency 
programmatic plans and capital funding requests . The revised plan, adopted in May 1 992, will be more 
instrumental in capital and land use planning, since conformity with the plan is now mandatory for 
all state projects of $100,000 or more. Input to the plan in its draft stage was solicited through a series 
of meetings throughout the state. Other review activities take place in the division under the 
Connecticut Environmental Policy Act and within the context of various water resources planning 
activities. The division continues to coordinate water resources planning among the pertinent state 
water resource agencies and serves as state coordinator with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 
Coordination focused on implementation of water conservation measures and the maintenance 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 35 



dredging of the state's navigable harbors and waterways. The division's past year review activities 
can be summarized as follows: 

Plan and Project Reviews: 

State Agency Plans 20 

Industrial and Business Development Projects 8 

CT Environmental Policy Act Documents 14 

National Environmental Policy Act Documents 1 1 
State Actions for consistency with Plan of Conservation 

and Development/State Facility Plans 438 

Small Cities Grant Applications 26 

Water Diversion Permit Applications 6 

Earlier this year, responsibility for federal and state review processes was split between the 
Intergovernmental Policy Division and the Policy Development and Planning Division (PDPD), with 
PDPD retaining responsibility for the state reviews. During this past year, PDPD performed a total 
of 14 reviews pursuant to the Connecticut Environmental Policies Act and eight Industrial and 
Business Development Reviews. 

The division also leads an interagency working group on the state's response to the federal Clean 
Air Amendments of 1990. Topics explored included transportation and air quality linkages and an 
emissions credit trading program that will be needed to enable economic growth to occur while 
meeting emission reduction requirements. In addition, a draft master plan was prepared for housing 
and related development at the former Mansfield Training School, calling for the staged construction 
of a new "village" at the site. An Environmental Impact Evaluation will now be prepared for the 
development. The division facilitates state and regional program coordination and administers the 
state's regional planning organization grant-in-aid program. In the energy policy and planning area, 
the division is coordinating the state's need for energy sources that are reliable, affordable and 
environmentally benign. The division promotes the diversification of energy supply and the 
improvement in the efficient use of energy in all sectors. It administers federal energy conservation 
grants and petroleum settlement funds, disbursements to states (as a result of federal litigation) which 
are used for a number of energy -related purposes. The division also coordinates the activities of 
various state agencies involved in the management of low-level radioactive waste. The division 
monitors gas and petroleum supplies and prices, forecasts energy demand and cost, and assesses state 
energy needs. The division staffs the Connecticut Energy Advisory Board, composed of state agency 
commissioners and private sector appointees, which makes recommendations for bringing the energy 
supply and demand into balance. In the justice planning area, the Prison and Jail Overcrowding 
Commission, composed of commissioners and agency heads in both the judicial and executive 
branches, is the interagency mechanism to coordinate the state's $1 billion, 6,000-bed prison 
expansion and efforts to create meaningful alternatives to incarceration with an aim of saving 4,000 
prison beds per day by 1993. 

The division staffs the commission and also works to increase the effectiveness of Connecticut's 
criminal and juvenile justice systems by administering the distribution of several state and federal 
criminal justice grant programs totaling more than $20 million a year. It also coordinates several 
multi-agency programs and initiatives, including anti-drug initiatives, particularly in the areas of 
prevention and enforcement. Major drug enforcement initiatives have been undertaken through the 
administration of federal Drug Control and System Improvement block grant funds and the state Drug 
Enforcement Program. The Narcotics Enforcement and Crime Control Committee, which develops 
a state strategy for the use of these federal funds, and the state's Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee 
are both staffed by the division. Drug education in schools is stressed through the allocation of state 
drug enforcement dollars, as well as Federal Drug Free Schools and Communities grant money. The 
division also administered the Federal Crime Victims Assistance program, which funds direct 
services to victims of child abuse, domestic violence, sexual assault, homicide, and drunk driving. The 
Connecticut Partnership for Long Term Care is a major division initiative involving a public/private 
partnership to finance nursing home and community based services for the frail elderly and disabled. 
The partnership has received national recognition for its innovative and creative approach to a critical 
health care cost containment issue. A five-year demonstration project has been approved that will 
allow Connecticut residents to purchase long-term care insurance and protects a dollar of their assets 
for every dollar their insurance pays out in state-approved benefits. The insurance program allows a 
person, a person requiring nursing home care, which averages $50,000 a year, to avoid exhausting 



36 OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



ch 



nearly all their savings before they are eligible for state-supported Medicaid benefits to pay for such 
care. One of the major activities of the division in the human services area the next year will be 
implementing the reorganization of health and human services in Connecticut. Last year, the 
division staffed the Commission to Effect Government Reorganization and three of its five task 
forces . The Human Services Task Force recommended the consolidation of the programs of 1 1 state 
human services agencies into four agencies in order to improve the coordination, accountability, and 
cost-effectiveness of the state's health and human services system. This proposal was passed by the 
legislature in Special Act 92-20 and signed by the Governor. In addition, the division will be 
directing a study of the purchase of human services in Connecticut, another recommendation that 
was implemented by the General Assembly from the Commission to Effect Government Reorga- 
nization. The Connecticut Information for State Health Policy Project was developed and initiated 
by the division to improve the health care statistics system in the state to better inform the health 
policy making process. The project is a unique collaboration between the executive and legislative 
branches of government and is supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The 
Office of Policy and Management is the lead agency for the planning phase of the project and is 
coordinating the activities of participating state agencies and representatives of the Connecticut 
General Assembly, the private sector, non-profit organizations, and the medical community. Early 
childhood service system, including child care, the Birth To Three Initiative for infants and toddlers 
with disabilities, Head Start, and preschool services were expanded and enhanced through activities 
supported by the work of the division. The Connecticut Energy Assistance Program (CEAP) Plan 
was prepared and submitted to the legislature. In the development of the plan for this $29.5 million 
program, many critical policy decisions were negotiated with state agencies that administer this 
program, as well as various industry, advocacy and community organizations. 

The division worked with other divisions of OPM to explore with local officials urban problems 
and to define potential urban strategies to support the work of the Economic Development Cabinet' s 
city work group. A definition of "distressed municipalities" is being developed in conjunction with 
OPM's Intergovernmental Policy Division. 



Intergovernmental Policy Division 

Douglas M. Cutler, Under Secretary 

This division functions as a conduit for intergovernmental communications by gathering and 
disseminating information concerning the needs of local governments, programs of assistance 
available to local governments, actions and legislation at the federal level which affects the state and 
its municipalities. The division provides technical planning, management, and budgeting assistance 
to municipalities in the area of taxation. The division also is responsible for promoting the state's 
interest at the federal level and for maximizing federal funding and revenue available to the state. 
The division advises the secretary on matters concerning local governments and urban policy and 
proposes legislation relating to auditing and budget procedures, local assessment, sale/assessment 
ratios, tax relief for elderly, veterans and persons with disabilities, property taxation and local 
government powers. The division staffs the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations 
(ACIR) and the Municipal Finance Advisory Commission (MFAC). Staff consultants provide 
technical assistance to town officials, disseminate information on 15 statutory formula grants that 
collectively allocates $1.4 billion to the towns, analyzes and summarizes legislation which has an 
impact on municipalities, and provides information concerning state aidprograms for municipalities. 
Staff also provide support for the state' s assistance programs to public agencies applying for disaster 
relief through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. 

Staff prepare technical reports for use by municipal officials, including the "Municipal Digest: 
State Administered Financial and Technical Aid Programs," a compendium of state assistance 
available to municipalities; the annual "Estimates of State Aid to Municipalities: Statutory Formula 
Grants"; "Statutes Governing Municipal Planning and Zoning"; "Statutes Governing Municipal 
Assessment and Tax Collection"; and "Fiscal Indicators." 

State-Local Policy Development Section 

This section performs the background research and recommendations regarding the state's 
relationship with its municipalities with particular emphasis on communities needing state invest- 
ments. Staff prepares the annual "Estimates of State Aid to Municipalities" and its post session 
update. Staff also studies major issues which have state-local interface components, such as the 
current study of state mandates on municipalities. 

This section has: (1) staffed a major study of state statutory and regulatory mandates on 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 37 

municipalities and the legislative process for considering potential new mandates; (2) developed the 
proposals for a set of initiatives on state programs to identify and assist communities in particular need 
- the Public Investment Community Program; and (3) provided staff and data processing support to 
other divisions and agencies seeking input on grant and other aid alternatives for municipalities. 

Federal/State Affairs-Revenue Maximization Section 

This section is responsible for analyzing federal legislation and the federal budget to determine the 
impact on the state and identifying areas where federal statutory changes would benefit the state. It 
also identifies grant opportunities that could benefit the state and coordinates interagency efforts to 
apply for such assistance. During 1992, it assumed the responsibility for the Intergovernmental 
Review Process for federal program applications, state agency federal grant requests, environmental 
impact reviews, and direct federal development actions. In addition, this section is responsible for 
identifying, examining and initiating new federal revenue enhancement efforts; and coordinating and 
overseeing agency efforts to implement revenue enhancement efforts. 

During 1991-1992, this section coordinated Medicaid refinancing efforts across five human service 
agencies including coordinating the development of Connecticut's effort to maximize Medicaid 
revenue from disproportionate share payments made to the Department of Mental Health and to 
hospitals from the newly created Uncompensated Care Pool funded through an assessment levied on 
hospitals. 

The Intergovernmental Review Process activity for the year, including part of the year when the 
function was in the Policy Development and Planning Division was: 
Federal Financial Assistance Applications: 467 

State Federal Funding Applications: 83 

Direct Federal Development Applications: 1 1 

Municipal Finance Services Section 

The Municipal Finance Services Section is responsible for monitoring all aspects of local 
governmental accounting, auditing, and financial reporting in the state. The unit is responsible for 
reviewing all municipal financial reports submitted to the secretary and maintains liaison with local 
municipal officials, Independent Public Accountants, and professional organizations. The section 
provides staff support to the Municipal Finance Advisory Commission which is responsible for 
identifying and assisting municipalities that have been identified as having fiscal problems. With the 
audit information submitted by the state's 1 69 municipalities, the section prepares "Municipal Fiscal 
Indicators" booklet, which identifies and analyzes selected fiscal trends of each municipality for the 
most recent past five years. This section is also responsible for approving each municipality's 
independent public accountant and granting audit extensions to such accountants when necessary. It 
provides technical assistance to town officials and auditors and provides an audit guide and 
questionnaire which must accompany the audit. 

The section also develops numerous publications of a statistical and professional nature, which are 
disseminated to local government officials and professional practitioners. 

Finally, this section also staffs the Bridgeport Financial Review Board and the West Haven Finance 
Planning and Assistance Board. The boards were created by special acts of the state legislature, which 
gave the boards significant review and approval powers with respect to the finances of these two cities. 

Data Collection and Grants Management Section 

The mission of this section is to collect municipal data, and process and certify payments of various 
municipal grants. The section reaches out to each municipality in the state to assist officials solving 
key problems. Staff administer the Local Capital Improvement Program ($140 million), and the 
Telecommunication Property Tax Program ($37.9 million). Staff prepared a plan for administering 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Public Assistance Program for the July 10, 1989 
tornado, processed requests and reviewed claims from municipalities for the Local Emergency Relief 
Advisory Program ($4 million). Staff participated in the scheduled Nuclear Exercises held under 
Federal Emergency Management Agency/Nuclear Regulatory Commission auspices Emergency 
Response Commission. 

The section aids local governments in matters relating to assessment and taxation of property and 
compiles data on special districts. Staff administer and certify the payment of various grants to local 
governments: Unrestricted Grants to Municipalities (S35.5 million), the Payments-in-Lieu-of-Taxes 
(PILOT) on state owned property grant (520.2 million), the Payments-in-Lieu-of-Taxes (PILOT) on 
private colleges and general hospitals ($41.7 million), the Distressed Municipalities Program ($6.6 



38 OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 

million), the Vessel Reimbursement Program ($2.6 million), and the Manufacturers Personal 
Property Exemption ($18.5 million). The section provides grants to municipal assessors for instal- 
lation of Computer Assisted Mass Appraisal Systems ($1.3 million) for municipalities that have 
undertaken revaluation. 

The section is also responsible for certification of revaluation companies, including personnel 
doing revaluations in Connecticut and establishing recommended use values for farm and forest land. 
Additionally, the staff assists each town with tax collection and staff has participated as instructors 
in the University of Connecticut's in-service training and certification of municipal assessors and 
collectors. 

The Equalization and Tax Relief Unit prepares the net equalized grand list and sale price data files 
which includes transactions; field appraisers review the processing of 80,000 property sale reports to 
assure that the sales reflect arms-length transactions as opposed to non-market value transfers of 
property. 

The section manages, audits and certifies payments for elderly tax relief programs ($31.1 million 
for 77,900 elderly claimants) and the veteran's and disabled individual's tax relief programs ($6.1 
million for approximately 25 8,000 recipients). Staff also prepares an annual comprehensive statistical 
report for the General Assembly relating to the implementation of the programs. 



Management and Performance Evaluation Division 

Robert S. Kravchuk, Ph.D., Under Secretary 

The Management and Performance Evaluation Division is the focal point for management 
improvement in state government. The mission of the division is to fulfill the statutory obligations of 
the Office of Policy and Management to examine the operations of state government for purposes of 
"determining the effectiveness of its management, internal organization and operating procedures and 
character, amount, quality and cost of the service rendered." In pursuit of its mission, the division 
employs state-of-the-art consulting, process intervention, and organizational change methods and 
techniques. Authority to engage in such examinations, to recommend improvements, and to assist in 
implementation of such improvement proactively is conferred under Conn. Gen. Statutes, Sees. 4-66 
and 4-67. 

In fulfillment of these objectives, the Management and Performance Evaluation Division engages 
in such activities as will promote improvements in the management of state government. This includes 
undertaking special projects intended to enhance the core administrative systems which support the 
state's overall management capacity. Other divisional activities include, but are not limited to: 

• Design and implement programs to enhance the effectiveness, efficiency and quality of state 
departments' policies, programs, and services. 

• Advise and assist the governor, secretary and agency heads concerning management issues 
pertaining to any aspect of state government. 

• Provide internal management consulting services to state departments and agencies for organi- 
zational improvement. 

• In conjunction with the agencies, establish performance measures and standards for state 
departments and agencies, and related monitoring systems. 

• Provide project management skills to strengthen the agencies' core administrative systems, and 
capacity to serve the public. 

• Manage projects of a special nature, as required. 

In the 1992 fiscal year, the division aggressively pursued management improvement initiatives in 
a wide array of critical areas in state government, including: Transition to a biennial budget approach 
for all of state government; Implementation of the Automated Budget System in 32 state departments 
and agencies; Development of a methodology to improve the program performance measures 
included in the governor's program budget; Initiation and management of the Automated Personnel 
System Development Project; and Implementation of Total Quality Management (TQM) in some 18 
state departments and agencies. Further details concerning these activities follows, below. 

• Biennial Budget Development. Connecticut implemented a two-year budget process on July 1, 
1992, in preparation for the 1993-95 biennium. The new process, which differs substantially from 
other states' two-year budgets, embodies a five-year strategic policy and spending forecast, which 
permits lawmakers and the administration to assess the impact of new budget initiatives on the state 
revenue system in future years. In addition, the second year of the biennium can be revised based on 
new information in the first year. The Governor also is expected to address any budget deficiency 
which is forecasted for the biennium, on a fiscal year basis. 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 39 

• Automated Budget System. Connecticut completed development work on its new Automated 
Budget System (ABS) in November 1991. ABS is a "state-of-the-art" mainframe-based budgeting 
and financial management tool that will enhance state budgeting procedures and promote better 
financial decision making. ABS has been designed to fully support the program budget process. By 
June 30, 1992. ABS had been implemented in 32 state agencies. All agencies will be fully 
implemented and ABS operational statewide by June 30, 1993 . The value of ABS is that it integrates 
budget execution and formulation, basing new budget projections on up-to-the-minute spending data. 
Personnel, accounting and performance data are related at the cost center level, permitting a more 
thoroughgoing analysis of state expenditures. 

• Program Performance Measures. Management and Performance Evaluation Division staff have 
been working closely with the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) on development 
of GASB's "Service Efforts and Accomplishments" performance measures project. In return, 
GASB's research department has been coaching Connecticut in development of a methodology to 
enhance the state's program performance measures to make them more meaningful for management 
and budget planning purposes. 

•Automated Personnel System. The Automated Personnel System (APS) Development Project was 
initiated late in the 1992 fiscal year. This project, which will fully automate Connecticut's personnel 
planning and management processes, will link all state agencies to a central database repository of 
position and payroll data. Decision makers will have access to up-to-the-minute personnel data, and 
an interface link to the Automated Budget System will permit the integration of personnel planning 
and budget formulation cycles. The new system is expected to be operational for budget support by 
June 30, 1993, and fully functional by June 30, 1994. 

• Total Quality Management (TQM). Total Quality Management procedures hold great promise to 
improve the effectiveness of state government at lower cost, but only over the long term. The real 
benefits of TQM derive from improved coordination of activities, greater employee participation in 
improving operations, and the actual elimination of unnecessary work activities. The industrial 
experience with TQM has been that several years are required in order to reap great benefits. This 
means that the sooner Connecticut starts the sooner it will begin to improve. The Management and 
Performance Evaluation Division began a multi-year effort in the 1 992 fiscal year to implement TQM. 
At June 30, 1992, some 18 agencies had initiated TQM practices, and were at various stages of 
implementation. 

Other activities of the Management Division during the 1992 fiscal year included managing a 
reorganization study for the Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission; assuming leadership 
on an interim basis for the state's Office of Information and Technology; delivering a strategic quality 
planning seminar for the Connecticut Executive Management Program; and training all state agency 
central administrative personnel concerning implementation of the new biennial budget process, and 
the use of the Automated Budget System to develop the new budget format. 



40 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



Tax Waiver List 

In accordance with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 12-3(a), the Tax Review Committee has approved the 
following list of all penalty waivers for the 1991-92 fiscal year: 



0833343000 A & A ANSWERING 

3669447000 A & D AUTOMOTIVE INC 

5 134903000 A & F CONSTRUCTION & MGMT 

5600911000 A & S WINES & LIQUORS 

2378099000 AVTUCHYINC 

5592738000 A AMCO TRANSMISSION 

0389700000 AARONS SPORTSCARDS 

5246756000 ABB AMD ATA INC 

0592188000 ABERN ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY 

0592 1 88000 ABERN ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY 

0158980000 ABLE LOCKSMITH 

6236004000 ABOVE PAR LANDSCAPES 

04840227 1 ABR AHMS JAMS 

0446011310 ACABBO RALPH J JR 

0893669000 ACCURATE ELECTRONICS INC 

045 1 36900 1 ACE LOCK & LAWN MOWER SERVICE 

0451369001 ACE LOCK & LAWN MOWER SERVICE 

0302824360 ACETO LEONARD D 

5063094540 ACKERMAN DON E & JANET N 

4559985000 ACURA OF FAIRFIELD DON THOMAS P 

0462885790 ADAMS AMY 

0551426620 ADAMS E SHERMAN 

2764644680 ADAMS GARY F & KAREN A 

2042865440 ADAMS JOHN M & ROSEMARTE A 

0650147250 ADILETTA JOSEPH G & CLAIRE E 

4835880000 ADVANTAGE MAINTENANCE 

6 139703000 AFFORDABLE GLASS & MIRROR 

6139703000 AFFORDABLE GLASS & MIRROR 

4630893000 AFTERGLOW ENERGY CENTER INC 

5602266130 AHLTNSJACKT 

0302882080 AHN SANGWOO & ALISON D 

4351508000 ATM TELEPHONES INC 

435 1 508000 ATM TELEPHONES INC 

0472489080 AIUDI ETTERO W JR & TERESA 

0472488890 AIUDI JOSEPH & DORIS 

0412647800 AJELLO JOSEPH SR EST OF 

0412647800 AJELLO JOSEPH SR EST OF 

0483229480 ALDERMAN ELLIOT & DIANE 

041 1286530 ALDERMAN MELVILLE Y & BEATRICE 

041463 1420 ALDRICH JAMES & JEANNE 

0492442290 ALEKSANDRAVICIUS BRONIUS & MAR 

3388667000 ALERT INC 

1 193270870 ALEXANDER STUART & HEATHER 

5765151000 ALL SEASONS TREE CARE 

0774927000 ALL STATE BOILER WORK INC 

2576233 130 ALLEN ALBERT G & JO ANN G 

1 57 1 887690 ALLEN MILTON N & LIES A BINS 

0133674140 ALLEN PHILIP & PHOEBE 

3286929000 ALLIED SANITATION INC 

0722895450 ALMAN ROBERT L & SANDRA 

3406675000 ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, 

3406675000 ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, 

3406675000 ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, 

3406675000 ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, 

3406675000 ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, 



HARTFORD CT, SUT 205. 38 

WATERTOWN CT, SUT 130.82 

W HAVEN CT, CORP 1 ,720. 80 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 264. 15 

NORWALK CT, SUT 1,743.16 

E HARTFORD CT, SUT 212.14 

BETHEL CT, SUT 452.10 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 15,978.79 

WALLTNGFORD CT, SUT 357.01 

WALLTNGFORD CT, SUT 360.72 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 286.92 

MJJDDLETOWN CT, SUT 555.35 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 106.35 

GUILFORD CT, CG 139.31 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CORP 686.00 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 1 44.66 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 159.95 

S WINDSOR CT, CG 102.52 

NEW YORK NY, CG 5,948.3 1 

DARIEN CT, SUT 4,597.21 

NEWTNGTON CT, CG 11 5.98 

NEW PRESTON CT, CG 902.60 

ALPHARETTA GA, CG 311 .39 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 11 0.70 

THOMPSON CT, CG 280.35 

HAMDEN CT, SUT 468.75 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 3 17.43 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 101.45 

MERIDEN CT, SUT 380.73 

DANBURYCT.CG 160.80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,864.69 

PARSIPPANY NJ, SUT 470.04 

PARSIPPANY NJ, SUT 1 ,697.34 

KENSINGTON CT, CG 1 14.16 

KENSINGTON CT, CG 393.56 

NEW HAVEN CT, FTD 498.30 

NEW HAVEN CT, FID 446.40 

HAMDEN CT,CG 461.56 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 125.52 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 126.48 

BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 131.51 

BLOOMFIELD CT, SUT 1 ,589.25 

STAMFORD CT, CG 236.84 

W REDDING CT, SUT 434.40 

FARMINGTON CT, CORP 377.20 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 504.69 

OLD LYME CT.CG 171.09 

W SIMSBURY CT, CG 525.69 

FORESTVILLE CT, SUT 265.53 

JACKSONVILLE FL, CG 1 00. 80 

NEW LONDON CT, SUT 528. 84 

NEW LONDON CT, SUT 467.25 

NEW LONDON CT, SUT 50 1 . 40 

NEW LONDON CT, SUT 437. 16 

NEW LONDON CT, SUT 357.68 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



41 



3406675000 
3406675000 
3406675000 
3406675000 
1172011700 
0052848320 
0463006950 
0556506000 
2156229730 
5613203765 
5613310765 
5893938000 
1125103765 
6156574000 
5609441762 
5613369765 
2580025000 
5612825762 
4224184000 
5613617765 
5613617765 
5610332762 
0482264960 
2374445000 
0346809000 
5033456900 
7777113055 
0400967210 
0412238070 
0440545330 
1321807630 
0669549000 
0460538370 
2103455410 
2777589000 
0212216450 
0405455080 
0443269550 
2882463420 
2577083320 
5555800000 
5759345000 
0495721000 
0452420160 
5964325000 
0481040690 
0403073540 
1074873300 
1074873360 
1074873360 
0406880540 
1054206990 
4770160000 
0753078380 
1282893350 
0606186000 
0401215900 
0617670000 
0617670000 
2642319460 



ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, NEW LONDON CT, SUT 
ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, NEW LONDON CT, SUT 
ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, NEW LONDON CT, SUT 
ALS QUALITY AUTO & MARINE ELECT, NEW LONDON CT, SUT 
ALT PAULINE M NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 

ALVARD CLARK & HARRIET J W HARTFORD CT, CG 

ALVORD JOEL B & ANNE S GLASTONBURY CT, CG 

AM INTERNATIONAL INC CHICAGO IL, SUT 

AMBLER CHRISTOPHER & BETH NEW CANAAN CT, CG 

AMERICAN ALLIANCE INSURANCE CO CINCINNATI OH, F&NR 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS INSURANCE C BOSTON MA, F&NR 
AMERICAN EXTERMINATING CO SPRINGFIELD MA, SUT 

AMERICAN FIDELITY COMPANY MANCHESTER NH, F&NR 

AMERICAN FINANCE GROUP BOSTON MA, SUT 

AMERICAN GENERAL LIFE NY SYRACUSE NY, F&NR 

AMERICAN HARDWARE MUTUAL INS C MINNEAPOLIS MN, F&NR 
AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PASSPO MIAMI FL, SUT 
AMERICAN MODERN HOME INSURANC CINCINNATI OH, F&NR 
AMERICAN SECURITY EQUIPMENT INC WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 



AMERISURE INSURANCE COMPANY 
AMERISURE INSURANCE COMPANY 
AMEX LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY 
AMICO NICHOLAS L & EVELYN 
AMODIO MOVING INC 
AMPERE ELECTRIC CO 
ANDERSON MARJORIE J 
ANDERSON MEREDITH T OR JOSEPH E 
ANDREINI HELEN 
ANDREO LOREN J & MARGARET 
ANDREWS ELLIOT F & GERALDINE L 
ANDREWS JOHN W & WILMA A 
ANDREWS OIL COMPANY INC 
ANDRUS BUTLER W & FRANCES 
ANESTIS ROBERT W & JANICE L 
ANGELICA CORPORATION 
ANGELL WILLIAM G & ARLTNE M 
ANNULLI LON G & SUSAN 
ANSALDI THOMAS A & ARLYNE B 
ANTONINI MARION H & PENELOPE F 
APPLEGARTH PAUL V & LINDA D 
APPLIED COMPUTER SCIENCES JNC 
ARIUS SECURITY INC 
ARMY NAVY CLUB INC THE 
ARNEBERG TOR B & JEAN M 
ARNOLD ADVERTISING 
ARNOLD FORREST D & HELEN R 
ARONSON WILLIAM A & JACQUELINE 
ARREDONDO ELENA I 
ARREDONDO FABIOLA R 
ARREDONDO FABIOLA R 
ARREDONDO MARISA V 
ARROL DOUGLAS P & JANICE V 
ARROW BUILDING MAINTENANCE CO 
ARTH RONALD M & JUDITH S 
ARTHUR WARREN & MAI 
ARTISTIC WROUGHT IRON MFG CO IN 
ARUTE JOSEPH D & PATRICIA 
ARWOOD CORPORATION 
ARWOOD CORPORATION 
ASHAH ORLANDO & CORALIA 



SOUTHFIELD MI, F&NR 
SOUTHFIELD MI, F&NR 
SAN RAFAEL CA, F&NR 
ANSONIA CT, CG 
NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 
BLOOMFIELD CT, SUT 
KENT CT, CG 
BETHEL CT, JND 
ANSONIA CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
BETHEL CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
S WINDSOR CT, MF 
SLMSBURY CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
ST LOUIS MO, SUT 
MARCO FL, CG 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
BOLTON CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
NEWTOWN CT, SUT 
FRAMINGHAM MA, SUT 
MANCHESTER CT, SUT 
DARIEN CT, CG 
BOSTON MA, SUT 
NEW MILFORD CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, SUT 
FARMINGTON CT, CG 
GROTON CT, SUT 
GROTONCT,SUT 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 



301.67 
484.37 
405.58 
234.27 
179.83 
187.02 
429.05 

3,357.78 

111.48 

296.07 

17,373.47 

114.21 

6,830.68 
36,040.58 

1,003.29 

2,999.03 
108.53 

1,020.45 

1,145.20 

440.63 

440.63 

24,248.93 

239.76 

6,948.86 
731.25 
181.75 
101.25 
103.86 
801.90 
123.12 
180.86 
619.91 
267.88 
329.49 

2,402.43 
158.70 
133.70 
120.30 

1,354.46 
176.10 
103.34 
453.74 
211.68 
461.43 
197.91 
460.26 
119.20 
426.87 
913.51 
552.15 
354.15 
579.50 

1,998.86 
224.60 
149.80 
396.12 
257.88 

2,639.71 

2,639.71 
498.% 



42 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0870922940 
2861025310 
1112419730 
1742433320 
6306245000 
6306245000 
6306245000 
6306245000 
0661868000 
1085054490 
0473056380 
0423615600 
0637629000 
0600338000 
1270372710 
0482808880 
4792461000 
0688739000 
6051221000 
0422841600 
5441860000 
0646612000 
4687240000 
4687240000 
4687240000 
0472446420 
0441245800 
0423873450 
0933234080 
6245450000 
0472431510 
2120715000 
0423888430 
0033062770 
0443260920 
1302666460 
0820480000 
1212427600 
2365631070 
0404443440 
0692509000 
0454026900 
0472814210 
0612652060 
6244321000 
0413222280 
0471000870 
6048557000 
3283006460 
1444413600 
1323672140 
0441227220 
0433026820 
0414066140 
0454008620 
3207289000 
3207289000 
3779154000 
0463050880 
0473494430 



NEW YORK NY, CG 
BROOKFIELD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
FALLS CHURCH VA, SUT 
FALLS CHURCH VA, SUT 
FALLS CHURCH VA, SUT 
FALLS CHURCH VA, SUT 



ASHMAN MARCIA 

ASHMORE HARRY L & JANET M 

ASHTON HARRIS J & ANGELA M 

ASRICAN MANFRED & JOAN H 

ASSOCI ATED DENTAL REPAIR SERVIC 

ASSOCIATED DENTAL REPAIR SERVIC 

ASSOCIATED DENTAL REPAIR SERVIC 

ASSOCIATED DENTAL REPAIR SERVIC 

ASSOCIATED WATER INDUSTRIES INC STAMFORD CT, SUT 

ASTER CHARLES E & RENEE P WESTPORT CT, CG 

ASTMANN ROGER J & LINDA K N HAVEN CT, CG 

ATKINS EARL L & DONNA M DARIEN CT, CG 

ATLANTIC PIPE CORPORATION PLAINVILLE CT, SUT 

ATLAS OVERHEAD DOOR SALES CO OF SUFFIELD CT, SUT 

AUBR Y PAUL M & ELIZABETH A GREENWICH CT, CG 

AUGUST STEPHEN & JUDY NEW HAVEN CT, CG 

AUSTIN COMPUTER CONSULTING BETHANY CT, SUT 

AUTOMATIC BUSINESS PRODUCTS CO NEW SMYRNA BEACH FL, SUT 

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNIQUES INDUSTRIENEW MILFORD CT, SUT 



AVERY PETER S & JOAN B 

AVON CLOCK & LIGHTING 

B & B TOOL COMPANY 

BP GETTY MART 

BP GETTY MART 

BP GETTY MART 

BABCOCK JAMES W & FRANCES R 

BABIAN FRANK A & ADELA 

B ACHYRYCZ DONALD & JAYNE 

BACON CHARLES V m 

BAGEL BOYS BAGEL BAKERY 

BAGGISH DONALD A & ROBERTA 

B AIER CONSTRUCTION COMPANY INC 

BAILEY JOHN M & ELIZABETH D 

BAILEY SAMUEL JR & JANET G 

BAILEY WILLIAM A SR 

BAILLIE HI DAVID G & PRISCILLA 



GRANBY CT, CG 
AVON CT, SUT 
BRISTOL CT, SUT 
EAST HAVEN CT, SUT 
EAST HAVEN CT, SUT 
EAST HAVEN CT, SUT 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
OXFORD CT, CG 
NORWICH CT, CG 
GLASTONBURY CT, SUT 
BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 
BLOOMFIELD CT, CORP 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
FARMINGTON CT, CG 
WATERFORD CT, CG 
GUILFORD CT, CG 



BAIRRADA BAKERY PASTRY SHOP INC HARTFORD CT, SUT 



BAKER FRANCIS E & KAREN 

BAKER JOE & PENNY 

BAKER JOHN & PAM 

BAKERS COUNTRY FURNITURE INC 

B ALDI RICHARD P & NANCY J 

B ALDINI MARIO R & ANN 

B ALDRIGE MARGARET M 

BALK JULIA 

BALLETTI JOHN JR 

BALLETTI ROSE M 



VERO BEACH FL, CG 
LAKEVILLE CT, CG 
LITCHFIELD CT, CG 
STAFFORD SPGS CT, SUT 
COLCHESTER CT, CG 
NORTH HAVEN CT, CG 
WOODBURY CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, SUT 
NEWINGTON CT, CG 
NEWINGTONCT.CG 



BALLOONS BY MONKEY BUSINESS INC NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 



BALMORI DIANA 

BALZER DAVID R JR & MELINDA D 
BALZER ROBERT E & PAULA L 
BAMBUCH EDWIN T & HELEN M 
BANSEMER ROBERT J & KATHLEEN F 
BARBERINO TOM & LOUISE 
BARDUGONE ALICE 
BARE NECESSITIES OF NORWALK INC 
BARE NECESSITIES OF NORWALK INC 
B ARIBAULT JEWELERS 
BARILLARO FRANCES 
BARLOW JOHN H 



NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 
TOWACO NJ, CG 
SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 
E HARTFORD CT, CG 
WALLINGFORD CT, CG 
MONROE CT, CG 
NEWARK NJ, CORP 
NEWARK NJ, CORP 
GLASTONBURY CT, CORP 
MERIDEN CT, CG 
MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 



439.67 
912.00 

3,753.98 
130.10 
322.69 
285.91 

1,205.09 
152.28 

1,176.50 
136.75 
345.55 
124.70 
569.20 

2,508.78 
103.21 
405.09 
104.87 
140.91 
477.89 
174.40 
525.56 
105.55 
568.41 
485.52 
441.80 
105.36 
190.29 
195.90 
132.29 
857.67 
125.18 

9,090.00 
170.23 
488.90 
186.48 
105.34 
176.98 
285.90 
579.70 
218.18 

1,425.13 
160.90 
145.34 

2,269.66 
105.60 
710.49 
330.90 
109.91 
226.91 
122.18 
114.71 
170.31 
460.71 
130.68 
972.07 
249.70 
515.40 

1,380.80 
175.70 
344.40 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



43 



08201 16550 BARNARD EDWARD T & JEANETTE P 

5151214060 BARNEY JAMES E 

461 1 806240 B ARNSTON JACK D & ELIZABETH H 

2638413010 BARRES PAULINE 

1 50 1 257920 BARRON LAWRENCE E & EVELYN D 

0491093860 BARRON LEE J & GRACE M 

4036486 1 1 BARROWS GEORGE H & JANE P 

0474673030 BARRY JOHN F JH & DARIA B 

0864050830 BARSOLI JOHN & PATRICIA 

0476031710 BARTOES RICHARD S & LORI B 

7777116260 BARTOL FRANKLIN H 

03 1 1 804530 B ARTOLOMEI EMO & MARION 

0464214410 BARTONE DOUGLAS P & KATHLEEN P 

0331613610 BARWISE RICHARD G & DOROTHY W 

0422464980 BASILE JOSEPH N & ANGELA M 

6422422000 B ASKTN ROBBINS 

0412466760 BASKTND STANLEY M 

1474444640 BASS ARTHUR E 

0333019230 BASS DAVID M 

101241 1020 BASSOCK STEPHEN A & SHARON 

1012411020 BASSOCK STEPHEN A & SHARON 

0426028870 BATTER WAYNE S & KLMBERLY 

0422439100 BAUM LOUISE 

1311 404260 BAUM AN HERMAN & DELORES 

0453459630 B AVEDAS ANTHONY J JR & SANDRA T 

0535658000 BAXTER HEALTHCARE CORPORATION 

0983232200 BAYLIS ROBERT M & LOIS W 

0482249310 B A YNE WILLI AM & DELORES 

0401843100 BAYRAMMARYJ 

3847951000 BAYVTEW PACKAGE STORE 

3 84795 1 000 B A YVIEW PACKAGE STORE 

5486303000 BBS 

0451618780 BEACH MILDRED H 

0480360560 BEAKEY JOHN F & MARGARET H 

0472800170 BEARD DANIEL SR & BEATRICE 

0403 872260 BEARD MARGARET S 

5793422410 BEAUMONT CHARLES O & AUDREY G 

3202673990 BECK FREDERICK W & ELIZABETH L 

7777117510 BECK THOMAS P 

1262059100 BECKER MARVIN 

4245353000 BEDDING SPECIALISTS 

0490569880 BEDNARSKY RAYMOND F 

0563346000 BEECHER BENNETT INC 

1743031560 BEHRTNGER FRIEDRICH R & JOHANNA 

0441886850 BEIRPONCH EDWARD I 

0649582000 BELARDINELLI TIRE COMPANY 

6182943000 BELDAN HOME & BUILDING CENTER I 

0632638002 BELL FOOD SERVICES 

063263 800 1 BELL FOOD SERVICES INC 

0632638000 BELL FOOD SERVICES INC 

0423245200 BELL THOMAS JR & MARIA K 

3876829020 BELL WILLIAM J & AUDREY B 

5605050000 BELLA NAPOLI APTZZA 1 

5245980000 BELLE PARKE FASHIONS INC 

0403218460 BELLOBUONO MICHAEL & GERALDINE 

1173641570 BELSKY MARK & AMI E 

047763 1700 BEN AVI STEPHAN & NINA 

6307029000 BENCHMARK GROUP 

0442462140 BENHAM HENRY C & MARY A 



GUILFORD CT, CG 1 10.60 

AVONCT, CG 114.80 

NO HAVEN CT.CG 185.35 

STONTNGTON CT, CG 499.40 

STAMFORD CT, CG 132.30 

HARTFORD CT, CG 343. 80 

AVON CT, CG 284.06 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 740. 82 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,044.26 

EARLYSVTLLE VA, CG 158.92 

NEW LONDON CT, IND 137.00 

PUTNAM CT.CG 257.16 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 157. 13 

NORWALKCT.CG 129.84 

BRISTOL CT.CG 192.39 

BLOOMFIELD CT, SUT 1 15.93 

VERNON CT.CG 413.07 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 10.65 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 184.81 

STRATFORD CT, CG 1 ,859.90 

STRATFORD CT, CG 1,901.38 

NORTHFORD CT, CG 1 02. 57 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 27 1 .55 

SHERMAN CT, CG 104.56 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 401.93 

DEERFIELD ILL, MC 1 20.47 

DARIENCT.CG 3,006.01 

BRISTOL CT, CG 364.32 

SAN JOSE C A, CG 326.03 

MTLFORD CT, SUT 297.06 

MTLFORD CT, SUT 424.97 

MTDDLETOWN CT, SUT 283.06 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 1 18.40 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 530.28 

SHELTONCT.CG 2,251.61 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 3 17.92 

MYSTIC CT, CG 348.04 

SARASOTA FL, CG 248.21 

RTDGEFIELD CT, IND 101.50 

BRANFORD CT, CG 799.39 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 593.55 

STRATFORD CT, CG 430.38 

HAMDEN CT, SUT 253.23 

WATERFORD CT, CG 169.27 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 262.74 

BETHEL CT, SUT 750.00 

WOLCOTT CT, SUT 4, 1 1 8. 89 

GLASTONBURY CT, SUT 325.52 

GLASTONBURY CT, SUT 1 60.27 

GLASTONBURY CT, SUT 3,852.52 

STAMFORD CT, CG 102.40 

DARIEN CT, CG 122.79 

MTLFORD CT, SUT 503.40 

DAYVTLLE CT, SUT 105.00 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 288.93 

AVON CT, CG 260.37 

REDDING CT.CG 194.60 

WESTPORT CT, SUT 930.39 

HAMDEN CT, CG 805.30 



44 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0333299630 BENSON KENNETH B & JANET L 

2178234370 BENTHALL TIMOTHY & SUSAN A K 

1422839090 BERARDELU ROY J 

1422839090 BERARDELU ROY J 

1076488580 BERBERIAN ANTRANIG & BETTY 

0470318210 BERGAGIN GUSTAVE & ANN 

0333643 140 BERGER MARSHALL K JR & KAREN K 

3392617420 BERGER ROBERT B & JANET 

0404633880 BERGES JOHN & KATHERINE 

0464435620 BERKOWITZ DAVID 

0833212480 BERLIN BERT B & RUTH 

049321 1520 BERMAN MALCOLM & BRENDA 

1342400640 BERNARD ALLAN H & NANCY S 

1342400640 BERNARD ALLAN H & NANCY S 

0473035 130 BERNARDI JOSEPH A & BARBARA A 

2543114000 BERNARDS 

1661468530 BERNAS JOSEPH A & BEATRICE 

1 193642140 BERNSTEIN CLAUDE D F & MELODY B 

1 862057 140 BERSON SELWYN D & PH YLLIS S 

0702090610 BERTLES EILEEN B 

0943220390 BESDINE RICHARD W & TERRIE T 

0802256007 BESS EATON DONUTS 
0802256005 BESS EATON DONUTS 

0802256009 BESS EATON DONUTS 

0802256010 BESS EATON DONUTS 

0802256008 BESS EATON DONUTS 

0802256003 BESS EATON DONUTS OF TORRTNGTON 

0802256004 BESS EATON DONUTS OF TORRTNGTON 

0802256000 BESS EATON OF TORRTNGTON INC 

0802256001 BESS EATON OF TORRTNGTON INC 

0802256002 BESS EATON OF TORRINGTON INC 
152639320 BESSEY EDWARD C & JILL M 
043244 1 050 BESSONI FRANK & LUCILLE 
0462806770 BESSONI LOUIS & BARBARA 
0462806770 BESSONI LOUIS & BARBARA 
042247 1750 BESSONI RAYMOND & LENA 
6297253000 BEST LITTLE DOG HOUSE 
0422483550 BESTOR NANCY 

4951927000 BETHANY SCIENCES 

477 1 242000 BETHLEHEM VIDEO CENTER 

5193354000 BETTER CARPET CLEANERS CO INC 

5896386000 BETTS WOODWORK 

047221 1 820 BJDWELL DONALD &HELEN S 

0410952710 BIERBAUM GEORGE R & IRENE T 

0799916000 BINK INCORPORATED 

2954360000 BINKS AUTO GLASS CO INC 

491 1 895210 BINSHADLER EDWARD W & PRISILLA 

0312889900 BIRNTE ARTHUR & BARBARA B 

0482446330 BISCOE ROBERT & JOYCE 

0432801120 BDCON HENRY 

1 660353690 BLAGDEN JOSEPH & CLARISSA 

6352322000 BLAIR DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION CO 

5477487040 BLAIR JOHN H 

0892049870 BLAU BARRY & EILEEN 

0632061230 BLEYFUS RICHARDOT JEAN G & NATA 

0647479000 BLONDERS INC 

2763506000 BLUM SHAPIRO AND COMPANY PC 

5800800000 BOARDWALK FRIES 

5800800000 BOARDWALK FRIES 



LEBANON CT, CG 255.73 

STAMFORD CT, CG 266. 89 

STAMFORD CT, CG 308.70 

STAMFORD CT, CG 308.70 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 09. 88 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 200.48 

CANTON CT, CG 129.42 

NEW CANAAN CT.CG 144.58 

BRANFORD CT, CG 1 1 1.60 

STRATFORD CT, CG 1 80.40 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 167.20 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 214.70 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,738.08 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1,991.69 

KENSINGTON CT, CG 208.66 

GLASTONBURY CT, CORP 200.00 

STRATFORD CT, CG 141.20 

STAMFORD CT, CG 175.20 

AVONCT.CG 142.59 

GREENWICH CT, CG 982.50 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 170.42 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 208.40 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 370.25 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 325.24 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 430.63 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 1 55.49 

TORRTNGTON CT, SUT 353.28 

TORRTNGTON CT, SUT 410.36 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 3 1 9. 84 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 235.57 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 347.03 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 863.58 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 530.22 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 295.37 

WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 410.16 

NEWTNGTONCT.CG 321.90 

BROOKFIELD CT, SUT 307.49 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 11 1.84 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 107.33 

BETHLEHEM CT, SUT 213.13 

MTDDLETOWN CT, SUT 341.36 

WESTON CT, SUT 132.98 

MERIDENCT.CG 572.51 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 283.13 

MERJDEN CT, SUT 178.81 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 392.28 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 174.42 

MADISON CT.CG 137.42 

NEWTOWN CT.CG 156.95 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 103.70 

JAMESTOWN RI, CG 144.40 

W MIFFLIN PA, SUT 796.20 

DARIEN CT, CG 828.90 

WESTPORT CT, CG 165.56 

MIDDLEBURY VT, CG 126.90 

WATERFORD CT, SUT 220.21 

FARMINGTON CT, BU 1 80.92 

TRUMB ULL CT, SUT 250.06 

TRUMBULL CT, SUT 227.36 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



45 



BOBRUFF CAROLE M 

BOBS SURPLUS BOBS STORES 

BOGAN STEPHEN C & THERESA W 

BOGDAN JULIUS & RITA 

BOGIE ROBERT A & ABIGAIL L 

BOGIE ROBERT A & ABIGAIL L 

BOGIE ROBERT A & ABIGAIL L 

BOISONEAU GIL 

BOLAND WALTER J & GLADYS I 

BONA LOUIS J & ANTOINETTE M ST 

BONDI ANTHONY J & BARBARA B 

BONDY PHILIP K & SARAH E 

BONHAM DANIEL 

BONK HENRY F & MAE C 

BONWTLL MICHAEL H & CONCETTA 

BOOKFAIRINC 

BOOTH JOHN T & ANNE M 

BOOTH JOHN T & ANNE M 

BORBELY WILLIAM R & KATHLEEN E 

BORGER ALLEN P & AUDREY L 

BORGESON ROGER D 

BORGHESINELLAT 

BORGIDA CHARLES & JOYCE 

BORN IN AMERICA PIZZA & ETC 

BOSSOM BERNARD & JANET 

BOSTON COFFEE & TEA 

BOURKE ALLISON K 

BOUTIQUE DE JOLIE MADAME 

BOUTON RICHARD E 

BOWES ALFRED L JR & MARY 

BOWES ALFRED L JR & MARY 

BOWLINE JO ANN P 

BOYD WILLIAM A 

BOYSE ELEANORE H 

BOZZUTO ADAM J & LILLIAN B 

BOZZUTO JAYNE A 

BOZZUTO MICHAEL A 

BOZZUTO MICHAEL A 

BOZZUTO RICHARD & ANGELA 

BP OIL COMPANY 

BP OIL COMPANY 

BRADLAU ROGER A & ELIZABETH A 

BRADY FRANCIS J & MARY M 

BRAESTRUP ELSEBET 

BRAHANEY THOMAS 

BRAINARD WARREN M & MARY M 

BRAUN CARL C & MARTHA L 

BRAUN FRED R & PATRICIA M 

BRAUN ROBERT & MARICA 

BRAZA EDWARD & NOREEN 

BRAZELL CARL C JR & SUSAN Z 

BREGMAN HERBERT A & ELAINE S 

BRENNAN BRUKNER CYNTHIA 

BRENNAN JOHN J & MARY JR 

BRENNAN WILLIAM & JO ANN 

BRTNEY LESTER S & WINIFRED S 

BRINK WILLIAM J & JENNY L 

BRISTOL TRUCK TIRE SERVICE INC 

BRO ADBRU3GE JOHN N & SANDRA A 



NIANTICCT.CG 212.03 

MERIDEN CT, CORP 2,021.30 

BRANFORD CT, CG 1 49. 80 

STAMFORD CT, CG 509.09 

NEW MTLFORD CT, CG 857.90 

NEW MILFORD CT, CG 857.90 

NEW MILFORD CT, CG 772. 10 
SOUTH GLASTONBURY CT, CG 373. 14 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 252.33 

EAST HARTFORD CT, CG 538.80 

HIGGANUM CT, CG 1 17.32 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 297.50 

BRISTOL CT.CG 141.32 

AVON CT, CG 800.46 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 421.89 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 430.95 

NEW YORK NY, CG 392.74 

NEW YORK NY, CG 1 90. 80 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 193.46 

OLD LYME CT.CG 319.28 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 169.66 

TORRINGTON CT, CG 388.74 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 102. 14 

BRANFORD CT, SUT 403.42 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 13.90 

TRUMBULL CT, SUT 360.49 

DEARBORN MI, CG 142.00 

ORANGE CT, SUT 372.02 

GAYLORDSVILLE CT, SUT 1 80.00 

WESTPORT CT.CG 2,558.73 

WESTPORT CT, CG 2,3 1 5.34 

SELMAAL.CG 334.23 

ESSEX CT.CG 109.07 

FALLS VILLAGE CT, CG 1 19.90 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 1,123.07 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 440.57 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 429.82 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 429. 82 

WATERTOWN CT, CG 390.44 

CLEVELAND OH, GE 2,369.87 

CLEVELAND OH, GE 2,369.87 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, CG 136.04 

WINDSOR CT.CG 111.76 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 235. 10 

GREENWICH CT, CG 103.40 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 160.80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 785.35 

STRATFORD CT, CG 269.82 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 170.24 

CLINTON CT.CG 119.64 

W REDDING CT, CG 2,351.79 

STAMFORD CT, CG 157.91 

NEW HAVEN CT.IND 264.00 

SHELTONCT.CG 156.06 

SHELTON CT, CG 424.00 

COSCOBCT.CG 197.30 

WESTPORT CT, CG 174.90 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 400.22 

BRIDGEWATER CT, CG 169. 10 



46 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



1 190738690 
0571892760 
0910987860 
0433865460 
0069021000 
0069021000 
5601745000 
0720970120 
0481406320 
0974907000 
5261802570 
0433277870 
0491874610 
7777111857 
0443448710 
2944064660 
4836987001 
0423491380 
0433654230 
0431017390 
5725887820 
4937983000 
0492259010 
2864209170 
0462401780 
0474214740 
1603013680 
0742422300 
1302209840 
0462056770 
0979559000 
0494253270 
3390391570 
0403852010 
1404471040 
0252870160 
0480964020 
1263020000 
0452231180 
6274765000 
2193021380 
0494237300 
2724021040 
2750763360 
0402422450 
1073030630 
0403290900 
5383810100 
3220258000 
6205751001 
3844776000 
2244066470 
0492215800 
0462004770 
4213618830 
0673637690 
1502292270 
4434429000 
0661280000 



BRODY BERNARD W & SHIRLEY S 
BRODY DAVID & SHIRLEY K 
BROMBERG IRVING 
BROOKE AVERY R 
BROOKLYN OIL CO 
BROOKLYN OIL CO 
BROOKLYN PEST CONTROL 
BROWN DIANE 
BROWN EDWARD J SR 
BROWN ELEVATOR COMPANY INC 
BROWN GERALD & DORA 
BROWN JOHN R & KAREN L 
BROWN MILTON A 
BROWN ROLAND H 
BROWN RUTH W 
BROWN VICTORIA A 
BRUCE BEDRICK ENTERPRISES INC 
BRUCE DOUGLAS A & DALE K 
BRUHN ALBERT G & NANCY B 
BRUNETTE LOUIS P & ROSALIE 
BRUNNER PAUL A & ELIZABETH D 
BRUNO RATENSPERGER PHOTOGRA 
BRUNO WILLIAM V & MAJORIE 
BRYAN CHARLES A & PATRICIA J 
BRYAN F GERALD & JANET T 
BUCHMAN STUART H & LYNN W 
BUCKEY JOHN M & ARLENE S 
BUCKINGHAM HAROLD C JR & JOYCE 
BUCKLEY EUGENE & ANN 
BUCKLEY JAY S JR & MARJORIE H 



W HARTFORD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
CENTERREACH NY, CG 
PROVIDENCE RI, CG 
BROOKLYN CT, MF 
BROOKLYN CT, GE 
GLASGOCT.SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
WILLIMANTIC CT, CG 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
MYSTIC CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, IND 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
VERNON CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
ROCKY HILL CT,CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
WESTPORTCT.CG 
MADISON CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
WEST SIMSBURY CT, CG 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
GROTON CT, CG 



BUDGET AND DAN DEE CLEANERS THE HARTFORD CT, CORP 



BUDNICK BARBARA 

BUHSE HOWARD 

BULLARD ELIZABETH A E 

BULLOCK KATHARINE C 

BULLOCK RUFUS & MARY C 

BULMER CLIFFORD T & DORIS L 

BUNDER DENNIS S & SUSAN K 

BURB ANK JOHN F & PATRICIA 

BURCH SHAWN P 

BURGESS ROBERT B & ALICE T 

BURKE JOHN T SR & MARGO K 

BURNETT KAREN S 

BURTANGER CARROLL I 

BURTSCHE VICTOR W & AUDREY M 

BUSCH PAUL L & IRIS 

BUSH NECIA 

BUSHLEY CHARLES D & TRAUTE S 

BUSINESS AIRCRAFT CENTER INC 

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION MACH 

BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTS 

BUTLER THOMAS & RITA 

BYER JONAH J & CYNTHIA G 

BYER RICHARD A 

B YERS RANDOLPH K JR & ELEANOR A 

BYRNE JOHN O & KAREN K 

BYRNE THOMAS B & ALATHENA K 

C & D CHARTER POWER SYSTEMS INC 



FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
DANBURY CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
SANDY HOOK CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
WOODBURY CT, CG 
WATERBURY CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
AVON CT, CG 
LIVELY VA, CG 
SOUTHBURY CT, CG 
WESTPORTCT.CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
DANBURY CT, SUT 
NORWICH CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
AVON CT, CG 
PLYMOUTH MEETING PA, SUT 



C & M CORPORATION OF CONNECTICU WAUREGAN CT, CORP 



242.90 
238.44 
301.27 
222.12 
697.94 
350.00 
301.72 
751.81 
477.60 
481.06 
522.54 
824.20 
153.13 

1,518.75 
231.32 
241.65 
144.87 
127.20 
157.10 

1,700.73 

1,135.47 
218.50 
994.58 
692.10 
103.10 
122.70 
119.94 
518.73 
140.60 
205.34 
379.95 
161.64 

1,693.67 
184.58 
658.20 
179.39 
118.66 
576.22 
173.60 
199.77 
123.10 

1,384.60 
291.00 
775.42 
132.50 
486.00 
204.91 
882.08 
165.78 
266.46 

7,761.18 
672.10 
501.84 
148.22 
173.29 
120.54 
160.59 

1,141.12 
17.317.70 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



47 



6136865000 
5156179000 
6275895000 
0405473530 
1 106276200 
0193261960 
6191209000 
0023242220 
0412858130 
0412858130 
0593025060 
0473233090 
0420553810 
0401053830 
3380268000 
7777106160 
2201663600 
0452247890 
0362264900 
1543422940 
4277871730 
4794004000 
5970025000 
5970025000 
5970025000 
5970025000 
0623839620 
0222859250 
0491674470 
4578613000 
1232611530 
0822957000 
5741228000 
2855930000 
6064240000 
0424829040 
0423409210 
0453073120 
1042067380 
3704210000 
0102632440 
0441883360 
4761599000 
6299077000 
0460522120 
5204128000 
5204128000 
0709105007 
0972669460 
5897970000 
0624610930 
3130951640 
0441611410 
0423690410 
0631247260 
0631247260 
1083010490 
4882999000 
0765214000 



C L ADAMS COMPANY INC 
C N WOOD CO INC 
CSII 
CACASE JOHN 



WOODBURY CT, SUT 
BURLINGTON MA, SUT 
LEXINGTON MA, SUT 
WESTBROOK CT, CG 



CAGNTNELLI GIAMBATTISTA & SARAH DARIEN CT, CG 



CAIN DANIEL M 
CAJUNJOES 

CALHOUN ROBERT B & JEAN N 
CALISE CATHERINE ESTATE OF 
CALISE CATHERINE ESTATE OF 
CALLAHAN EDWARD P & MAUREEN A 
CALLAHAN GEOFFREY P GLORIA 
CALMYCA JOHN & DOROTHY 
CALOSSO JENNIE 
CALVERT SAFE & LOCK LTD 
CAMP WALTER L JR 
CAMPBELL BETTY LOU 
CAMPBELL HUGH J & VIRGINIA H 
CAMPBELL THOMAS W & SANDRA D 
CAMPORTNE JERRY V & BEATRICE 
CANADA DENNIS A & MARGARET F 
CANADIAN PACIFIC TANKERS INC 
CANAL JEWELRY 
CANAL JEWELRY 
CANAL JEWELRY 
CANAL JEWELRY 
CANDEEJOANA 
CANNING JAMES J 
CANTAFIO JOSEPH & EMILY 
CANTON GARDENS NURSERY & LAND 
CANTWELL ROBERT & BARBARA H 
CAP CORP TASTY CHICK 
CAPITAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCES 
CAPITAL RESOURCES GROUP INC 
CAPITOL NISSAN INC 
CAPOZZI ANGELO & CAMELLA 
CAPUTE JOSEPH ffl & SHEILA J 
CARALUZZI EDWARD A & PAMELA E 
CARAPEZZA JOSEPH & ANN L 
CARD STOP INC 
CARDWELL M DONALD & ROBERTA E 



W CORNWALL CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, FID 
WESTPORT CT, FID 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
EAST HARTFORD CT, CG 
MERIDEN CT, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
DERBY CT, SUT 
STRATFORD CT, IND 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
COLCHESTER CT.CG 
HIGGANUM CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT.CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CORP 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
HUNTINGTON CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
CANTON CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, SUT 
LOS ANGELES CA, SUT 
SOUTHPORT CT, BU 
ATTLEBORO MA, SUT 
WOLCOTTCT.CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
W REDDING CT, CG 
LAS VEGAS NV, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 



CAREY AUSTIN 
CAREY/ASTOR-MADISON AVE LIMOUSINEWINGTON CT, SUT 
CARLINAB INC ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 

CARLSON ERIC G & LORRAINE A NEWINGTON CT, CG 

CARLSON INDUSTRIAL SUPPORT SYST MJXFORD CT, SUT 
CARLSON INDUSTRIAL SUPPORT SYST MJXFORD CT, SUT 



CARLTON CARDS 

CARMINE SHEILA K 

CAROLS MARKET 

CARPENDERANNEJ 

CARPENTER WJXLAIM P & DOROTHEA 

CARRARO NEIL & TERESA 

CARROLL THOMAS 

CARTER EMILY C 

CARTER EMILY C 

CARTER RICHARD 

CARTER INC 

CARTS COMPANY INC 



BERLIN CT, SUT 
MAHOPAC NY, CG 
LEDYARD CT, SUT 
W REDDING CT, CG 
BRISTOL CT.CG 
NORWALK CT, CG 
BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
NEW HARTFORD CT, CG 
SHELTON CT, CORP 
CHESHIRE CT, SUT 



647.93 
289.70 
543.30 
475.42 
139.70 
600.00 
596.14 
875.51 
144.50 
173.10 
212.94 
129.13 
451.10 
411.12 
365.67 
118.13 
475.10 
184.88 
107.20 
142.20 
325.71 
873.70 
653.10 
413.25 
337.95 
283.56 
105.70 

1,171.20 
119.30 
280.87 

1,598.75 
260.55 

9,106.02 
128.60 

3,264.77 
212.20 
259.14 
109.10 
261.18 
272.36 
135.20 
113.30 
990.11 
315.70 

1,035.70 
308.93 
308.93 
242.50 
729.20 
475.43 

2,076.10 
152.19 
289.35 
217.50 
860.64 
583.65 
466.30 

4,117.10 
555.01 



48 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



1212438330 CARVER PAUL T & PHYLLIS A 

2979763000 CASA VERDE GARDENS INC 

0421683380 CASALE EUGENE & ELSIE 

0453023630 CASE RICHARD & JANET 

0627380000 CASEY FUEL INC 

0563853890 CASSELL STEVEN & CONCEPCION 

041 2839740 CATAPANO ANDREW & VIRGINIA 

043 1 824870 CA VOTO DOMINICK & JU ANITA 

1 064252000 CBI A SERVICE CORPORATION 

0403011900 CECIO PAUL A & PATRICIA 

6177778000 CENTER MOTORS 

5609821762 CENTRAL NATL LIFE INS OF OMAHA 

062621 8000 CENTRAL TOOL MACHINE CO 

6430599000 CERBECINC 

0423249910 CERRETANI NICOLA & ANN 

0254275790 CHAMBERS ROBERT J & SHERYL A 

0423230280 CHAPMAN MARO H JR & BARBARA A 

5993183000 CHARADE FASHIONS 

0557089830 CHARLESWORTH ROGER V & MARIA 

0452866400 CHARLESWORTH THOMAS J & EVELY 

0222245 190 CH ARNAS DANIEL & MAUREEN 

0443 870950 CH ASSER GENE & BETH ANE Y B 

293 1 228000 CH ASSES AUTO BODY INC 

2954043690 CHATFIELD CHARLTON H 

5778657350 CHATTERJEE MIT A 

6153571000 CHEERS DELI 

6153571000 CHEERS DELI 

3208303000 CHEFS PLACE INC 

2754284100 CHESLEY WINIFRED 

5862123000 CHESS KING 9679 

439651 1000 CHESTER BOTTLE SHOP 

439651 1000 CHESTER BOTTLE SHOP 

4396511000 CHESTER BOTTLE SHOP 

048 1009 170 CHESTER STANLEY J & ROSALIE R 

0462044270 CHETRICK ALLEN M & JOAN 

0573255550 CHILDS DANIEL R 

5740204000 CHIMINEY CRICKET 

4976148000 CHINA SUN INC 

1 022209440 CHIRONNA JOHN F & DOLORES M 

0442854910 CHODOROV STEPHAN 

0565428060 CHOUDHURY DILIP R & SIPRA 

4308292000 CHRIS PLAZA RESTAURANT 

0453430220 CHRISTMAS LEO L & JOAN A 

041 1275430 CHRISTONI JOSEPH & JANINA 

1583251990 CHRISTOPHER BARBARA J 

2085322000 CHRISTOPHERS 

0013825080 CHU RICHARD S & TINA H 

0013825080 CHU RICHARD S & TINA H 

1 563259720 CHURCH JOHN & KATHLEEN 

0151423180 CHURCHILL DELOS B & ELEANOR E 

0403078760 CIAFFONE JOSEPH R & LILLIAN F 

0435094660 CIANCHETTI ARMANDO & SANTINA G 

0453086 1 20 CIANCIOLA JAMES JR 

0404099 1 80 CICCHETTI CARL R & CAROLYN 

041 1 889090 CIMINO ALEXANDER & ALICE 

041 1 889090 CIMINO ALEXANDER & ALICE 

6459655000 CINEMACAR LEASING INC 

0481412360 CISCO JOSEPHINE B 

0481412360 CISCO JOSEPHINE B 



W HARTFORD CT, CG 400.3 1 

SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 538.80 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 1 36.22 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 144.38 

RIDGEFIELD CT, GE 1,100.00 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 1 12.46 

WEST HAVEN CT, CG 121 .78 

NORW ALK CT, CG 1 89.22 

HARTFORD CT, CORP 9,512.98 

GREENWICH CT, CG 500. 13 

MANCHESTER CT, SUT 420.34 

PEAPACK NJ, F&NR 1 , 1 56.93 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CORP 200.00 

E GRANBY CT, SUT 260.28 

NEW CANAAN CT.CG 126.65 

GROTON CT, CG 233.06 

WEST SIMSBUR Y CT, CG 114. 88 

YONKERS NY, SUT 618.81 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 586.29 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 309.73 

E NORW ALK CT, CG 1 55.35 

BURLINGTON CT, CG 294.50 

WOLCOTT CT, SUT 1 80. 80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 953.21 

WESTPORT CT, CG 120.00 

W HAVEN CT, SUT 289.89 

W HAVEN CT, SUT 268.81 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 147. 19 

WILTON CT, CG 401.86 

WORCESTER MA, SUT 1,005.10 

CHESTER CT, SUT 209.21 

CHESTER CT, SUT 223.56 

CHESTER CT, SUT 105.18 

BROAD BROOK CT, CG 324. 1 8 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 203.95 

NEW YORK NY, CG 348.90 

COVENTRY CT, SUT 1 97. 87 

E HARTFORD CT, SUT 378.94 

STAMFORD CT, CG 23 1 .01 

NORWALKCT.CG 155.60 

SEYMOUR CT.CG 112.27 

WATERTOWN CT, SUT 1 22.68 

MARLBOROUGH CT, CG 283. 10 

WALLINGFORD CT, CG 439.59 

AVON CT, CG 108.80 

GROTON CT, SUT 439.68 

DOVER MA, CG 707.80 

DOVER MA, CG 707.80 

AVONCT.CG 148.95 

OLD LYME CT, CG 226.93 

BRANFORD CT, CG 166.94 

PLANTS VILLE CT, CG 47 1 .30 

STAMFORD CT, CG 470.43 

WATERBURY CT, CG 586.93 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 375.91 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 375.91 

CLOSTER NJ, SUT 271.73 

TORRINGTON CT, CG 446. 84 

TORRINGTON CT, CG 446.84 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



49 



6479869000 CITATION MOBILE HOME SALES INC 

5627658000 CITY HARDWARE INC 

5613948765 CITY INSURANCE COMPANY 

5240130000 CITY SCAPES INC 

0492253140 CTZEK JOHN S & LUCIE 

0413461940 CLARK GRACE A 

0763 889080 CLARK HENRY A & PAMELA P m 

0843042490 CLARK JAMES F & DEBORAH R JR 

0492624 1 80 CLARK JOHN T & ELIZABETH A 

0243057030 CLARK RICHARD & PATRICIA 

1311242580 CLARKE MABEL E 

7777117153 CLARKE MARJORIE M & WILLIAM 

0474071840 CLARKE WILLIAM C & JOANNE EI 

0412475370 CLEMENTEL ROLAND C 

0592848230 CLIFFORD PATRICIA A 

0703622280 CLIFFORD PETER W 

421 1272000 CLIFTON S HARRISON & SHERATON S 

4062964000 CLOSE TO HOME 

043443 1 830 COADY KEVIN J & ROXANNE 

2985265000 COASTAL COMPUTER CONSULTANTS 

5672456000 COFFIN DAVID 

7777109429 COFRANCESCO LOUIS 

7777109429 COFRANCESCO LOUIS 

7777109429 COFRANCESCO LOUIS 

7777109429 COFRANCESCO LOUIS 

7777 109429 COFRANCESCO LOUIS 

4415063000 COGNOS CORPORATION 

4415063000 COGNOS CORPORATION 

0431447600 COHEN AARON & RHOD A 

0853677410 COHEN GERALD L 

0480138720 COHEN JEANETTE 

0643201790 COHEN WILLIAM A 

5922208000 COLCHESTER QUARRY INC 

5922208000 COLCHESTER QUARRY INC 

5922208000 COLCHESTER QUARRY INC 

061 2695980 COLE CHARLES & CYNTHIA 

0424668560 COLEMAN MARION 

0462899140 COLETTA MARTIN M 

0953427780 COLLADO MIGUEL 

2722080000 COLLECTIBLES LTD 

0412267310 COLLI GEORGE A JR 

0263215390 COLLINS WILLI AM A 

3 8628 1 4800 COLLISON CHARLES D & DOROTHY M 

7777115402 COLOMBIE RICHARD L 

4270179000 COLONIAL FORD & HONDA 

4270179000 COLONIAL FORD & HONDA 

4270179000 COLONIAL FORD & HONDA 

3549920000 COLONY PIZZA 

5064001000 COLOR SYSTEMS INC 

67688 1 6000 COMDISCO INVESTMENT GROUP INC 

5674098000 COMFORT CONTROL SYSTEMS INC 

5674098000 COMFORT CONTROL SYSTEMS INC 

0720433000 COMMERCIAL SCALE CO INC 

561 4029765 COMMERCIAL UNION INSURANCE CO 

5609987762 COMMERCIAL UNION LIFE OF AMER 

1084425000 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE CORP 

5954607000 COMPANIONS & HOMEMAKERS INC 

4566048000 COMPUTER PEOPLE INC 

6010268000 COMTECH 



LUNENBURG MA, SUT 367.22 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 332.70 

NEW YORK NY, F&NR 15,631.17 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 322.98 

DARIENCT.CG 160.81 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 122.80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 25 1 .61 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 8 1 .64 

SOMERSCT.CG 112.04 

KALAMAZOO MI, CG 845.57 

CANAAN CT.CG 187.42 

MELBOURNE FL, IND 107.00 

H ARWINTON CT, CG 1 8 1 .40 

MERIDENCT.CG 596.60 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 13.00 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 204.07 

STAMFORD CT, RO 2,967.75 

GLASTONBURY CT, SUT 523.35 

BRANFORD CT, CG 103.80 

MANCHESTER MA, SUT 584.63 

RIDGEFIELD CT, SUT 419.07 

BETHANY CT, IND 126.95 

BETHANY CT, IND 1 80.00 

BETHANY CT, IND 1 80.00 

BETHANY CT, IND 126.95 

BETHANY CT, IND 1 80.00 

BURLINGTON MA, SUT 342.93 

BURLINGTON MA, SUT 272.94 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 395.64 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 620.74 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 314. 17 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 08.90 

COLCHESTER CT, SUT 156.39 

COLCHESTER CT, SUT 136.39 

COLCHESTER CT, SUT 200.70 

POMFRETCT.CG 191.74 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 1 43.45 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 230.57 

STAMFORD CT, CG 178.62 

DANBURYCT.SUT 228.05 

ELLINGTON CT, CG 1 ,298.50 

E BERLIN CT.CG 172.31 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 139.36 

NEW HARTFORD CT, IND 116.33 

DANBURYCT.SUT 18,083.11 

DANBURYCT.SUT 16,454.43 

DANBURYCT.SUT 15,697.21 

WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 226.91 

NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 583.58 

ROSEMONT IL, CORP 383.30 

MONROE CT, SUT 165.05 

MONROE CT, SUT 175.85 

AGAWAMMA.SUT 3,117.00 

BOSTON MA, F&NR 35,994.73 

BOSTON MA, F&NR 421.42 

WASHINGTON DC, BU 1 ,292.58 

AVON CT, SUT 103.28 

LOS ANGELES CA, SUT 1,153.43 

NAUGATUCK CT, SUT 321.27 



50 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



5450697000 
0772299460 
0414053210 
0574970000 
2971083000 
6226633000 
6226633000 
6226633000 
6457261001 
6457279000 
6457261000 
4946703000 
0611475000 
0676361000 
0462852780 
0425225180 
0443657230 
0420758610 
3322021000 
0021875110 
0892255130 
4901195000 
5791496000 
0493036720 
0483648120 
0074204470 
1183441000 
5496641000 
0601073280 
1577627460 
6322572000 
7787709997 
0352637410 
1574207480 
0453872930 
0741202770 
6248413000 
5572953000 
0723022400 
0422463870 
0092842090 
0471612510 
7777114630 
5712591000 
0168997000 
3521234000 
5850268000 
0943609310 
6463582000 
0402867440 
6315469000 
6328496000 
6328496000 
3020168810 
0024462940 
0024462940 
0470149440 
0901861310 
0612630960 



CONCEPT ENGINEERING 
CONKLIN LEROY & MARGARET 
CONLON FRANCIS X & SUSAN L 
CONN EQUIPMENT SALES COMPANY 
CONNECTICUT AGGREGATES INC 
CONNECTICUT LAW BOOK COMPANY 
CONNECTICUT LAW BOOK COMPANY 
CONNECTICUT LAW BOOK COMPANY 
CONNECTICUT MACK BRIDGEPORT 
CONNECTICUT MACK BRIDGEPORT 
CONNECTICUT MACK WATERBURY 
CONNECTICUT METAL DOOR INC 
CONNECTICUT SAND STONE CORP 
CONNECTICUT STONE SUPPLIES INCO 
CONNELLY HAROLD R JR & PATRICIA 
CONSOLE JOHN J & DEBRA O 
CONSTANCE JOHN 
CONSTANTINE ARTHUR T & ZOE 
CONSULTANCY THE 
CONTAS GREGORY J & GEORGIA 
CONTI THOMAS & CAROLYN 



MILFORD CT, CORP 
LITCHFIELD CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, SUT 
TORRTNGTON CT, SUT 
GUILFORD CT, SUT 
GUILFORD CT, SUT 
GUILFORD CT, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
NO 6457261001, SUT 
WARWICK RI, SUT 
WEST HAVEN CT, SUT 
PLATNVILLE CT, SUT 
ORANGE CT, SUT 
HUNTINGTON CT, CG 
WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 
WOLCOTTCT.CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
VERNON CT, CG 



CONTINENTAL SECURITY SYSTEMS IN FARMINGTON CT, SUT 



CONVENTURE CORPORATION 

CONWAY MARC B & LAURA L 

CONWAY MARY G 

CONZE FREDERICK B & CAROL M 

COOK BUILDERS SUPPLY CO 

COOPER BROWN ASSOC PC PERSONN 

COOPER JOHN N & JOCELYN W 

COOPER ROGER J & SANDI E 

COPIER CONNECTION INC 

COPP BELTON ALLYN V 

COPPOLELLI DAVID E & LUCILLE 

CORNELL JAMES H & MARTHA E 

CORONA ANTHONY & SUSAN 

CORROON ROBERT F & HELEN M 

COS COB CHRIROPRACTIC CENTER 

COS COB GULF INC 

COSENTINO ROBERT T & CAROL A 

COSENZA BETTY J 

COTA KENNETH G & LINDA L 

COTE GEORGE W & MALVINA M 

COUGHLIN KAREN B 

COULTER & DELANEY 

COUNTRY POOL CHRISTMAS BARN 

COUNTRY STORE THE 



WESTPORT CT, CORP 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
WEST SPRINGFIELD MA, SUT 
FARMINGTON CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
BOLTON CT, SUT 
PROVIDENCE RI.IND 
HEBRON CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
DANBURYCT,CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
COS COB CT, BU 
COS COB CT, SUT 
FARMINGTON CT, CG 
ESSEX CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
SEYMOUR CT, CG 
ENFIELD CT, IND 
NORWICH CT, SUT 
WEATOGUE CT, SUT 
MYSTIC CT, SUT 



COUNTRYSIDE CHICKEN RESTAURANT NORTH STONTNGTON CT, SUT 



COURTNEY STEPHEN J & HELGA 
COURTYARD RESTAURANT INC 
COURY ELIE S & DORIS M 
COUSIN STEVES CARPET INC 
COVER IT INC 
COVER IT INC 

COX HARMER L & ISABELLE S 
COX WILLIAM J IE & DOROTHY 
COX WILLIAM J IK & DOROTHY 
COZY MICHAEL J & RHODA C 
CRAIGHEAD LINCOLN & MARYLOU 
CRANE MARGARET MCCARGO 



RIDGEFTELD CT, CG 
OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
ANSONIA CT, SUT 
ANSONIA CT, SUT 
OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 
GUILFORD CT, CG 
GUILFORD CT, CG 
WATERTOWN CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 



167.30 
203.30 
205.56 
124.76 
174.80 
189.96 
237.93 
266.71 

2,048.26 

2,048.26 

1,853.29 
552.26 

1,809.88 

4,528.63 
240.48 
204.84 
192.60 
166.70 
450.75 
174.69 
101.00 
306.01 

1,078.20 
242.71 
198.44 
414.99 
127.35 
223.99 

1,832.35 
228.84 
424.31 
104.38 
106.14 
128.20 
413.22 
364.50 
200.00 
815.24 
299.12 
222.93 

1,182.16 
350.60 
150.29 
536.85 
118.46 
239.16 
595.92 
257.98 
217.41 
762.66 

1,300.68 
128.19 
196.44 
195.88 
110.97 
131.60 
700.16 
262.62 

4,032.64 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



51 



061 2630960 CRANE MARGARET MCCARGO 

0241073000 CRANE MARION R 

1250530320 CRAWFORD PETER D & AINSLEY P 

025241 3750 CRAWLEY PAUL W & HELEN F 

443 1 599000 CREATIVE KITCHEN & BATH INC 

443 1 599000 CREATIVE KITCHEN & BATH INC 

443 1 599000 CREATIVE KITCHEN & BATH INC 

5107560000 CROMWELL SERVICE CENTER INC 

2375805020 CROSBY WILLIAM Jffl& ALICE Z 

2144001700 CROSS JOHN H JR & JEAN C 

0412488720 CROTEAU THOMAS H 

1 522636860 CROWDER A NORMAN & ELIZA M 

1 101438290 CROWDER JAMES D & LELANA J 

4677290000 CROWLEY VOLKSWAGEN INC 

4489977000 CROWN STEEL CONSTRUCTION INC 

0651021870 CROZIER MILDRED L 

6015556000 CRYSTAL LUNCHEONETTE 

0494462680 CUCINELLI ANTHONY & JANE 

1292613060 CUDDIHYJOANB 

2923381000 CUNNINGHAM GROUP INC THE 

0443030290 CUNNINGHAM JAMES D & CAROLE L 

0475889200 CUNNINGHAM KEVIN J & CHERYL A 

0492870070 CUOMO ANTHONY & MARY A 

0432860690 CURLEY ROBERT L & DOLORES G 

0441601390 CURRANJOHNF 

0472238200 CURTIN CHARLES W & CATHERINE 

6046122000 CUSTOM LAWN SERVICE 

6224968000 CUTLER COMPUTER CORPORATION 

0403834540 CUTLER KATHLEEN G 

2937043000 CYPRESS GRILL INC 

6710073000 CYPRUS MINERAL PARK CORP 

0471215070 CZAIKOWSKI EDWARD J & JOAN H 

0083063000 D & D CANTEEN 

5787544000 D & D ENTERPRISE 

4575122000 D&DSERVICE 

6017255000 D&DSER VICES 

4301 834000 D H HOUSEMAN ELECTRIC 

5142724730 DACCOINC 

0462668650 DAHLGREN DONALD J & ARLENE A 

3941008010 DAHLKE GERALD O & DAPHNE H 

0405208770 DAILEY MICHAEL E 

6366645000 DAILY CAFFE 

6035802000 DAIRY MART C39 

6035802000 DAIRY MART C39 

0403848060 DALENZ MAGDALENE EST OF 

0440534470 DALESSIO RUSSELL & LUCY 

1111 863350 DALL JES J & CLARE J 

089 1 694850 D ALLESS ANDRO ALBERT 

1202670970 DALLOW PHILIP H & MARY M 

4843447000 DALTILE CORPORATION 

0483044100 DAMICO MICHAEL J 

5507660000 DANA DEPERCIO ELECTRIC INC 

1181875750 DANA NINA M 

0527515001 DANBURY CITY OF 

5430327000 DANBURY HOTEL ASSOCIATES LTMITE 

0845677000 DANBURY INDUSTRIAL CORP 

5042015000 DANBURY SQUARE CONVERTIBLES 

5002031440 DANIELS THOMAS D & TWILA A 

0572487000 DANIELSON OIL CO INC 



NEW YORK NY, CG 7,624.34 

RAMSEY NJ, CG 695.57 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 83.78 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 209.98 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 324.3 1 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 324.3 1 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 1 06.06 

CROMWELL CT, SUT 1 49.78 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 262.37 

WESTON CT.CG 165.02 

HARTFORD CT, CG 109.24 

DARIENCT.CG 519.60 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 1 52.69 

PLAINVILLE CT, SUT 3,480.38 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CORP 677.90 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 381.20 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 102.86 

NORTH HAVEN CT, CG 1 12.26 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 82.60 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 870.76 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 391.09 

W SIMSBURY CT, CG 303.38 

HAMDENCT.CG 1,694.41 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 167.61 

WEST HAVEN CT, CG 176.30 

NEW LONDON CT, CG 238.09 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 639.84 

WORCESTER MA, SUT 894.54 

WEST HAVEN CT, CG 577.59 

MIDDLETOWN CT, SUT 426.3 1 

ENGLEWOOD CO, CORP 370.60 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 1 89.74 

NEWTOWN CT, SUT 505.35 

MANCHESTER CT, GE 300.00 

HAMDEN CT, SUT 210.06 

BRANFORD CT, SUT 205.49 

E LYME CT, SUT 1,690.97 

E HARTFORD CT, UN INS 1 19.69 

STAMFORD CT, CG 229.49 

LYMECT.CG 116.00 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 306.49 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 176.29 

ROCK VILLE CT, SUT 1 43.59 

ROCKVILLE CT, SUT 130.32 

OLD GREENWICH CT, FID 632.77 

DANBURY CT,CG 985.81 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 547.47 

ENFIELD CT.CG 145.20 

WRIGHTSVILLE BCH NC, CG 100.21 

MT VERNON NY, SUT 2,264.99 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 13.76 

ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 273.27 

WASHINGTON CT, CG 369.82 

DANBURY CT, SUT 632.95 

DANBURYCT.RO 5,326.48 

DANBURY CT, CORP 684.60 

WOODBURY NY, SUT 523.96 

AVONCT.CG 354.87 

DANIELSON CT, GE 801.88 



52 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



1212400010 DARLINGTON NOREEN T 

0454095980 DARST DANIEL R & {CATHERINE C 

5962352000 DASHS PLACE 

5962352000 DASHS PLACE 

1474065200 DATRI DAVID & CONSTANCE 

288 1 089380 D AUM JOHN H & RUTH G 

0603902000 DA VELUYS RESTAURANT INC 

0791087430 DAVENPORT LEE L & ANNE S 

1312225990 DAVIDSON SIDNEY W & GRACE M 

1 486256050 DAVIDSON TIMOTHY & NANCY R 

3411854010 DAVIS CORDELIA F EST OF 

067 1 697630 DAVIS J S ANFORD & HELEN 

344267 1 590 DAVIS JOEL & CAROL 

1372035790 DAVIS PHYLLIS B 

7210193240 DAVIS RAYMOND A & RUTH M 

5805270000 DAVIS TESTING COMPANY 

5805270000 DAVIS TESTING COMPANY 

0402493300 DAVIS WILLIAM R & DORIS M 

0693496580 DAWES TOM & REDINGTON VIRGINA 

0212844170 DAWSON JAMES A & ELIZABETH M 

0475460440 DA YETT BRIAN K 

0424611670 DAYTON ALAN P & DANA L 

0492686860 DAYTON LYNFORD J & GAIL 

6164685000 DCB ASSOCIATES 

6164685000 DCB ASSOCIATES 

0461634020 DEBARTHOLOMEW CARL J & JUDITH F 

0432682770 DEBISHOP ROBERT & MAUREEN 

4836299370 DEBOER GRETCHEN 

6386668000 DECK THE WALLS 

6386668000 DECK THE WALLS 

6386668000 DECK THE WALLS 

0423440770 DECOSTA JAMES E & ANN 

3773096770 DECOSTER MAURICE H & GEORGIANN 

0402058910 DECUSATI FELICIA 

5622013870 DEDAPPER JAY W & MARGUERITE 

53 1 0693000 DEEP RIVER RENT ALL DIV 

0434078520 DEERtfTCMARYE 

9990102040 DEHUPPO ELIZABETH T EST OF 

0233353000 DEHA AS LIEUWE T G 

0812244530 DEKADT PIETER P 

3155165000 DELANEYS AGAIN COFFEESHOP 

0793229550 DELCRUZ VIRGIL & MARGARET 

0414008040 DELFTNO THOMAS M 

0423686270 DELFTNO WILLIAM & DALE S 

0472040300 DELGAUDIO JOHN A & MARY T 

1262620760 DELIA RONALD J 

5766746000 DELL DIRECT SALES CORP 

5202510000 DELL MARKETING CORPORATION 

1 093022470 DELMHORST ARTHUR M & WYNNE P 

0451800770 DELUCA BETTE E 

0482220 170 DELUCCO FRANCIS M & ANN 

7777116004 DELUCIA LUCILLE 

4493342000 DELUXE PACKAGE STORE 

0392288840 DEMAIO JOHN T & SARAH A 

0903253700 DEMARCO ALFRED 

1 434643530 DEM ARIA ANTHONY & KATHLEEN 

0442498630 DEMARTIN ROBERT E & ROBIN 

4508396001 DEMATTEOS FUEL 

4508396001 DEMATTEOS FUEL 



RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
OAKVILLE CT, SUT 
OAKVILLE CT, SUT 
GUILFORD CT, CG 
ROSELLE IL, CG 
WATERTOWN CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
LYME CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, FID 
MADISON CT, CG 
WESTPORTCT.CG 
LITCHFIELD CT.CG 
PRESTON CT, CG 
WATERBURY CT, SUT 
WATERBURY CT, SUT 
BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT.CG 
DEEP RIVER CT, CG 
WOODBURY CT, CG 
MORRIS CT, CG 
BERLIN CT, SUT 
BERIJN CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 
EAGANMN.CG 
NO 6387831000, SUT 
NO 6387831000, SUT 
NO 6387831000, SUT 
PROSPECT CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
DEEP RIVER CT, SUT 
ENORWALKCT.CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, FTD 
WESTON CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, CG 
MIDDLEBURY CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
BRISTOL CT.CG 
BRISTOL CT.CG 
BOLTON CT,CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
AUSTEVTX.SUT 
WILMINGON DE, SUT 
RIVERSIDE CT.CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, IND 
WINSTEDCT.SUT 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
FISHER ISLAND FL, CG 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NORTH HAVEN CT.MF 
NORTH HAVEN CT, MF 



150.88 
201.00 
122.47 
135.10 
315.38 
538.06 
573.68 
198.48 
239.60 

1,235.59 
217.49 

1,156.53 
148.66 
274.74 
156.01 
532.83 

1,107.61 
421.47 
327.50 
180.36 
168.76 
173.28 
118.78 
337.47 
113.45 
115.45 
100.82 
418.00 
418.05 
382.02 
354.84 
233.83 
259.15 
678.39 
423.70 
211.13 
195.76 
454.06 
221.60 
227.43 
524.82 

1,098.60 
106.61 
649.92 
109.70 
297.39 
511.19 
228.80 
414.70 
104.00 
243.44 
242.00 
133.38 
106.62 
844.60 
105.00 
588.05 
225.97 
217.37 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



53 



0452629590 DEMCZUKJOHNE 

0423688470 DEMPSEY ROBERT D & PRISCILLA B 

046205 1 560 DEMUSIS ANTHONY M & LUCILLE A 

0483688580 DENEGRE AUDREY H 

041 1210190 DENHAM JOHN & ELEANOR 

1512439380 DENHOLTZ RICHARD A & JEAN 

1171601980 DENTON CLEVELAND R & JEAN C 

0460313560 DEPASQU ALE MARY R 

1 353242090 DER ATO FRANK & PATRICIA 

7777 1 14227 DERTNG EDWARD L & JACKLYN K 

0482455760 DEROBERTIS FRANCIS & BARBARA 

2773067960 DEROSE JAMES F 

1323208980 DESANCTIS JAMES 

0404484960 DESCHAMPLAIN DAVID J & LAURIE A 

1 43401 3700 DESIMONE GLENN J & VIRGINIA G 

1323202010 DEUTSCHER MURRAY P & BARBARA 

048 1 4699 1 DE V AUL ROBERT A & JOAN S 

0557561000 DEVINO FUELS INC 

0330597000 DEXTER CO 

7777110799 DHAWANANAND 

6297626000 DIAMONDS PLUS 

0450994040 DICKEY STANLEY & ANNE 

5238407000 DICORE INTERNATIONAL INC 

1264260280 DIDDEL G SCOTT & MICHAUD SUZANN 

2902673710 DIDRIKSEN PHILIP H JR & HELEN E 

77771 17802 DIGIOVANNI ROBERT 

0433030780 DIKEGOROS NICHOS C & ZOI 

0791857150 DILEMME PETER & MARY ANN 

0443814320 DILEO VIRGINIA 

0633017820 DILL CARL & JOSEPHINE 

1 42 1 42621 DILLON JOHN F & JEAN 

5574250470 DILLON THOMAS A & NANCY R 

0443843710 DIMARTINO BIAGIO & JOSEPHINE 

0471651610 DIMENNA JOSEPH & FRANCES 

5412283000 DINGHY PLACE 

0412024090 DIQUISEPPE LOUIS & MARJJE 

0572009840 DISALVO JOSEPH J & MARILYN W 

4605051000 DISCOUNT DRAFTING SUPPLIES INC 

3803319000 DISCOUNT VIDEO CASSETTES 1 

6287536000 DISTILLERS PRODUCTS SALES CORPO 

6287536000 DISTILLERS PRODUCTS SALES CORPO 

4289708000 DIVERSIFIED FLOORS INC 

5234661000 DIVERSIFIED WASTE DISPOSAL INC 

0654023550 DDCON STEVEN L & NANCY H 

5733675510 DOBYNS FRANK D & PHYLLIS E 

5225870950 DODDS JAMES I & RUTH 

0450178540 DODDS ROBERT B & ISABELLA E 

07293 1 9000 DODGINGTOWN GARAGE INC 

0443624000 DOERRER STEPHEN & USA 

1014239170 DOHMANN EUGENE J & PHYLLIS C 

0173005620 DOLAN PAUL V & MARLENE F 

0812677940 DOMINGUEZ GEORGE 

3484599000 DOMINICK FUEL INC 

6245559000 DOMINOS PIZZA 

6245559000 DOMINOS PIZZA 

6245559000 DOMINOS PIZZA 

6245559000 DOMINOS PIZZA 

0423419390 DOMIZIO STEPHEN & BARBARA 

6268627000 DOMS PLACE 



W HARTFORD CT, CG 123.86 

SHELTON CT, CG 258.40 

BRANFORD CT, CG 177.67 

NEW YORK NY, CG 1,288.81 

STAMFORD CT, CG 422.99 

WESTPORT CT, CG 366. 16 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 170.67 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 842.60 

NORWALK CT, CG 109.86 

NAPLES FL, IND 666.00 

WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 147.30 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 3 1 .62 

SCOTTSDALE AZ, CG 321.21 

STAFFORD SPRINGS CT, CG 1 39.20 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 461.90 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 129.71 

COSCOBCT.CG 231.60 

WATERBURY CT, GAS 3,315.75 

MYSTIC CT.SUT 133.21 

JOHNSON VT, IND 146.81 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 104. 15 

NORTH HAVEN CT, CG 121.98 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 584.99 

GREENWICH CT, CG 243.34 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 324.57 

NEWTOWN CT, IND 145. 13 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 06.44 

FORT MYERS FL, CG 533.00 

WATERBURY CT, CG 110. 12 

NEW MILFORD CT, CG 437.7 1 

SARASOTA FL, CG 177. 1 1 

WESTON CT, CG 205.79 

ANSONIACT.CG 184.63 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 202.04 

WESTBROOK CT, SUT 362.03 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 354.95 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 1 3.64 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CORP 170.40 

WALTHAM MA, SUT 538.20 

NEW YORK NY, SUT 1 19.23 

NEW YORK NY, SUT 2,079. 14 

EAST HARTFORD CT, SUT 530.76 

DANBURY CT, SUT 4,330.89 

GREENWICH CT, CG 320.94 

WESTPORT CT, CG 201.05 

DAYVILLE CT, CG 1 84.37 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 947.93 

NEWTOWN CT, SUT 268. 10 

WESTBROOK CT, CG 191.71 

STAMFORD CT, CG 100.28 

OLD LYME CT, CG 2 1 0.75 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 166.36 

NORWALK CT, MF 433.36 

ENFIELD CT, SUT 334.70 

ENFIELD CT, SUT 281.08 

ENFIELD CT, SUT 365.04 

ENFIELD CT, SUT 338.14 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 216.32 

NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 283.36 



54 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0462039950 DONAHUE GRACE E 

1732635270 DONNELLY ROBERT & SUZANNE 

5820584000 DONS FLOWERS 

6297451001 DONUT WORLD INC 

6489579000 DOOLITTLE THOMAS E 

6489579000 DOOLITTLE THOMAS E 

5810742000 DOROS RESTAURANT 

5810742000 DOROS RESTAURANT 

5810742000 DOROS RESTAURANT 

5810742000 DOROS RESTAURANT 

7777792105 DOROSZ WILLAM J JR 

041 1852160 DOUGLAS HENRY & MILDRED L 

006361 1 240 DOUGLAS NELSON E & PATRICIA B 

0443428780 DOWD KEVIN & CARYL E 

1782668980 DOWLING JAMES H & JULIA A 

1300741980 DOWNING MARY W 

6555163000 DOXAINC 

0210772520 DOYLE ANNE R 

6352884000 DPF AIR LEASE INC HI 

0483481260 DRAGO DOMINICK & DOROTHY 

4028065750 DRAGONE ALLAN R & KERR SUSAN JR 

1903430100 DRAKE DANIEL W& JUDITHS 

0622615140 DREWSEN EDMOND T JR & EUNICE H 

263401 2000 DRIFTWOOD COFFEE SHOP 

2558682600 DRIMMER GARY A & CANDACE 

4142696840 DRISCOLL PAUL J & HELEN M 

0092833060 DRUTN TERRANCE K & AVIS T 

5075039450 DRYDEN JOHN W & PATRICIA A 

4324851000 DRYWALL & ACOUSTICAL DIST INC 

0452639 170 DUBE Y GEORGE & EDITH 

0762680480 DUBIN RONALD N & MARIA E 

0443295450 DUBOIS ALEX & MONICA 

4877486000 DUBOIS CHEMICALS INC 

4027207000 DUCHESS OF MONROE INC 

459 1 129000 DUCHESS OF WALLINGFORD INC 

2882438110 DUDLEY ALFRED E & LOIS D 

5543012000 DUGAS BROTHERS 

045 1 895930 DUKE NORMAN A & EDNA H 

0483040370 DULSKI WALTER E & JUDITH E 

4535867040 DUNAGAN JOHN C & FRADESSA C 

4729216000 DUNKIN DONUTS 

5379003001 DUNKIN DONUTS OF BRISTOL 

0462293200 DUPLESE JAMES K & ELEANOR M 

1850769620 DUPONT BEATRICE 

1076264000 DUPONT TOBIN LEVIN CARB ERR Y OM 

0042672970 DUPREY FLORENCE 

0462089270 DUPUY JOHN F & BARBARA N 

0261871320 DURHAM HENRY & PATRICIA 

0812238960 DURKIN WILLIAM A JR & VIRGINIA 

0444072840 DUSH MICHAEL W & SUSAN D 

041 3235200 DUTTON JAMES J JR & NANCY D 

0578427000 DWIGHT FOOTE INC 

4952909000 DYER TECHNOLOGY INC 

0341415240 DYER THEODORE G & RUTH B 

3553099800 DYKEMA HENRY L & JUDITH K 

0822890000 DYMAX CORPORATION 

0952017600 DYSON ROSE M 

3320447000 ELK GLASS & SHADE 

0463854170 EARLE DAVID & SUSAN S 



HAMDENCT.CG 100.72 

LOS ANGELES CA, CG 228.32 

DANBUR Y CT, SUT 1 88.99 

NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 132.98 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 23 1.20 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 346. 80 

E GRANBY CT, SUT 346.74 

E GRANBY CT, SUT 437.21 

E GRANBY CT, SUT 476.45 

E GRANBY CT, SUT 52 1 .50 

E HARTFORD CT, IND 1 66.93 

BRANFORD CT, CG 23 1.92 

WOODSTOCK CT, CG 220.61 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 469.08 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 ,593.40 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 602.38 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 660.72 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 228.48 

WOODCLIFF LAKE NJ, SUT 2,766.21 

WILTON CT.CG 144.47 

NEW YORK NY, CG 132.41 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 87.43 

GREENWICH CT, CG 289.57 

SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 3 15.36 

WESTPORT CT, CG 216.79 

NORWICH CT, CG 126.04 

TERRYVILLE CT, CG 1 23.23 

SIMSBURY CT, CG 193.30 

WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 678.90 

MIDDLETOWN CT, CG 161.20 

GREENWICH CT, CG 389. 15 

CROMWELL CT.CG 106.63 

CINCINNATI OH, CORP 867.00 

MONROE CT, SUT 1 ,454.70 

WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 608.59 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 889.78 

TAFTVTLLE CT, SUT 208.81 

WALLINGFORD CT, CG 265.93 

STAMFORD CT, CG 580.70 

WESTPORT CT, CG 2,558.23 

WARWICK RI, SUT 386.55 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 651.05 

SEYMOUR CT, CG 1 35.74 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 288.80 

NEW LONDON CT, SUT 906.00 

S WINDSOR CT, CG 910.80 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 142.26 

GROTON CT, CG 1 16.00 

SOUTH NORWALK CT, CG 1 56.92 

GREENWICH CT, CG 530.06 

NORWICH CT, CG 338.47 

BERLIN CT, SUT 3,034.70 

HUDSON NH, SUT 218.01 

GALES FERRY CT, CG 1 16.40 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 345.24 

TORRTNGTON CT, SUT 648.59 

WINSTED CT, CG 553.90 

TAMPA FL, SUT 110.53 

WESTON CT, CG 486.20 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



55 



0843020710 
3158920000 
1091600320 
4181517000 
0576579000 
5412036000 
0685701000 
0443832670 
0443832670 
2668218000 
3603898790 
0490510750 
1220355360 
0642613310 
1832834250 
0768309000 
0062477850 
5614151765 
0567875000 
5526454000 
2973619510 
3776374000 
0811021310 
2655899840 
1282898180 
0412260620 
0402446080 
0481631370 
3993482000 
0471269550 
0482233130 
0482694250 
3580931760 
3580931760 
040261 1 170 
1232827300 
3881570000 
4812871000 
6405724000 
4827747000 
2091413800 
1041006070 
0771426980 
0401225750 
1202217180 
1202217180 
0764482360 
4853077880 
1202014260 
0441418910 
0462627960 
0663041640 
0663041640 
5724287760 
0490105770 
5080429000 
2845402000 
2042660640 
7777115196 



EARLEY JAMES J JR STORRS CT, CG 

EAST COAST ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICNEW HAVEN CT, SUT 



EASTMAN LUCIA D 

EASTSIDE DELI & CONVENIENCE 

ECOLAB INC 

ED BEATTIES RESTAURANT 

EDELWEISS RESTAURANT INC 

EDMONDS CHRISTIAN P & ALICE A 

EDMONDS CHRISTIAN P & ALICE A 

EDS REFRIGERATION SERVICE INC 

EDWARDS ALIDA B 

EGAN CHARLES P & JEAN S 

EHRICH LOUIS S JR 

EHRLICH MARTIN & GLADYCE 

EKEDAHL DAVID D & E PATRICIA 

EL TORERO INC 

ELDERT ROBERT W 

ELECTRIC INSURANCE CO 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES INC 

ELEGANT EVENTS INC 

ELICKER GORDON L & JOAN C 

ELJEN CORPORATION 

ELLIOTT EDWARD J 

ELLISON BRUCE L & JOAN M 

ELMO ROBERT A BARBARA JO 

ELMORE MARTIUS L & ELEANOR R 

ELOVICH MARSHALL & ARLENE 

ELYOSIUS DONALD A & BARBARA A 

ENDLEMAN GALLERY INC 



S NORWALK CT, CG 
NAUGATUCK CT, SUT 
AVENELNJ.SUT 
BRISTOL CT, SUT 
W HARTFORD CT, SUT 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
LEBANON CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
ENFIELD CT,CG 
WINCHESTER CENTER CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT.CG 
MILFORD CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
BEVERLY MA, F&NR 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
STORRS CT, CORP 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
UNIONVILLE CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
EAST HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 



ENGELBERGER JOSEPH F & MARGARETNEWTOWN CT, CG 



ENGELS KARL & BARBARA 
ENGLERT HERBERT C & ALICE 
ENGLISH ARTHUR R & ELLA M 
ENGLISH ARTHUR R & ELLA M 
ENOWTTCH BENNETT I & ELISA 
ENSLEIN ROBERT & FRANCES 
ENTRE COMPUTER CENTER 
ENTRE COMPUTER CENTERS OF VA IN 
ENVIRONMENT CONTROL CONN 
ENVIRONMENTAL MAINTENANCE CO 
EPPEHIMER WILLIAM H & MARGARET 
EPPLER EUGENE & GERTRUDE N 
EPSTEIN HENRIETTA 
EPSTEIN SIDNEY D & PAULA M 
ERNST ROBERT & JOSEPHINE 
ERNST ROBERT & JOSEPHINE 
ERNST ROBERT & SUSAN 
ERVIN DEAN W & CYNTHIA S 
ERWIN DOUGLAS R & MILDRED A 

Esposrro louis j & Josephine 
esposito william & marie 
estate of paul smith 
estate of paul smith 
estes rice 

estra hyman & shirley 
ethan allen computers inc 



NEW MILFORD CT, CG 
COLUMBIA CT, CG 
OLD LYME CT, CG 
OLD LYME CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
GREENWICH CT, SUT 
EXTON PA, SUT 
ENFIELD CT, SUT 
SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 
WATERTOWN CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
WATERBURY CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
ROXBURY CT, CG 
NEW LONDON CT.CG 
E HAVEN CT, CG 
TORRINGTONCT.FID 
TORRINGTON CT, FID 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, SUT 



EVANS & SUTHERLAND COMPUTER CO SALT LAKE CITY UT, CORP 
EVANS GEORGE M & LOUISE J COS COB CT, CG 

EVANS THOMAS M CHESTER CT. IND 



323.00 
1,855.34 
101.27 
144.59 
1,259.58 
335.19 
400.22 
203.16 
300.27 
440.69 
180.00 
115.40 
1,259.73 
414.60 
295.02 
285.19 
117.08 
18,767.28 
1,389.65 
1,155.06 
348.06 
548.20 
188.40 
143.90 
448.38 
336.04 
110.12 
181.30 
205.50 
815.48 
216.70 
1,241.36 
123.18 
123.18 
174.84 
981.62 
130.31 
136.49 
200.99 
457.07 
367.38 
189.03 
393.90 
169.56 
166.25 
647.48 
115.22 
108.31 
123.09 
173.71 
356.27 
806.34 
107.01 
282.06 
589.20 
14,242.69 
327.60 
124.04 
136.33 



56 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0447426770 EVANS THOMAS M ffl 

0447426770 EVANS THOMAS M m 

0943268900 EV ANSON PAUL J & CAROL L 

0441842270 EVERETT JAMES 

0830100290 EVILIA ALEXANDER V & IDA 

2211063450 EWING ROBERT P & PHYLLIS J 

561 4326765 EXCELSIOR INSURANCE COMPANY 

5710991000 EXECUTIVE LAWN MOWING SERVICE 

4990511000 EXPOSURES INC 

0413826890 EZZES STEVEN 

6067862000 F C R INC DELAWARE 

1732417840 FAIR ANN 

6440580000 FAIRCHILD PATRICIA 

0486672140 FALCIGNO STEPHEN 

4816161000 FALLS CREEK FARM INC 

0193405780 FAR ROBERT A & SHEILA E 

3513615550 FARLEY JOHN U & ANN J JR 

0404887020 FARLEY MICHAEL A 

5610217762 FARMERS & TRADERS LIFE INS CO 

2830127790 FARNSWORTH NORMAN & ANNE 

2830127790 FARNSWORTH NORMAN & ANNE 

0451284730 FARRICIELLI VINCENT S & JOSEPHI 

1316475320 FARRILL BRYSON F 

0440560540 FARRINGTON ISABELLE 

4827663000 FAST FINGERS ORCHESTRAS INC 

0372001950 FAULISE SALVATORE V & ANITA 

2113610330 FAUST HALLEY & RUTH A 

0023839220 FAUVER JONATHAN G & JANET L 

4093258000 FAVORITE THINGS 

0401483300 FEDERKIEWICZ NELLIE S & THEODOR 

0454078560 FEDUS ALICE L 

0414006710 FEDUS STEPHEN M & ELIZABETH LEE 

0463498030 FEIGHERY JOHN J & SHARON M JR 

0490185000 FEINSTEIN ARTHUR W&RHODAG 

5552294000 FEMIA LANDSCAPING INC 

0453602900 FENNEY PHILIP W & ELIZABETH 

4194014040 FENTRISS RAY H& JANE M 

4194014040 FENTRISS RAY H& JANE M 

0404288760 FERGUSON ELIZABETH 

0404288760 FERGUSON ELIZABETH 

1333097660 FERGUSON JOHN J & KAREN S 

062403 1 550 FERGUSON WILLIAM W & LYNETTE B 

3693679890 FERRAR CARL M & JUDITH D 

0432642520 FESTA RICHRD M 

0451013170 FEWESIDA 

0463646 1 1 FEWES SUSAN 

4985099000 FIBERMUX CORPORATION 

5614409765 FIDELITY & GUARANTY INS UNDWRT 

0494819700 FIELD MICHAEL S & JENNY C 

061 1 808760 FILIPETTI MAURICE & OLGA 

0434853670 FILLORAMO JOHN N & PEGGY O 

475 1 475090 FINDELL LESLIE & ALICE 

2684047840 FINE JERROLD N & SALLY ANN 

0483076640 FINE MANUEL & LEAH 

0203801330 FINKEL STEVEN & ROBIN H 

1 53348 1 560 FINN DANIEL R & PHYLLIS R 

0473698990 FINN HETTY 

046267 1 630 FIORTTO MICHAEL & CATHERINE 

0400107810 FIORTTO VICTOR & MARY 



CHESTER CT, CG 194.70 

CHESTER CT, CG 194.70 

WILTON CT, CG 108.90 

BRANFORD CT, CG 236.96 

MERTDENCT.CG 328.98 

EASTON CT, CG 545.29 

KEENE NH, F&NR 2,555.58 

SANDY HOOK CT, SUT 130.50 

NORWALK CT, SUT 441.53 

WESTPORT CT, CG 3 ,649.50 

STRATFORD CT, CORP 242.30 

DARTEN CT, CG 992.70 

FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 151.15 

BRANFORD CT, CG 225.70 

MOOSUP CT, CORP 144.20 

WEST REDDING CT, CG 144. 14 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 86.27 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 133.83 

SYRACUSE NY, F&NR 471.19 

MERTDEN CT, CG 1 37.44 

MERTDEN CT, CG 137.44 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 128.59 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 323.50 

NEW YORK NY, CG 994.69 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 410.41 

WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 332.24 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 56.92 

H ARWTNTON CT, CG 1 8 1 .02 

DURHAM CT, SUT 593.22 

HARTFORD CT, CG 108.39 

COLCHESTER CT, CG 204.36 

COLCHESTER CT, CG 1 69. 84 

STAMFORD CT, CG 178.40 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 161.75 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 464.40 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 534.33 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 171.02 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 174.33 

DARIENCT.CG 913.13 

DARTEN CT,CG 1,396.50 

GREENWICH CT, CG 239.09 

HIGGANUM CT, CG 1 13.26 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 3 13.94 

WILTON CT, CG 133.79 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 584.30 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 305.53 

CHATSWORTH CA, SUT 2,206.52 

BALTIMORE MD, F&NR 1 1 ,004.08 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 692.41 

BRISTOL CT, CG 256.46 

COLCHESTER CT, CG 484.64 

BRANFORD CT, CG 225.77 

UNION NJ, CG 24,605.37 

WESTPORT CT, CG 149.29 

ROCKY HILL CT, CG 128.60 

GREENWICH CT, CG 32 1 .60 

GREENWICH CT, CG 125.03 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 37. 80 

BRISTOL CT.CG 272.17 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



57 



1313066320 FIRMERY ROBERT & JANET 

5874532000 FIRST PHONE OF NEW ENGLAND INC 

1 32321 1 860 FISCHER PETER F & JUDY C 

3204025550 FISCHER RONALD P & LINDA M 

0420137810 FISHBERG ROSALIND F 

047 1 89 1 100 FISHER BERNARD C & PATRICIA 

5722533000 FISHER BUSINESS SYSTEMS INC 

1262262550 FISHER C HERBERT 

056349 1 830 FISHER DAVID A JR & CAROLE F 

0413085210 FISHER FRANK & ANN 

044321 8730 FISHER PETER B & CAROLYN S 

0682446720 FISHER RAYMOND G & RUTH B 

0444612930 FISHM AN MICHAEL B 

0432429680 FISKE ROBERT B & JANET T 

5062454250 FITCH KEITH L & LOUISE 

0490569670 FJTELSON IRVING & REBA 

3632044360 FITT PATRICIA H 

5695283000 FTTZGERALDS FOODS 

0551481000 FTTZPATRICKS INC 

0843015130 FLACKMAN DAVIDJ & GUILIANA 

3420270000 FLAME REFRACTORIES INC 

0193854670 FLANAGAN SUSAN M 

0761293420 FLAX GERTRUDE S 

0761293420 FLAX GERTRUDE S 

0761293420 FLAX GERTRUDE S 

1753494300 FLINT DENNIS F & NANCY C 

6460059000 FLYNN CHECKSFIELD ASSOC INC 

0412614040 FLYNN DONALD P & FRANCES 

4850543220 FOGARTY WILMA WELLS 

0453040470 FOLB STEVEN M 

0453036620 FOLSOM MARGARET 

0464494160 FONDA ALBERT & SANDRA 

047 1 833200 FONTAINE GEORGE S & ELSIE G 

3660382400 FORD GEORGE A & MARGARET F 

0582692000 FORDH AM DISTRIB UTORS INC 

0013247860 FOREMAN RICHARD A & HEDY B 

1292605030 FORMAN PAUL F & MARKS BARBARA 

1223690190 FORMATO ANTHONY J & LORETTA A 

0453805750 FORSBERG BEATRICE M 

0692685000 FOSSUM ERIC R & NANCY W 

0902450100 FOWLER JACQUELINE 

0482271820 FOX LAURETTA J 

5604723000 FRANCES JEWELERS INC 

5078290000 FRANCIS BIS INC 

0671805620 FRANK IRMA 

1222635960 FRANK JOHN T & DORIS I 

0292628390 FRANK ROBERT A & CYNTHIA 

0963840290 FRANK STEVE M & SUSAN 

1 163467080 FRANKEL MARTIN & JEAN 

0803668000 FRANKLIN DISTRIBUTORS INC 

0473275060 FRANKS ALBERT & ROSLYN 

0963221720 FRANTZJACKT 

0572282560 FRANTZ LEROY & SHEILA G 

0453483250 FRASER DONALD S & G ELLEN 

0443237610 FRATTAROLI ANTHONY & CARMELA 

0462066070 FRECHETTE ROGER & BARBARA 

6197552000 FREDDIES GIANT GRINDERS 

3323030920 FREEHLING WILLIAM W & ALISON G 

7777111650 FREWR 



DARIENCT.CG 610.22 

REVERE MA, SUT 1 ,083.23 

MONROE CT, CG 106.20 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 1 02.20 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 522.09 

AVON CT, CG 262.98 

MARIETTA GA, SUT 2,047.25 

GREENWICH CT.CG 157.63 

CANTON CT.CG 123.00 

LITCHFIELD CT, CG 407.39 

NEW LONDON CT, CG 167.57 

GREENWICH CT, CG 170. 10 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 252.09 

DARIEN CT, CG 682.38 

WESTPORT CT, CG 255.60 

NORWALK CT, CG 624.59 

BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 1 89. 13 

SIMSBURY CT, SUT 2,280.90 

ANSONIA CT, SUT 6,081.71 

GREENWICH CT, CG 175.63 

OAKBORO NC, SUT 2,358. 15 

S WINDSOR CT, CG 564. 86 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 363.50 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 296.80 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 267. 1 1 

CHARLOTTE NC, CG 273.50 

IPSWICH MA, CORP 250.00 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 3,789.35 

DARIENCT.CG 1,081.01 

BOCA RAT AN FL, CG 409. 86 

ARLINGTON WA, CG 174. 10 

HAMDENCT.CG 116.28 

WATERBURY CT, CG 219.50 

NOANK CT, CG 465.00 

HARTFORD CT, ALC 5,098.95 

STAMFORD CT, CG 179. 87 

BRANFORD CT, CG 255.70 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 244.00 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 166. 15 

SIMSBURY CT, CG 342.65 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 ,216.44 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 398.89 

NEW PRESTON CT, SUT 418.10 

ALBUQUERQUE NM, SUT 167.21 

WEST REDDING CT, CG 324.68 

SHERMAN CT.CG 120.38 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 1 ,672. 86 

HAMDENCT.CG 178.70 

COSCOBCT.CG 109.44 

S WINDSOR CT, ALC 1 ,073.59 

E NORWALK CT, CG 718.85 

NEW CANAAN CT.CG 139.44 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 ,357.21 

PLYMOUTH CT, CG 105.56 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 88.89 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 386.48 

PLAINVILLE CT, SUT 1 19.37 

BROOKLYN CT, CG 293.30 

NEW HAVEN CT. IND 480.00 



58 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0451658310 FREY HENRY J & AUDREY W 

0052640610 FRIDAY JOHN E & JUDITH F 

2051612360 FRIEDMAN BEATRICE S 

0933830770 FRIEDMAN JAY M & KAREN 

0913095100 FRIEDMAN JOEL S & MARJORIE L 

3649472000 FRIENDLY FARMS INC 

0422440560 FRITZ ROBERT B 

1 193427680 FRYMANN HANS & JOYCE 

4781050000 FUJI JAPANESE RESTAURANT 

048 1 270780 FULLER DANIEL B & K ATHERINE 

7777 1 1 5429 FUNK LOUIS A 

1883081610 FURMAN ROBERT J & DOLORES C 

4809240000 FURNITURE IN PARTS INC 

0651422000 FUSCOSINC 

1041850370 FUSFELD HERBERT I & RUTH L 

0975011000 FUSS ONEILLINC 

0725 143000 G & G DISTRIBUTORS INC 

6382071000 G & G HOME VIDEO GAMES 

0743475030 GABELLI MARIO 

4323416000 GAFFNEY BENNETT AND ASSOCIATES 

0622617800 GAFFNEY BERNARD F & MARY C 

1202666290 GAGLIARDI J F JR & K G 

0455085730 GALA MANSUKHLAL & M M 

1353841130 GALBRAITH JOHN C & JEANNE M 

04230549 1 GALLICCHIO ANTHONY H & JOANNE T 

041 2294790 GALLICCHIO DANIEL R & GLADYS K 

0444028320 GALLO ANTHONY J & SUSAN G 

0475263690 GALLON MICHAEL C 

0433835700 GALT ELEANOR W 

1 293 896780 G ALVIN BARRY W & MTTZI J 

0473446020 GAMBLE GEORGE H & JUDITH B UI 

0452216440 GAMER LOUIS & MARGARET 

0476808560 GAMMIE ANTHONY P & ELIZABETH 

3264460200 GANT JAMES J & CLAUDIS K 

1022218550 GANZ PETER & GISELE 

261 6494250 GARCIA EMJXIO & CLAUDIA B 

0412872250 GARDELLA CONNIE 

0402851770 GARDELLA NORMA 

0445038920 GARDNER HERBERT & ANN 

5724470620 GAREY HOWARD & CAROL 

1192439710 GARI MICHAEL V & MARILOU 

1 062489 1 1 G AROFALO ROY L & MARY 

1 062489 1 1 G AROFALO ROY L & MARY 

1473204190 GARRETT DAVID G 

0801548000 GARRISON SAND GRAVEL INC 

0552685130 GARTNER GIDEON I 

0411883140 GARVEY EDWARD J 

3640710640 GARWOOD JOHN H & KATHREINE R 

36407 1 0640 GARWOOD JOHN H & KATHREINE R 

5054523001 GAS TURBINE CORPORATION 

3983012240 GATES THANIEL A 

7777 111589 G AUDRE AU PHILIP AND ROSEM ARIE 

1133237390 GAUSS CATHARINE D 

0412267510 GAYLEY OLIVER & JOAN 

5050937560 GAYLORD SHERWOOD B & LOIS R 

0853044 1 1 G A YNES PHILIP M & SUZ AN F 

042240 1190 GEER EARL & ELLEN 

1 562289770 GEILS JOHN H & VIRGINIA M 

0443801300 GELLERT HENRY N & BEATRICE 



MANCHESTER CT, CG 105.92 

OLD LYME CT, CG 218.25 

STAMFORD CT, CG 230.83 

WEST REDDING CT, CG 140. 10 

STAMFORD CT, CG 231.03 

NORWALK CT, SUT 222.27 

STRATFORD CT, CG 263.86 

WESTPORT CT, CG 262.20 

WEST HARTFORD CT, SUT 328.64 

STONINGTON CT, CG 98 1 .65 

NEW MILFORD CT, IND 132.00 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 447.05 

NEW YORK NY, U 1 ,209.54 

OAKVILLE CT, SUT 258. 15 

STAMFORD CT, CG 828.94 

MANCHESTER CT, SUT 1 ,122.42 

D ANBURY CT, SUT 1 ,649.69 

SANTA CLARA CA, SUT 328.32 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1,017.40 

NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 729.41 

BROOKFTELD CT, CG 420.49 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 1 66.05 

N HAVEN CT.CG 162.68 

SHERMAN CT.CG 330.02 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 1 63.70 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 200.74 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 160.56 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 1 87.80 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 122.90 

TORRINGTON CT, CG 290.5 1 

SHELTONCT.CG 128.60 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 381.75 

WESTPORT CT, CG 259.32 

WESTON CT.CG 629.01 

WESTPORT CT, CG 669.96 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 1 80.62 

E NORWALK CT, CG 169.88 

E NORWALK CT, CG 108. 15 

NORWALK CT, CG 1 63.98 

WESTPORT CT, CG 11 8. 16 

PORTLAND ME, CG 844.44 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 00.40 

GREENWICH CT, CG 308.22 

EASTONCT.CG 119.04 

CHAPLIN CT, SUT 110.41 

NEW YORK NY, CG 636.41 

WOUTHPORT CT, CG 332.50 

N BRANFORD CT, CG 133.20 

N BRANFORD CT, CG 133.20 

E GRANBY CT, SUT 2,623.33 

NEW YORK NY, CG 236.40 

MERIDEN CT, IND 382.50 

NEW YORK NY, CG 690.67 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 138.38 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 29.62 

WESTON CT.CG 212.82 

WOODSTOCK CT, CG 3,691.99 

GREENWICH CT, CG 483.65 

NEWTOWN CT, CG 456.70 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



59 



4764049000 GENERAL BUSINESS PRODUCTS INC 

0588921000 GENERAL TRUCK LEASING CO THE 

2900744830 GENESIS INSURANCE COMPANY 

0441243440 GENGA ARMANDO & DOROTHY 

0433890360 GENGRASGUYB 

0203660360 GENNARI JOHN M & DIANE L 

0472440440 GENOVESI DONALD & MARY 

5617683830 GENSTAR INDEMNITY COMPANY 

0702092370 GENTEALE JOHN T & MARIE B 

0462494360 GENTILE JAMES & MARIBETH 

0485209590 GENTILE RICHARD S & MARY A 

0462810800 GENTILE VINCENZO & ASSUNTA 

1112811610 GEOGHAN JOSEPH E 

0401228470 GEORGE JAMES M 

0931672120 GERBER JOSEPH H & SONIA 

0580605000 GERBER SCIENTIFIC INC 

0650359850 GERLIJOHNE 

0282223070 GEROULD LESLEY C 

1183696890 GERRTTY CYNTHIA 

0412235470 GERSTEN AARON L & SANDRA P 

1003260140 GERSTNER LOUIS V & ROBINS L JR 

0523227740 GERSTNER RICHARD T & MARY JOETT 

1054245340 GEWIRTZ SCOTT 

0414668790 GIANNTTTI SABINO 

5500418000 GIANT BEDDING & BRASS INC 

5355714000 GIANT OAK HUNTING & FISHING 

0440176840 GIBBONS MARY 

0480794050 GIBBS LEROY ft EMILY 

1242888310 GIBIAN GERALD Z & ROSALIE 

0061676100 GIBSON R DANA & LESLIE L 

0432624950 GIFFORD WRIGHT D JR & THELMA J 

5503933000 GIFT BOX INC 

0143236280 GILBERT BECKWITH & KATHARINE S 

1653494070 GILDEA JOHN W & AMY ANN 

1452036850 GILL ROBERT C & OLIVIA 

0473237400 GILL THOMAS D & MARIE T 

0425604190 GILLESPIE CIRI L 

5180159070 GILLETTE LESLIE H & FLORENCE W 

0463821960 GILLIS RUTH H 

042 1 85 1 220 GJLMAN CHARLES M & MARY J 

6153753000 GINGER CRAFT CO 

1773690790 GINSBERG PAUL & RONNIE 

0624463740 GIONIS THOMAS 

0424080670 GIORDANO ANTHONY V & SUSAN E 

0492695170 GIPSTEIN EDITH G 

6219760000 GIRISH CHOKSHI CPA 

6219760000 GIRISH CHOKSHI CPA 

6369409000 GIST INC 

0463679860 GITTLEMAN ALAN L & ALISON D 

0102008460 GLANVILLE EFFIE J 

5364872140 GLASER LEONARD & AJLEENFELDMAN 

0422858040 GLASS GEORGE & ROBERTA 

5849195000 GLASS INDUSTRIES 

0553661020 GLASS ROBERT & ZELDA 

0482473 130 GLASSMAN ABRAHAM ft BEVERLY 

0652477460 GLAVIN WILLIAM F & CECILY M 

0483221570 GLEBA PAUL F 

0491016170 GLENNEY EVERETT S & M NAOMI 

03 1 2084800 GLENNEY SHIRLEY K 



FARMINGDALE NY, SUT 650.51 

SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 22 1 .62 

STAMFORD CT 3,968.87 

STRATFORD CT, CG 1 96.73 

LYME CT, CG 272.24 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 103.64 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 236.37 

STAMFORD CT 1,650.87 

GREENWICH CT, CG 121.78 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 104.24 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 275.30 

DARIENCT.CG 152.05 

WILTON CT, CG 173.70 

DANBURY CT, CG 108.04 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 ,430.72 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 1 4,856.58 

GREENWICH CT, CG 220.70 

ROW A YTON CT, CG 11 8. 12 

ROWAYTON CT, CG 291.55 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 604.97 

GREENWICH CT, CG 126.52 

STAMFORD CT, CG 342.04 

CHICAGO IL.CG 174.27 

STAMFORD CT, CG 293.39 

ORANGE CT, SUT 423.01 

N BRANFORD CT, SUT 1,279.76 

WATERBURY CT, CG 708.65 

MJDDLEBUR Y CT, CG 1 27. 17 

GREENWICH CT, CG 166.46 

WASHINGTON CT, CG 247.01 

VERNON CT.CG 192.10 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 213.32 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 ,898. 16 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 749.97 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 30.36 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 780.76 

GREENWICH CT, CG 658.02 

KENSINGTON CT, CG 103.15 

FAIR HAVEN CT, CG 205.68 

GILMAN CT, CG 274.68 

DARIENCT.SUT 100.12 

STAMFORD CT, CG 164.30 

STAMFORD CT, CG 342.44 

SHELTONCT.CG 135.80 

NEW LONDON CT, CG 144.90 

ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 282.76 

ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 282.76 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 265. 89 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 328.27 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 1 22.75 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 131.00 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 04.05 

CLEVELAND OH, CORP 486.60 

LOS ANGELES CA, CG 287.00 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, CG 177.77 

WELLESLE Y MA, CG 560. 83 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 177.72 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 11 8.05 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 1 36.39 



60 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



4598876000 
3545977000 
0802098370 
0093836660 
0471052220 
0970768800 
3013255370 
2126696980 
1382639130 
0430171400 
0860915310 
0823081090 
2020925310 
9200001415 
0492654870 
1534806200 
1013806170 
1042025660 
0502603900 
0964072620 
2202866810 
0803821690 
0864223660 
3804666470 
1341400410 
1542816670 
6407514000 
0717512000 
3853448980 
0553057560 
2990083000 
0420173690 
0483210290 
0404200990 
0472454720 
0411035320 
0442685570 
0444062070 
0051885600 
0482613110 
0492219740 
0262684990 
0431688270 
0404027390 
6395412000 
5747084000 
5747084000 
5614581765 
4397303000 
5785663210 
0182605960 
2544431730 
0473830260 
0431653940 
0063673540 
0433099820 
5928460000 
0400796640 
6827695000 



GLI TECHNICAL SERVICES INC 
GLOBAL SOFTWARE INC 
GLUCKMAN THEODORE P & CAROL 
GOBIN MICHAEL J & ANNE R 
GODBOUT ARTHUR R 
GODLAIUSKAS WALTER & ANNE 
GOEBEL TIM H & LINDA L 
GOLD EDWARD W & ELLEN K 
GOLDBERG ALAN & MARJORIE S 
GOLDBERG DAVID M & ANNA H 
GOLDBERG EDWIN L 
GOLDBERG STANLEY & BENAY 
GOLDEN FREDERICK & PEARL B 



BOUTTE LA, SUT 
RALEIGH NC, BU 
WESTPORTCT.CG 
BROAD BROOK CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
COLCHESTER CT, CG 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
PIKESVILLE MD, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
NEW LONDON CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
WESTPORTCT.CG 



GOLDEN HILL UNITED METHODIST CH BRIDGEPORT CT 



GOLDFARB LOUIS 
GOLDMAN KENNETH & JODY 
GOLDMAN LLOYD M & VICTORIA A 
GOLDMAN STANLEY & MATHILDA 
GOLDSTEIN IRVING & VALERIE 
GOLUB SCOTT & MICHELE 
GONSALVES DONALD & SYLVIA R 
GOODBODY MICHAEL P & HOLLY C 
GOODKIND DAVID J & SANDRA G 
GOODSPEED WILLIAM B & USA M 
GOODSTADT GEORGE & ALEXANDRA 



ROCKVILLE CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT.CG 
BROOKFIELD CTR CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 



GOODWIN JERRY P & BETSY R 

GOODWIN LANDSCAPE AND CONSTRUCT, EASTFORD CT, SUT 

GORDON S GATEWAY TO SPORTS LTD COS COB CT, SUT 



GORDON STEWART G & SANDRA E 
GORE EDWARD W JR & MARCIA L 
GORVETT R L ETAL 
GOSLEE EDWARD R 
GOTCH JOHN & ARLENE 
GOTTLIEB HARVEY J 
GOTTLIEB JOSEPH M & EDITH A 
GOUDREAU BESS A 
GOUIN KENNETH L & ELSIE 
GOULD THOMAS & JEWEL 
GOULET RALPH B & PAULINE M 
GRAB AU JOHN D & SHARON J 
GRABINSKY ALAN R & SYLVIA E 
GRAF CARL N & GENEVIEVE 
GRAHAM ALBERT C & ROSEMARY 
GRANATO JOSEPH M JR 
GRAND CENTRAL HARDWARE 
GRANDVIEW LANDSCAPING 
GRANDVIEW LANDSCAPING 
GRAPHIC ARTS MUTUAL INS CO 
GRASS VALLEY GROUP INC 
GRASSHOFF SVEN K & TORIA H 
GRAVES BRUCE 
GRAVES NORRIS & MERILYN 
GRAY JOHN F 
GRAY JOSEPH & DOLORES 
GRAY VERNON C & MARY E 
GRAZIOSO FRANK M & MARY 
GREAT FRAME UP 
GREELEY WILDER J & BENTTA P 
GREEN LINE GROUP INC 



GREENWICH CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
WINDSOR CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
MADISON CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
PORTLAND CT.CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
E HARTFORD CT, CG 
TITUSVILLE FL, CG 
WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
S WINDSOR CT, CG 
MILFORDCT.SUT 
MONROE CT, SUT 
MONROE CT, SUT 
UTICA NY, F&NR 
GRASS VALLEY CA, SUT 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
WETHERSFIELD CT.CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
EAST BURKE VT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
BOSTON MA, SUT 



586.05 

5,712.86 
144.08 
103.92 

1,117.12 
344.16 
190.85 
115.04 
508.04 
143.74 
345.48 
676.80 
105.79 
120.00 
709.59 
870.43 
361.33 
188.40 
238.56 
163.16 
233.10 
156.06 
296.92 
579.10 
415.30 
409.14 
199.25 
295.45 

1,003.00 
544.40 

1,159.30 
910.60 
104.30 
255.80 
120.16 
266.52 
491.60 
481.35 
266.58 
207.62 
129.40 

1,957.68 
102.38 
532.40 
252.90 
311.44 
332.32 

2,010.45 
928.60 
100.78 
181.99 
296.64 
1 10.28 
155.93 
933.70 
104.46 
344.70 
697.58 
809.70 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



61 



0828335000 GREEN MACHINE INC 

0584524000 GREEN MANOR CORPORATION 

5812383000 GREENACRES LANDSCAPPING 

4977518000 GREENFIELD LIQUOR SHOP INC 

0332471480, GREENSPAN TAUBE G 

5514195000 GREENWICH GALLERY OF AMERICAN 

0436448230 GREGG JEFFREY J 

0474206880 GREGOR ANDREW & PHYLLIS R 

0483057640 GRELLO JOHN & MARY 

5154258170 GREMP WILLIAM J & CHRISTINE 

0147561000 GRESTO POWER EQUIPT CO 

0986661000 GREYSTONE REST HOME INC 

0482872560 GRIESE CELIA B 

2090058000 GRIFFIN FORD INC 

2090058000 GRIFFIN FORD INC 

2183836000 GRIMES EDMUND C & KAREN R 

0406264290 GRIMES TIMOTHY W & SUSAN 

1 144692650 GRTNBERG YAIR & COYLE ELIZABETH 

0462897760 GRINOLD WILLIAM B ft JOYCE A 

0931413390 GROSS MELVIN L & FRANCES R 

1264262860 GROSS RICHARD A & SHEILA G 

0475222070 GRUBE PAUL & SHARON J 

0410942880 GRUCE STEPHEN E & ANNA H 

1002008860 GRYNA FRANK M & DORIS A 

0876235000 GTE SERVICE CORP 

0413036000 GUGLIOTTI ELMO & CARMELA 

6291140000 GUIDO MURPHYS PUB 

4835195000 GUILFORD TAVERN 

0483071030 GUTLLEMETTE JEAN C & THERESE 

0483071040 GUILLEMETTE THERESE G 

0893085570 GULDEN FRANK & JENNIE G m 

7777117300 GUNAS DAVID L 

0481603090 GUPTTLL WTNTHROP H JR & CAROLYN 

048 1 075240 GUSTTNE NELSON R & MILDRED 

1443243720 GUTHRIE JAMES R & ANN T 

0432473050 GUTMANN GEORGE F & JOAN A 

1573247820 GYESKY EUGENE & JOAN 

0560391000 H WTLLEY INCORPORATED 

0560391000 H WILLEY INCORPORATED 

1 0924 1 7040 HA AG A JOHN C & PAULINE P 

0463882950 HABICHT JEFFREY L 

1331685610 HADD AD EDWARD & JUDITH 

0952855 130 HAGEN WINSTON H & SALLY B 

049 1 408640 H AGGSTROM OLLE E & ELAINE P 

1562494580 HATDOUS NICHOLAS & GEORGIA 

0600247000 HALE ENTERPRISES INC 

0492857640 HALEY LESLIE A & BEVERLY K 

1276419890 HALL ANDREW J & CHRISTINE C 

038201 4690 HALL VINCENT C & PHYLLIS Y 

0403462450 HALLAWAY ROBERT S & DIANNE G 

0663848300 HALLOCK GERARD P & JUDITH S 

1072412990 HALLORAN LEO A & MARILYN E 

1023069100 HAMAR MARTIN R& ANNE D 

5374772000 HAMDEN MART CHESS KING INC 

5456132000 HAMELIN & SONS INC 

0403885150 HAMILTON ELIZABETH R 

5 1 1 3277420 HAMILTON RA YNER M & PATRICIA L 

0455215890 HAMILTON SCOTT W 



BLOOMFTELD CT, SUT 678.21 

MANCHESTER CT, CORP 408.50 

E HAVEN CT, SUT 194.29 

FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 679.25 

STAMFORD CT, CG 232.64 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 3 1 8.90 

BOTSFORD CT, CG 385.29 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 148.59 

WINDSOR LOCKS CT, CG 373.94 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 350.90 

NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 337.33 

PORTLAND CT, CORP 474.50 

STONTNGTON CT, CG 1 ,635.03 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 9,3 1 8.49 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 9,318.49 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 137.61 

HAMDEN CT, CG 104.03 

NEW PRESTON CT, CG 128.48 

WOODSTOCK CT, CG 101.90 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 182.65 

ROXBURYCT.CG 366.80 

xMYSTIC CT, CG 464.22 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 179.00 

TAMPA FL, CG 142.87 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 28,766.54 

WATERBURYCT.CG 201.82 

PUTNAM CT, SUT 428.63 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 904.05 

HARTFORD CT, CG 135.42 

HARTFORD CT, CG 246.38 

WARREN RI, CG 130.58 

HEBRON CT, IND 2,579.40 

EAST HADDAM CT, CG 678.43 

MERTDENCT.CG 626.40 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 109.30 

SHELTONCT.CG 366.89 

COS COB CT, CG 350.22 

NORWICH CT, TOB DIS 240.44 

NORWICH CT, TOB DIS 240.44 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 470.56 

EAST HAMPTON CT, CG 109.44 

WESTPORTCT.CG 198.80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 473.80 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 330. 13 

STORRS CT, CG 169.20 

EAST LYME CT, SUT 845.01 

OLD MYSTIC CT, CG 1 62.74 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 1 ,286.59 

BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 375.20 

GUILFORD CT, CG 24 1 .64 

ROWAYTON CT, CG 143.00 

NEW CANAAN CT.CG 192.07 

WILTON CT.CG 168.00 

WORCESTER MA, SUT 149.05 

BRISTOL CT, CORP 150.00 

DARIENCT.CG 2,966.27 

GREENWICH CT, CG 108.03 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 201.90 



62 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0410187360 HAMILTON WILLIAM 

0480501250 HAMLIN COLIN F & SALLY W 

0433261570 HAMMETT JON C & MARTHA S 

4569232000 HAMPTON INN MILFORD 

0580001000 HAMRAHSINC 

0481643820 HANDLEYJEANM 

0493025480 HANIC JOHANNA 

0893 88 1 950 H ANNA GEORGE & TONI 

4498762000 HANSENS LANDSCAPING 

0622413410 HANSON JOSEPH J & GLORIA 

0578351000 HAR CONN CHROME CO 

1141295390 HARAN RICHARD F«& ANN T 

1141295390 HARAN RICHARD F & ANN T 

5004957000 HARBOR MOTORS INC 

0481471700 HARDIMAN ELIZABETH N 

047 1 202330 H ARDISTY CHESTER & GERTRUDE 

622321 8000 HARGROVE MICHAEL J 

622321 8000 HARGROVE MICHAEL J 

622321 8000 HARGROVE MICHAEL J 

04256508 1 H ARM ATY EUGENE & CAROL 

0495309000 HARNISCHFEGER CORPORATION 

6393730000 HAROLD LUMBER AND BUILDING MA 

2193483740 HARPER HOWARD P & BARBARA G 

3989159000 HARRIS ENTERPRISE CORP 

0433884160 HARRISON CONSTANCE 

3643654990 HARRISON DONALD J & KAREN M 

0738088000 HARRISON INN 

4107477590 HARRISON WILLIAM H & JANE D 

0382402850 HARROP JAMES S & MARY C 

5151089000 HARRYS TX BARBECUE &AZ GRILL 

0512889210 HARSCHE FRANK M & REEDA B 

3693688840 HART JOHN M & ELIZABETH 

1 405847 170 HARTFORD KATHLEEN & JOHN 

6285514000 HARTFORD POSTAL EMPLOYEES CRE 

0877761001 HARTFORD PROVISION CO THE 

0462874900 HARTLEB ERIC H & EDITH R 

1283246330 HARTLEY CHARLES K & BEVERLY M 

0463482280 HARTLEY STEVEN R & SHIRLEY B 

0483632380 HARTMAN ESTELLE S 

0483632380 HARTMAN ESTELLE S 

1784041600 HARTMAN RAYMOND M& ANNE M 

1 54361 6840 HARTMAN ROBERT & CAROL 

1333298260 HARTNETT SEAN C & LESLIE 

0717868000 HARVEST BAKERY INC 

1513672930 HARVEY PETER A 

0482672390 HARWOOD PAUL H & SIBLY H JR 

447321 1000 HASKELL FIELD LANDSCAPES 

0412828580 HASSAN FOUAD M & NANCY 

0461873060 HATCH WALTER & JUNE 

1 2454823 1 H AUSLEIN JAMES N 

4103081000 HAWK TRANSPORTATION SERVICES IN 

0442695950 HAWLEY BRUCE B & JOSEPHINE S 

0411866810 HAYES MATTHEW J JR & HERMANCE 

0411866810 HAYES MATTHEW J JR & HERMANCE 

0453879940 HAYES VILMA C 

047 1 448040 HEALEY HENRY F & GENEVIEVE L 

6 1 37582000 HEALTH PAYMENT REVIEW INC 

1 26 1 804760 HE ANEY ROBERT S & MARGARET C 

0910904200 HEASLIP JENNIE F 



WATERBURY CT, CG 599.49 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 1 1 1 .06 

WINDHAM CT, CG 1 07.40 

MILFORD CT, RO 1 93.32 

MERIDENCT.SUT 220.21 

BRANFORD CT, CG 154.45 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 383.60 

BROOKFIELD CT, CG 1 39.27 

HUNTINGTON CT, SUT 194.99 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1,610.31 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 4,445. 16 

BRANFORD CT, CG 123.98 

BRANFORD CT, CG 123.98 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 5,499.08 

STAMFORD CT, CG 169.48 

WOODBURY CT, CG 249.71 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 2,776.00 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 1 ,032.00 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 477.00 

DANBURYCT,CG 129.60 

MILWAUKEE WI, SUT 287.33 

FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 68 1 .64 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 932.23 

MANCHESTER CT, SUT 133. 10 

NEWTOWN CT, CG 101.03 

AVONCT.CG 210.12 

GLEN COVE NY, RO 5,551.74 

OXFORD CT.CG 221.20 

AVONCT.CG 159.22 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 539.83 

W REDDING CT, CG 271.61 

SIMSBURY CT, CG 1,017.27 

SHERMAN CT.CG 176.47 

HARTFORD CT, BU 200.82 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 3,269.05 

NEWTNGTON CT, CG 141 .78 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 2 1 .03 

STAMFORD CT, CG 102.28 

NEW YORK NY, CG 470.3 1 

NEW YORK NY, CG 470.3 1 

GREENLAND NH, CG 285.30 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 470.00 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 259.78 

BRISTOL CT, CORP 136.50 

STONINGTON CT, CG 191.15 

ESSEX CT.CG 1,289.05 

CHESHIRE CT, SUT 293.95 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 114.51 

MERIDENCT.CG 199.22 

MILBURNNJ.CG 561.19 

MANCHESTER NH, MC 128.20 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 270. 15 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 151. 86 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 714.36 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 226.59 

DERBY CT,CG 101.37 

BOSTON MA, SUT 422.40 

BETHESD A MD, CG 204. 80 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 654.30 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



63 



1501272480 H EG ARTY WILLIAM E & BARBARA F 

1 44207 1 290 HEIDES'GER CLIFFORD F & CLAIRE S 

1074619970 HFJLIGENTHALER SHELLEY M 

0443276090 HELDMANN JAMES F & KAREN E 

0532888 1 80 HELSTERN LAWRENCE T & LENA A 

0424497 150 HEMMOCK FRANCIS R & SUSAN A 

475361 5460 HEMPEL DONALD J & PATRICIA L 

5028709000 HENDERSONS AUTO BODY INC 

1033080250 HENNESSEY JON M & DEBORAH 

1033080250 HENNESSEY JON M & DEBORAH 

083341 6930 HENSEL PAUL E & DIANE D 

508 1 286760 HENSKE JOHN & MARY ANNE 

0322406570 HENSON ARNOLD & CYNTHIA 

2863214700 HENZY CHARLES B & SUSAN C 

4464145000 HERTZ RENT A CAR 

4464145000 HERTZ RENT A CAR 

4464145000 HERTZ RENT A CAR 

0982449880 HERTZ RICHARD & MEYER DORIS 

0814081600 HERZOG ANDREW & BARBARA 

4873436000 HESTERBERG MARTNELLA 

5747951000 HEWITT RODERICK D 

1 133047180 HEWSON MICHAEL M & CATHERINE S 

5425475000 HI TECH SIDING ERECTORS INC 

6285001000 HIBERNIAN SOFTWARE 

5647675730 HJXEMAN ELLEN EARLEY 

0494456320 HILL B CHRISTOPHER & JOAN 

0491640540 HILLS FRANCES 

0402270470 HTMMELFARB CHARLES S & MARLENE 

0462894240 HINCKS WILLIAM T & CLAUDIA H 

0490123030 HINMAN JULIA K 

216281 4990 HTNRICHS JOHN R & MARGARET M 

0412440830 HOCHHEFMER IRENE 

02428908 1 HOCKSTADER ALAN F & BIRGITT A 

1263040240 HODGES JAMES L & JAMT P ROMA YK 

551 1816990 HODGSON RICHARD & GERLADINE R 

2154875410 HOENE MARY CHRISTINE 

0471025910 HOFFENBERG HERSCHEL B & FANNY 

0480356500 HOFFMAN KATHERTNE 

5 12321 1 000 HOFFMAN LANDSCAPING 

1 193632670 HOLBACK GEORGE EST OF 

0620773000 HOLDRJTX3E FARM NURSERY L\C 
0620773002 HOLDRJTX3E GARDENLAND 

062077300 1 HOLDRIDGE PL ANTLAND OF NORWIC 
2926749000 HOLLAND INC 

2904666 1 1 HOLLAND JAMES E 

2733876660 HOLLAND MICHAEL F & LOUISE G 

5829585000 HOLLANDS HALLMARK 

49 1 5064420 HOLLENB ERG DALE W & BETTY M 

1 903254450 HOLLID A Y RICHARD C & ARDIS S 

040 1 480520 HOLLOWA Y LOUISE J 

0732238070 HOLLYDAY RICHARD C & JANE P 

0491656150 HOLMES JAYNE 

054401 5390 HOLMES MARIANNE G 

4974476720 HOLMES RICHARD & SARAH 

0323 807550 HOLSTEIN JOHN P & LE ANNE 

0473697 140 HOLSTER ROBERT M & CARLOTTA D 

5737006220 HOLT ADRIAAN J & CAROLINE 

561 47 1 4765 HOME INDEMNITY CO INC 

2301091000 HOMEGUARDINC 



GREENWICH CT, CG 1,147.36 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 500.94 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 150. 94 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 506.75 

GEORGETOWN CT, CG 1 89.20 

DERBY CT.CG 120.01 

STORRS CT, CG 190.30 

MIDDLETO WN CT, SUT 1 82. 84 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 172.87 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 172.87 

MONROE CT, CG 123.66 

GREENS FARMS CT, CG 767.54 

GREENWICH CT, CG 517.51 

STONTNGTON CT, CG 686.59 

NORW ALK CT, SUT 1 ,25 8. 37 

NORWALK CT, SUT 1,419.04 

NOR WALK CT SUT 1 ,23 1 .79 

ESSEX CT,CG 1,043.94 

EASTON CT, CG 109.46 

WILTON CT, SUT 155.18 

KENSINGTON CT, SUT 1 8 1 .23 

ROSWELLGA, CG 100.52 

SOUTHTNGTON CT, CORP 790.00 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 152.25 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 274.43 

MADISON CT, CG 303.50 

WILTON CT, CG 125.60 

NEWTNGTON CT, CG 1 89.93 

MADISON CT, CG 134.53 

BURLINGTON CT, CG 395.30 

DARIENCT.CG 145.80 

NORWALK CT, CG 496.73 

GOSHEN CT, CG 205.32 

VERNON CT, CG 175.30 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 496.71 

KENT CT, CG 727.34 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 1 26.22 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 204.00 

WILTON CT, SUT 419.03 

E LYME CT, FID 3,226.18 

LEDYARD CT, SUT 2,754.08 

LEDYARD CT, SUT 858.44 

LEDYARD CT, SUT 672. 85 

F AIRFIELD CT, SUT 1 ,456. 84 

GREENWICH CT, CG 304.96 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 158.18 

FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 924.53 

AVONCT.CG 114.52 

WESTERLY RI, CG 440.75 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 170.56 

WILTON CT, CG 206.28 

DANBURY CT, CG 107.79 

SANTBELFL.CG 1,218.15 

WESTPORT CT, CG 392.29 

STONTNGTON CT, CG 286.25 

DARIENCT.CG 134.93 

POMPANO BCH FL, CG 1 60. 15 

NEW YORK NY, F&NR 29,728.79 

FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 935.42 



64 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0561696000 
0772415760 
2873885890 
0441429260 
1983670320 
1422244500 
1004218660 
0401034850 
0474027520 
0432848370 
0613861960 
3381209000 
1250391790 
3925971000 
0152622940 
0472807010 
0560284000 
5495880950 
5586091490 
0423065170 
0487038420 
3889854000 
0423452380 
0552422000 
0552422002 
0552422001 
1071655880 
5244454000 
0492008210 
0525639820 
0192456240 
0483649280 
0431609900 
0442293480 
0452843100 
6462410000 
6462410000 
2171022940 
4816179000 
5283443000 
0907444000 
0442687410 
1150754480 
0782288810 
0679621000 
0605444000 
0632430000 
4655734000 
0443234360 
1281804950 
4810149000 
6384457000 
6384440000 
3581097000 
4614574000 
6461727000 
5522586000 
0707208000 
0707208000 



HONEYWELL INC 

HONIG MARIAN 

HOO JOSEPH J C & MILAN M 

HOOKER THOMAS & JANE D 

HOOVER MICVHAEL 

HOPKINS RICHMOND B & BARBARA 

HORGAN CHRIS 

HOROWITZ WILLIAM & MIRIAM 

HORSMAN HAMILTON A & LUCIE B 

HOSKING RICHARD & JUDITH 

HOTCHKISS SHERMAN R & BARBARA 

HOTEL DATA SYSTEMS INC 

HOUH ANNISSIAN MARY 

HOUSE OF DOORS INC 



MINNEAPOLIS MN, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
COS COB CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
LAS VEGAS NV, CG 
RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
READING CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
NEWTOWN CT, CG 
MJXFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
WILTON CT, SUT 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
CHESHIRE CT, CORP 



HOUSTON GEORGE A & GWENDOLYN SSUFFIELD CT. CG 



HOWARD ALBERT J & MARY B 

HOWARD ARNOLD INC 

HOWARD RON & CHERYL 

HOWE ROGER E & CAROLYN R 

HOWELL DUANE R & MARGARET C 

HOWELL JOHN B & JENNE M 

HUB CAP STORE THE 

HUBBLE KENNETH & SUZANNE P 

HUDSON PAPER CO 

HUDSON PAPER COMPANY 

HUDSON PAPER COMPANY 

HUFNAGEL STANLEY & IRENE 

HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY 

HUGHES CALVIN T 

HUGHES THOAMS J & VIRGINIA A 

HUJDENKOPER PETER G & MARY B 

HULL ELIZABETH A 

HULME STEPHEN A & KATHLEEN 

HUME THOMAS & TULITA 

HUME WILLIAM H & ELAINE C 

HUNAN WOK 

HUNAN WOK 

HUNT HENRY G 

HUNTERS CONSIGNMENTS INC 

HUNTINGTON EARL L & PHYLLIS R 



ORANGE CT, CG 

WEST HAVEN CT, SUT 
LOS ANGELES CA, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
MILFORD CT, SUT 
BURLINGTON CT.CG 
STRATFORD CT, SUT 
STRATFORD CT, SUT 
STRATFORD CT, SUT 
WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 
LOS ANGELES CA, SUT 
WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
CHESHIRE CT, CG 
ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 
ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 
NORTH BRANFORD CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, SUT 
PALM CITY FL, CG 



HUNTINGTON POWER EQUIPMENT INC SHELTON CT, SUT 



HUROVITZ DAVID & MICHELLE 
HUSSEY ALEXANDER B & ANNE M 
HUTT IRWIN & JOANNE 
HYDRO AIR OF CONNECTICUT INC 
HYGRADE GAS SERVICE INC 



GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
ENFIELD CT, SUT 



HYGRADE TOOL MANUFACTURING CO PLAINVILLE CT, SUT 



I CANT BELIEVE ITS YOGURT 
IACOVO LOUIS J & RITA B 

rorrz Raymond & ruth 

ICING INC THE 

ICON CASH FLOW PARTNERS SERIES 

ICON CASH FLOW PARTNERS SERIES 

IDEAL SECURITY SYSTEMS INC 

IL FALCO INC 

IMAGE MANAGEMENT CORPORATION 

IMPACT PERSONNEL INC 

IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 



VERNON CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
FORESTVILLE CT, CG 
ENFIELD CT, CORP 
WHITE PLAINS NY, SUT 
WHITE PLAINS NY, SUT 
W HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
HUNTINGTON CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
S WINDSOR CT, SUT 
S WINDSOR CT, SUT 



32,415.12 
118.36 
662.39 
136.98 
981.68 
131.72 
271.30 
185.60 
602.40 
100.80 

1,682.89 
614.74 
859.38 

1,302.68 
132.11 
142.59 

1,677.47 
397.39 
111.87 
394.86 
131.30 
219.30 
155.96 
587.85 
424.12 
365.26 
239.80 
368.79 
281.73 
478.48 
602.09 

3,301.60 
127.47 
362.33 
149.38 
137.60 
139.60 
142.50 
197.81 
145.02 

1,789.79 
425.88 
163.46 

1,207.21 
331.21 
292.59 
168.18 
550.44 
420.39 
121.92 
324.20 
705.55 
440.86 
386.54 
802.85 
168.29 
637.32 
117.56 
147.41 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



65 



0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

0707208000 IMPERIAL CARPET WORKROOM INC 

2353217000 IMPORTED CARS OF STAMFORD INC 

2353217000 IMPORTED CARS OF STAMFORD INC 

04624 13810 INCLIMA ALPHONSE A & JUDITH 

3369592000 INDEX CORPORATION 

3064532000 INDUSTRIAL INGREDIENTS INC 

1061852000 INNKEEPERS OF PLAINVILLE INC 

1061852000 INNKEEPERS OF PLAINVILLE INC 

1 06 1 852000 INNKEEPERS OF PLAINVILLE INC 

5562608000 TNTERGRAPH CORPORATION 

0803 148000 INTERGRATED INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS 

3404043000 INTERLAKEN INN 

3894912000 INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATES U S A 

549292 1 000 INTERNATIONAL FASHION WATCH 

3276821000 INTERNATIONAL SCUBA CENTER LTD 

6217467000 INTUITIONS CAFE 

1303269130 IRVINE KENNETH & BETTTN A 

1142495340 ISAACS JED P 

1 37 1 61 2290 ISLER ERIC & INGE 

3986825000 ITA INC 

3986825000 ITA INC 

043 1 453750 IVES HAROLD E & ELAINE P 

048303 1 150 IWANICKI PAUL J & MAUREEN 

4031050000 J & J CONSULTING INC 

5367693000 J & K UNLIMITED INC 

5071204000 J&S HOME CARE 

2583680000 J C VENDING COMPANY 

6378046000 J D EDWARDS & COMPANY 

6378046000 J D EDWARDS & COMPANY 

6378046000 J D EDWARDS & COMPANY 

2673812000 J E I SERVICE INC 

0672360000 J H BARLOW PUMP SUPPLY INC 

0752212000 JJKINC 

0625012000 J M BENSON INC 

4606984000 JMSJDINC 

6711493000 J V R SYSTEMS INC 

2561090000 J WHITNEY FRAME GALLERY 

0463652610 JACHTMOWSKI STANLEY A & PHYLLIS 

3381043000 JACI CARROLL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

3381043000 JACI CARROLL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

3513213380 JACKSON MICHAEL C & PATRICIA M 

0971247710 JACOBS WILLIAM A & CLAIRE 

4771660710 JACOB SON CHARLES E 

0432037350 JACOBSON MARGARET E 

7777115181 JADAIRINC 

4290466000 JAMES ERSKINE & COMPANY INC 

0463025380 JAMES HAROLD & MARY A 

5191101000 JAMES RIVER H INC 

5495726000 JAMMERS CAFE 

0097436000 JAMROGA WALTER 



S WINDSOR CT, SUT 175.97 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 190.96 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 104.36 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 104.36 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 136.65 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 335.68 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 288.33 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 484. 86 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 232.67 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 141.84 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 1 19. 15 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 119.15 

ORANGE CT.CG 134.60 

SHELTON CT, SUT 435.45 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 430. 80 

PLAINVILLE CT, RO 566.3 1 

PLAINVILLE CT, RO 685.43 

PLAINVILLE CT, RO 954.81 

HUNTSVILLE AL, SUT 1 ,796.22 

YALESVILLE CT, CORP 10,971.00 

LAKEVILLE CT, SUT 3,881.86 

HAMDEN CT, CORP 8,656.89 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 129.56 

MILLDALE CT, SUT 264.63 

NORWALK CT, SUT 300.35 

COSCOBCT.CG 523.80 

STAMFORD CT, CG 937.08 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 06.73 

WEST DES MOINES IA, SUT 397.60 

WEST DES MOINES IA, SUT 397.60 

MERTDENCT.CG 160.38 

WALLTNGFORD CT, CG 509.50 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 406. 10 

NORWALK CT, SUT 1 42.08 

MONROE CT, SUT 736.70 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 103.84 

DENVER CO, SUT 112.80 

DENVER CO, SUT 2,906.86 

DENVER CO, SUT 491.25 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 222.25 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 1,038.92 

EAST HARTFORD CT, CORP 9 1 5.60 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 7,698.23 

TRUMBULL CT, SUT 618.24 

VIRGINIA BEACH V A, SUT 1 24.20 

SOUTHINGTON CT, SUT 280.45 

SEYMOUR CT, CG 260.28 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 4,5 14.99 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 5,586.68 
WASHINGTON DEPOT CT, CG 323.76 

ORANGE CT.CG 237.15 

DELRAY BEACH FL, CG 53 1.05 

COVENTRY CT, CG 1 ,572.99 

GROTON CT, IND 607.50 

WALLTNGFORD CT, CORP 368.30 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 563.70 

RICHMOND VA, CORP 830.30 

TORRTNGTON CT, SUT 560.26 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 470.54 



66 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



2591436000 JANET DRESDENS INCREDIBLE EDIBL 

2591436000 JANET DRESDENS INCREDIBLE EDIBL 

0442486620 JASER JASPER J & DOLORES P 

0482873150 JAYNE LUCILLE F 

0664334000 JAYS INC 

5886056000 JDM FITNESS INC 

2923003110 JEFFREY PETER & ESTHER B 

4361788000 JEFFREY SHAW PHOTOGRAPHY 

4873685990 JEKEL JAMES F & JANICE C 

0463683560 JENNINGS MILES P JR & CAROLYN L 

0423066410 JENSEN VILLY F & LISE I 

5341861680 JEPSEN CHARLES H & RITA J 

243461 9670 JESSUP WILLIAM R & CAROLYN M 

0989897000 JETER COOK JEPSON ARCHITECTS 

1342817210 JEWELL NEALM& JOAN M 

3512779000 JOE COMPLETE LAWN SERVICE 

0765073000 JOHN J BRENNAN CONST CO INC 

6394035000 JOHN LAGUZZA ASSOCIATES LTD 

6394035000 JOHN LAGUZZA ASSOCIATES LTD 

453 1 570000 JOHN R GREGORY LUMBER COMPANY 

4898094000 JOHNNY KS AUTO REPAIR INC 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

4832069000 JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 

0471097020 JOHNSON RALPH 

2613045480 JOHNSON ANNE D 

1693426530 JOHNSON BARBARA A 

0451276670 JOHNSON DORIS S 

4402868620 JOHNSON EARL L & PATRICIA A 

0485845760 JOHNSON ERIK A & BEVERLY L 

0810147540 JOHNSON HARRY J & TERESA H 

0441486360 JOHNSON HENRY G 

1212262730 JOHNSON JOHN D & ANNE A 

0543277540 JOHNSON JOHN S & JUDY A 

047093 1 780 JOHNSON JOSEPH H 

0851687930 JOHNSON JOSEPH W & BARBARA M 

1343606990 JOHNSON KATHARINE N 

1812468910 JOHNSON NORMAN C& NANCY W 

0973289790 JOHNSON RICHARD E & CAROLE E 

2644875910 JOHNSON SYLVESTER 

26448759 1 JOHNSON SYLVESTER 

5676202090 JOHNSON WAYNE I & MAUREEN B 

0452415550 JOHNSON YVONNE 

222141 1270 JOHNSTON E RUSSELL JR & RUTH A 

1753635900 JOHNSTON JAMES R & ANN R 

2953435 120 JONES DANIEL S & SUSAN S 

0462417760 JONES DAVID P 

0433246460 JONES GILBERT J & BETSEY 

04220074 1 JONES LAWRENCE & FRANCES 

0475002900 JONES STEVEN H & DIANE R 

0553412000 JOSEPH MERRITT CO INC 

6288773000 JOY ELECTRIC AL COMPANY INC 

5249206000 JUDDS PACKAGE STORE 

2388003020 JULIAN ALEXANDER 



STAMFORD CT, SUT 197.36 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 583. 17 

BETHANY CT, CG 121.33 

STAMFORD CT, CG 592.93 

AVON CT, SUT 146.85 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 770. 12 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 244. 16 

BETHEL CT, SUT 234.18 

N HAVEN CT,CG 133.38 

BRISTOL CT, CG 252.60 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 416.49 

GREENWICH CT, CG 542.22 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 122.88 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 764.73 

STAMFORD CT, CG 165.60 

WOLCOTT CT, SUT 200.03 

SHELTON CT, SUT 1 ,335.63 
CROTON ON HUDSON NY, SUT 21 1.31 
CROTON ON HUDSON NY, SUT 446. 83 

RIDGEFIELD CT, SUT 994.74 

PLAINVILLE CT, SUT 266.42 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 1 03.79 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 109.02 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 254.97 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 1 45.02 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 1 1 8.78 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 169.56 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 106.61 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 107. 15 

HARTFORD CT, CG 133.02 

DARIENCT.CG 144.81 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 52.59 

NAUGATUCK CT, CG 466.06 

SPRING TX.CG 119.29 

DARIENCT.CG 207.60 

MADISON CT, CG 2,2 1 9. 87 

SHELTON CT.CG 220.88 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 237.24 

WILTON CT.CG 1,178.40 

DARIENCT.CG 148.10 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 1 17.00 

NEW LONDON CT, CG 536. 82 

SHELTON CT.CG 119.44 

BRISTOL CT.CG 188.92 

W SIMSBURY CT, CG 123.09 

W SIMSBURY CT, CG 161.05 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 50.47 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 29.40 

STORRS CT, CG 157.09 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 2 1 1 .74 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 561.40 

HARTFORD CT, CG 11 1.68 

WEST SIMSBURY CT, CG 1 60.99 

EAST HARTFORD CT, CG 1 15.99 

WOODBURY CT, CG 500. 10 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 3,606. 10 

QUINCYMA.SUT 401.76 

N BRANFORD CT, SUT 227.55 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 366.87 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



67 



0403459900 JULIANO DAVID W & PATRICIA 

049051 8880 JURCZYK CASIMIR J & MARTHA M 

5236088000 K & J UPHOLSTERY & SUPPLY INC 

6469795000 K & K ADVERTISING INC 

0470383060 KABIANMARYD 

0462640460 KAKUTANI SHTZUO & KEIKO K 

4588468660 KALE BILLY MICHAEL & SUZANN CAR 

0462245540 KALINOWSKI PAUL & NANCY 

4721841720 KALMAN ARNOLD C & DIANA J 

1291414130 KAMTNSKY SHELDON & LAURA 

0434277360 KANE RICHARD P & SUSAN H 

1311498890 KANNER ELLEN R 

0513294110 KAPELMAN GILBERT M & LYN 

0482854820 KAPLAN DENA 

0222614250 KAPLAN MORTON 

0132221850 KAPLAN PHILLIP S & VIVIAN 

7777111996 KARBER EDWARD 

0481672500 KARP BERNARD & ANN 

1 103820170 KARPER LAWRENCE & SUSAN 

0161927000 KASTLS TEXACO 

0422025580 KATTEN FRED & RUTH 

1292615540 KATTLER EUGENE & EVE 

4288890910 KATZERICJ 

0481239310 KAUFMAN ALBERT & LUBA W 

0182458310 KAUFMAN ARTHUR L & RUTH 

2246208890 KAUFMAN DAVID L & ROBIN B 

0604496000 KAUFMAN FUEL COMPANY THE 

0542068760 KAVANAGH THOMAS F 

0773047240 KAYE HOWARD M & ELLYN M 

4279207 190 KAYE WILLIAM S & ELIZABETH R 

0463465360 KAYSER ALAN R ft LAURA 

3168135000 KBI SECURITY SERVICE INC 

3168135000 KBI SECURITY SERVICE INC 

0603008710 KEANE JOHN F & KAREN 

488967 1 000 KE ANES PACKAGE STORE 

2222858900 KEDANLISETTE 

0496040660 KEEGAN THOMAS J JR & PATRICIA L 

0813820370 KEEN CAROL 

0703069010 KEENAN THOMAS M& SHEILA F 

2317923001 KEITHS APPLIANCE 

0443226510 KELLY JOSEPH T JR & MELANIE L 

1283885130 KELLY LAURENCE V ft CAROL L 

5012877000 KELSEYS GARAGE INC 

5012877000 KELSEYS GARAGE INC 

072483 1 000 KEMENT & SON CONSTR INC 

3589066000 KENCO CABLE CONTRACTORS INC 

3684857550 KENDALL CHRISTINE 

1282236580 KENNEDY JOHN R & ELIZABETH C 

1 282236580 KENNEDY JOHN R & ELIZABETH C 

1434264050 KENNEDY PAULA 

0412864250 KENNEDY TODD & ANNE B 

574 1 764000 KENO GRAPHIC SERVICES INC 

442 1 707000 KENSINGTON WELDING & TRAILER CO 

545595 1 000 KENT FOLK INSTRUMENTS 

0693267150 KENT RICHARD E 

6136477000 KENT WINE MERCHANT INC 

0432028590 KERTN WILLIAM J & DOROTHY J 

0613634510 KERMANSHEK JOHN F & JOAN 

5029665000 KERRIGAN PETROLEUM INC 



WALLTNGFORD CT, CG 103.45 

NE WINGTON CT, CG 1 1 8. 00 

GROTONCT.SUT 112.19 

PROVIDENCE RI, SUT 474.79 

NEWTNGTON CT, CG 1 1 0. 1 1 

NORTH HAVEN CT, CG 375. 14 

AUSTIN TX, CG 203.34 

WOLCOTT CT, CG 505.72 

DARTENCT.CG 2,114.07 

WESTON CT.CG 105.92 

LEBANON CT.CG 145.53 

WESTON CT, CG 588.37 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 411.89 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 ,938.70 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 1 ,135.99 

WOODBRJJDGE CT, CG 1 ,005.29 

CHESHIRE CT, IND 495.00 

ESSEX CT.CG 140.40 

HAMDENCT.CG 119.79 

RIDGEFIELD CT, SUT 361.50 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 48.45 

WESTON CT.CG 281.83 

WESTPORT CT, CG 605.45 

BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 1 05. 84 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 36.72 

NEW YORK NY, CG 1 96.56 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 950.24 

GREENWICH CT, CG 296.23 

GREENWICH CT, CG 588.32 

HONG KONG TOWER 4, CG 1 ,099.23 

NORTHFORD CT, CG 1 37. 19 

BRONX NY, SUT 112.92 

BRONX NY, SUT 143.58 

W SIMSBURY CT, CG 260.50 

DANBURY CT, SUT 241.80 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 175.18 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 23 1 .22 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 144.01 

WESTPORT CT, CG 553. 10 

JEWETT CITY CT, SUT 563.96 

DARIEN CT, CG 237.60 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 131.94 

PORTLAND CT, SUT 292.79 

PORTLAND CT, SUT 25 1 .02 

BROAD BROOK CT, SUT 222.00 

ORANGE CT, SUT 111.84 

ATLANTA GA.CG 146.90 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 ,237.74 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 2,913.10 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 295.92 

GREENWICH CT, CG 339.06 

WILTON CT, SUT 967.64 

KENSINGTON CT, SUT 3 1 6.24 

WINSTED CT, SUT 132.79 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 342.45 

KENT CT, SUT 768.00 

NORW ALK CT, CG 1 24.23 

BETHEL CT.CG 121.08 

ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 492.79 



68 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



4884052000 KEY HANDLING SYSTEMS INC 

4884052000 KEY HANDLING SYSTEMS INC 

4884052000 KEY HANDLING SYSTEMS INC 

2553 1 54000 KEYED INPUT SERVICE INC 

2913192000 KEYES FIBRE COMPANY 

5857123000 KEYSTONE ASSOCIATES 

5857123000 KEYSTONE ASSOCIATES 

5857123000 KEYSTONE ASSOCIATES 

5857123000 KEYSTONE ASSOCIATES 

0741202100 KIAMTE MITCHELL 

3573208610 KIEHL CLIFFORD A & MARY ANN 

0443667030 KIL JERRY & BARBARA 

5375053520 KILIAN MICHAEL & CANDEE 

0422207360 KILLION WILLIAM J & JOAN 

1 272495240 KIMBALL DAVID E & DORIS R 

0846675000 KIMBERLY FARMS NURSERY INC 

0846675000 KIMBERLY FARMS NURSERY INC 

0846675000 KIMBERLY FARMS NURSERY INC 

0846675000 KIMBERLY FARMS NURSERY INC 

3721594000 KIMBERLY INN INC 

6284962000 KING ALARM SERVICE & HOUSE CHEC 

1 123202270 KING CHARLES H JR & KARLA B 

1551438430 KING THEODORE O 

0203264030 KINGDALE JAMES R & NINA S 

48 1 6245002 KINKOS COPIES HARTFORD 
48 1 624500 1 KINKOS COPIES NEW HAVEN 

4816245003 KINLOS COPIES OF NEW BRITAIN 
0250976450 KINMONTH MURIEL R 
0422086390 KINSELLA GEORGE B & LINDA R 
4991238000 KIPS INTERNATIONAL SPORT & SKI 
0422432860 KIRALY JAMES 

1453056870 KIRMAYER THOMAS D & PATRICIA 

043 1 277640 KIRSTEN JOHN L & ELIZABETH 

0433605940 KISS GEORGE & IRENE 

2744038490 KISSEL JAMES R & MARIE 

0481832500 KLEIN EDNA M 

0462889410 KLEIN ROBERT & JANICE 

5493035490 KLEINHANS ELIZABETH E 

1163075850 KLIPSTEIN ARNOLD L 

1 82 1 836920 KLOIBER WOODROW G & M A Y H 

1 1 1 2803430 KLUMB EUGENE & NANCY 

1641846580 KNAPP JU ANITA M 

1393638180 KNAPP MARGARET A 

0853047360 KNIAT JOHN & MARTHERITA L 

0853047360 KNIAT JOHN & MARTHERITA L 

3532838780 KNOWLES BRUCE M & MARY I 

4744809920 KNOWLES JAMES B & SUZANNE D 

0181 449030 KNOWLTON PHILLIP M & DOROTHY M 

0873263280 KNUST ACHIM & PAULINE V 

0873263280 KNUST ACHIM & PAULINE V 

7777 1 1 5003 KOCH FRED R 

1313456110 KOEPPEN BARBARA A 

3492806450 KOGAN CHARLES & RUYS CAROLINA 

0664089780 KOHLER SYLVIA 

1543290820 KOHN STEVEN R 

1 543290820 KOHN STEVEN R 

0413299480 KOLETSKY HARRY & ESTHER 

0413299480 KOLETSKY HARRY & ESTHER 

0174246920 KOLOVSON MARK J 



HACKENSACK NJ, SUT 
HACKENSACK NJ, SUT 
HACKENSACK NJ, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
WATERVILLE ME, SUT 
NIANTIC CT, SUT 
NIANTIC CT, SUT 
NIANTIC CT, SUT 
NIANTIC CT, SUT 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
N HAVEN CT, CG 
LEDYARD CT, CG 
BRIDGEWATER CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, SUT 
TRUMBULL CT, SUT 
OLD LYME CT, SUT 
WILTON CT, CG 
QUAKER HILL CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
VENTURA CA, SUT 
VENTURA CA, SUT 
VENTURA CA, SUT 
MYSTIC CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 
MADISON CT.CG 
JOHNSTOWN NY, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
WALLINGFORD CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
MARCO FL, CG 
CROMWELL CT, CG 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, IND 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
COSCOBCT.CG 
DARIEN CT.CG 
GUILFORD CT, CG 
GUILFORD CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 



1,065.30 

1,308.75 
225.12 
432.97 

1,292.96 
336.87 
339.87 
480.75 
314.23 
382.58 
261.80 
648.18 
755.85 
333.94 
118.76 

3,680.21 

1,101.54 
618.08 
525.63 
697.20 
224.17 
125.08 
112.80 

2,283.56 
787.02 
346.% 
142.80 
131.10 
542.90 
432.05 
180.51 
228.45 
128.30 
203.34 
153.22 

1,806.00 
518.01 
554.27 
177.21 
203.20 
172.09 
119.52 
307.60 
118.21 
152.91 
213.70 

3,123.80 
112.20 
353.21 
353.21 
182.67 
130.45 
455.35 
108.41 
210.94 
747.30 
169.90 
169.90 
102.56 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



69 



6487482000 KONICKI ASSOCIATES INC 

0463884110 KONOVER ANNA 

1250925420 KOOPMAN GEORGETTE 

1013666670 KOPF GARY S & HEDDA R 

045 1 677530 KORDER WALTER OR& LOUISE W 

524705 1 000 KOSHER CELEBRATIONS INC 

1073069010 KOVAK STANLEY & ELLEN 

0442494950 KOWASLKYPAUL 

6253470000 KRAFT FOODSERVICE INC 

6253470000 KRAFT FOODSERVICE INC 

0553925000 KRALL COAL & OIL COMPANY INC TH 

0472814420 KRALL GEOGE & SUSAN 

0873693840 KRAMER HANS B & CHRISTA 

0432820230 KRAMER SHERMAN & SARA 

0472067040 KRANTZ MILTON K & BERNICE 

1593063520 KRAUSE KATHERTNE C 

0412866220 KRAUSS RUTH 

200 1 87 1 840 KRA VITZ SAMUEL & FREID A 

1 1007943 1 KRA YESKI BERNARD & ANITA 

04628979 1 KRETZMER RICHARD S & ARDR A T 

0471406550 KREVOLIN MILTON & JUDITH 

1 893092270 KROLL ALEX S & PH YLUS B 

0494081930 KRUGM AN ARNOLD 

0494081930 KRUGM AN ARNOLD 

0481219160 KRUH ALLEN L & MYRNA 

0492822350 KRUSINSKY EMU W & NANCY A 

1 01 4096080 KUEHN JUERGEN & ZACHARIE JOAN D 

3 1 83635200 KUHNERT DAVID &JANET 

4686770000 KULLAS POST LTD 

9990 1 02240 KULLMAN CHARLES EST OF 

0482608200 KUNOFSKY HOWARD & MIRIAM 

099221 3420 KUPPER GEORGE W & LORRRAINE A 

089 1 683290 KURISH ANTHONY & ELEANOR 

0410303040 KURZAWA WALTER 

9990103 140 KUTZMA OLIVE H EST OF 

0443480590 KUZMICKAS WALTER A & SUSANNE C 

1524607990 KYRTATAS SOCRATES & FILLIA 

3715224000 L & L EXECUTIVE CLEANING SERVIC 

4564985000 L C P GRAPHIC DESIGNS 

4564985000 L C P GRAPHIC DESIGNS 

4564985000 L C P GRAPHIC DESIGNS 

1941672250 LABARJEANC 

0090743630 LABELLE JOHN D & CLAIRE L 

0431415180 LABENSKI PETER E & FRANCES T 

0463679620 LACEYJOHNB 

5789436290 LACHMAN ANTHONY & MARGARET 

7777103935 LACHNICKI JOHN 

0483607860 LACKMAN ALBERT H 

0473834740 LACKMAN SADYLE 

447601 6000 LADY DIS CATERING 

0433840960 LAERI BETTY C 

1 192248940 LAFLIN JOHN C & JOSEPHINE B 

0361293220 LAFRAMBOISE FRANCIS & PAULINE 

5800254630 LAGUS MICHAEL A & CAROL A 

002 1 698470 LALLIER NAPOLEON & THERESA 

0594309000 LAND N SEA SEPARATES INC 

5958939000 LANDSCAPE DESIGN 

3575974000 LANDSCAPE STRUCTURES INC 

0843627000 LANE DOROTHY K 



CHEPACHET RI, CORP 146.00 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 ,790.40 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 ,954.68 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 1 49. 82 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 135. 89 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 426.90 

WILTON CT, CG 224.28 

GREENS FARMS CT, CG 1 ,085. 84 

GLENVIEW IL, SUT 1 ,060.64 

GLENVIEW IL, SUT 1 , 1 62.09 

NEW HAVEN CT, GE 254. 86 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 704. 13 

STAMFORD CT, CG 151.59 

ORANGE CT, CG 469.41 

ORANGE CT.CG 126.77 

FARMTNGTON CT, CG 370.44 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 20.24 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 1 2.40 

GREENWICH CT, CG 205.65 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 140.86 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 587.90 

W REDDING CT, CG 1,367.50 

OLD S A YBROOK CT, CG 1 66.37 

OLD SA YBROOK CT, CG 1 17. 12 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 340.20 

STRATFORD CT, CG 160.93 

REDDING CT.CG 601.80 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 102.50 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 4,545.00 

MADISON CT, FID 725.98 

WATERBURY CT, CG 138.57 

SHERMAN CT.CG 115.52 

AVON CT, CG 102.33 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 274. 17 

NEW BRITAIN CT, FID 192.88 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 126.30 

BETHANY CT, CG 122.91 

FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 126. 10 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 222.91 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 120.33 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 224.99 

BRISTOL CT.CG 301.68 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 1 86.37 

NORWICH CT,CG 519.93 

SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 723.81 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 128.78 

TERRYVILLE CT, IND 123. 19 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 905.49 

HAMDENCT.CG 127.96 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 217.37 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 196.00 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 200. 87 
NO GROSVENORD ALE CT, CG 1 88. 80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 23.69 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 1 17.06 

D ARIEN CT, CORP 1 56.40 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 1 05.97 

DELANO MN, SUT 704.25 

ORANGE CT.CG 148.82 



70 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



2255095300 
0414863780 
0444446120 
2993603280 
0491656780 
2275416540 
2555571000 
3864466720 
1023033250 
0972476550 
0754491650 
0073270390 
0073270390 
0591172000 
0962825000 
0982653680 
0414214150 
0441664360 
5466180000 
5221007840 
4376091000 
5626070060 
0492630580 
0493851240 
0172429180 
1792490510 
0032413330 
2875259060 
0494249050 
0494249050 
0452486150 
5394067750 
0543693060 
2296770000 
0403888530 
0593256120 
0471651420 
0413474360 
0604051130 
0402072890 
0212672140 
0263651180 
0053878760 
6085070000 
1182881800 
0443851720 
7777114711 
4983831600 
0152479960 
0433810380 
0666088930 
4595832990 
0433813480 
0433813480 
0923886010 
0403478380 
0412076920 
0620372740 
1073044640 



LANE PEGGY O 

LANE THOMAS W 

LANNI LUIGI & CONCETTA 

LAPINE LAWRENCE M & SUSAN L 

LAPOLLA JOHN & KATHLEEN 

LAPRADE CARTER & SUZANNE 

LAS AMERICAS MARKET 

LASH JAMES A & S JONES S DEBORA 

LASHER HOWARD 

LATORRE MICHAEL & THELMA 

LAUGHTON RICHARD V & BARBARA A NEW CANAAN CT, CG 

LAUTERSTEIN HENRY W & KATHERINENEW YORK NY, CG 

LAUTERSTEIN HENRY W & KATHERINENEW YORK NY, CG 

LAVERYS STRATFORD AVE GRILL INC STRATFORD CT, SUT 



GREENWICH CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
MADISON CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
NEWTOWN CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 



LAWRENCE ALBERT E & VIRGINIA P 
LAYDEN DONALD W & BARBARA 
LAZINGER SAMUEL J & LINDA 
LEACH EUGENE F & HELEN 
LEADER MARKETING COMPANY 
LEAR ROBERT W & DOROTHY S 
LEASE MART 

LEBEDEFF SERGEJ & JEAN K 
LEBEL RAYMOND L & BEATRICE E 



NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
ALPHARETTA GA, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
HOUSTON TX, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, CG 
COVENTRY CT, CG 



LEBOV GEORGE & FARNELL CANDACE N BRANFORD CT, CG 



LEBOWITZ WALLACE B 

LECK PAUL & MARY SP 

LECLERC ROLAND L 

LEE HEEJON & JONG IM 

LEFEBER PETER J & CATHERINE M 

LEFEBER PETER J & CATHERINE M 

LEGER ROSANNE 

LEIENDECKER GILLBERT L JR & SAL 

LEON JOEL M & PHYLLIS A 

LEONARD W LOHNE INCORPORATED 

LERMANMAXINE 

LERNER JEFFREY P & JANE L 

LESSER ROBERT K & LOIS H 

LESSNER JOSIAH J & EMILY M 

LESTER RODNEY S & ANNETTE 

LEVENTHAL IRWIN & RITA 

LE VENTHAL MARVIN R & JEANNETTE 

LEVERONE LOUIS T & MARCIA 

LEVESQUE ROGER & EMILY 

LEVI STRAUSS & CO 

LEVINE BARTON & SUZANNE 

LEVINE DAVID S & DIANE 

LEVINE IRVING 

LEVINE RONALD & ELAINE 

LEVTTAN RALPH H & GLORIA G 

LEWIS ARNOLD J & NAVA 

LEWIS CAROLE E & TREADWELL M 

LEWIS PERRY J & MEMRIE M 

LEWIS SETH M & MINNA K 

LEWIS SETH M & MINNA K 

LI JAMES & ELIZABETH 

LIB BY HARRY & JOAN 

UCHTENFELS WILLIAM C & EILEEN 

LIEBERT HERMAN W & LAURA P 

LIEBOWITZ GILDA 



FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 
EASTON CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CORP 
TAMARA FL, CG 
NORWALK CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
OLD LYME CT, CG 
WOLCOTT CT, CG 
SAN FRANCISCO CA, CORP 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
CHESHIRE CT, CG 
DANBURYCT.IND 
DANBURYCT.CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
SHELTON CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
PROSPECT CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT. CG 



284.80 
177.63 
198.44 
102.72 
160.40 
682.78 
542.18 
21,756.00 
248.20 
700.29 
210.24 
322.92 
230.09 
156.41 
477.42 
893.74 
120.56 
304.36 

,,023.20 
343.80 

2,493.50 
134.82 
107.24 
157.36 
772.65 
709.00 
158.56 
115.88 
245.06 
245.96 
502.10 

1,155.38 
203.13 
399.10 
226.08 
317.31 

1,531.84 
271.52 
524.40 
106.16 
411.66 
148.99 
198.91 

7,719.60 
563.90 
204.03 
381.62 
575.90 
696.69 
245.66 
118.43 

6,359.14 
264.44 
263.44 

1,326.31 
161.23 

1,544.37 
119.00 
160.71 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



71 



1573839000 
1573839000 
1090173350 
4936670000 
2376858600 
5048129000 
0483207000 
0471602220 
0403630020 
0371465960 
3563034120 
6055248000 
5568373000 
0142263350 
4682696000 
1643210770 
2337265560 
2152038450 
1333867480 
3875788000 
0442836480 
0413694380 
0413694380 
2610149060 
1261060620 
9990102920 
9990102920 
0463825280 
0460728120 
3942608400 
1113401930 
1301214760 
0483090660 
0411050340 
2152207510 
5934674000 
5336060000 
1462817690 
0463081670 
0415821420 
0432886620 
0601247460 
1494489720 
0435644800 
2474890410 
1712263840 
0480197660 
0453036260 
0104452460 
6281679000 
0462859460 
6395024000 
1073833720 
1073833720 
0463475030 
0452418400 
1902693050 
0413026310 
0420718160 



LIEBOWITZ LAURENCE B & CONSTANC RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
IJEBOWITZ LAURENCE B & CONSTANC RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 



LIGHT ENOCH EST OF 

LILRAVOCK TRENNIS CLUB INC 

LIND LINDA 

LTNDELL FUELS INC 

LTNDQUIST KENNETH & IRENE 

LIPKVICH ALFRED & ANN 

LTTOFF LOUIS & ROSE 

LTTTELL NELSON JR & RUTH L 

LITTLE HENRI B 

LITTLE HOUSE SPECIALITY STRUCTU 

LITTLE RIVER POWER EQUIPMENT IN 

LITTLEFIELD HERRICK B & CAROLE 

LTTTMAN JEWELERS 72 

LTVEZEY JOHN P & MARY H 

LOCKE BARBARA B 

LOESBERG JR ALAN S 

LOH LOUIS S & MAY HWA CHEN 

LONG RIDGE SERVICE INC 

LONGO AMERICO & ANTOINETTE 

LOOMIS RALPH & MARYLYNN 

LOOMIS RALPH & MARYLYNN 

LOOP DAMON R & BETTY E 

LORD BENJAMIN JR & BARBARA 

LORD DORIS EST OF 

LORD DORIS EST OF 

LORD RUTH 

LORENTZON ARTHUR L 

LORENZ EDWARD L & MARJORIE J 

LOTHSTEIN LESLIE & MARY A 

LOVE AUDREY B 

LOVEJOY THOMAS B 

LOVELL HAROLD C JR & LULU K 

LOWENCARD JEROME H & ELAINE T 

LOWER CONNECTICUT RIVER M L S I 

LUBE 10 INC 

LUBETKIN ARVIN I & ROCHELLE H 

LUCAS JAMES M & LESLIE B 

LUCAS KAREN 

LUCKE ARTHUR R & DIANE JR 

LUDLAM LILLIAN 

LUDWIG URSULA 

LUFF VALERIE A & KATHRYN 

LUFTGLAS ROMAN & GERTRUDE 

LUKENS LEWIS N & ELLEN W 

LUNTN ARTHUR A & GLADYS J 

LUPINACCH DAWN 

LUTERMAN GERALD 

LUTYNSKI MICHAEL 

LUTZ WILLIAM & IRI 

LUZAK I 

LYNCH DORSEY H & LYN C 

LYNCH DORSEY H & LYN C 

LYNCH MARY 

LYNCH THOMAS F & LINDA 

LYNN THEODORE & JOCELYN 

LYONS MICHAEL J & EMILY C 

LYONS WILLIAM L JR & EVELYN A 



BRIDGEPORT CT, FTD 
LITCHFIELD CT, CORP 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
CANAAN CT, GAS 
EASTON CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
DALLAS TX, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
REDDING RIDGE CT, CG 
VERNON CT, SUT 
BEACON FALLS CT, SUT 
DARIEN CT, CG 
EDISON NJ, SUT 
W REDDING CT, CG 
ESSEX CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
NEW FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
WATERBURY CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
NORWICH CT, CG 
FARMTNGTON CT, FID 
FARMINGTON CT, FID 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
SOUTHBURY CT, CG 
LEDYARD CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
KEY BISCAYNE FL, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 
NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 
MANSFIELD CENTER CT, CG 
HARWINTON CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
MTLFORD CT, CG 
NEW HARTFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
HIGGANUM CT, CG 
BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
MILLDALE CT, SUT 
BETHEL CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT.CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
MERIDENCT,CG 



407.20 
407.20 
445.53 
205.60 
313.38 
117.53 
176.22 
204.20 

1,349.29 
102.40 
418.37 
328.22 

1,174.59 

1,856.40 
780.55 
106.04 
161.41 
231.26 
129.05 
468.79 
198.27 
148.15 
317.94 
258.64 
124.09 

3,019.42 
298.81 

8,744.60 
716.34 
128.32 
266.39 

2,717.32 
397.17 
136.50 
169.59 
467.54 
196.93 
176.90 
265.15 
211.60 
176.64 
243.38 
246.51 
403.29 
372.78 
293.46 

1,281.46 
167.98 
595.57 
323.89 
214.40 
122.22 

1,847.07 
405.09 
187.80 
739.17 
241.33 

1,628.43 
116.06 



72 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



6354377000 M & I DATA SERVICES INC 

5287446000 M A INCORPORATED 

5287446000 M A INCORPORATED 

5287446000 M A INCORPORATED 

5 150339000 M ARTHUR GENSLER JR & ASSOCIATE 

2656775000 M T M CORPORATION 

705 1 803670 MACAULEY ARTHUR P & LENORE P 

0422464400 MACDERMID JOHN T & MARIE 

0422464400 MACDERMID JOHN T & MARIE 

6289284000 MACDONALD BONNIE L 

0421097160 MACIEJKA WALTER & IRENE 

1762272840 MACK GEORGE S & OLGA L 

2475382000 MACKENZIE LANDSCAPING 

3467123000 MACKEYS 

0860158340 MACKLER ISADORE M & FLORENCE J 

7777 1 1 5943 M ACLELLAN ELIZABETH 

0383619340 MACLEOD KIPP 

0593676100 MACSHANE DONALD S & NANCY L 

5819453000 MAD HATTER MUFFLER & BRAKE CEN 

0472850270 MAFFE FRANCIS A JR & JOAN C 

1634639320 MAFFEI MARIO F & NATALIA C 

261643 1 100 MAGIDA STEPHEN A & BEVERLY 

1352491120 MAGUIRE CAROL 

1563435020 MAHER STEPHEN & SUSAN G 

5447776000 MAHONEY CYNTHIA C 

025361 8640 MAHONEY ELEANOR W 

0460989670 MAHONEY JAMES D & VIOLA N 

0484280580 MAILLY JOHN M & JOANNA J 

351 7745000 MAIN HEATING & COOLING ENTERPRI 

4857835000 MAIN HEATING & COOLING SERVICE 

4857835000 MAIN HEATING & COOLING SERVICE 

2950400000 MAIN PORT FISH N CHIPS 

0465019540 MAINVILLE JACK D & CAROLINE 

5267801520 MAISEL MICHAEL & ARLETTE 

5049168000 MAISON LE BLANC 

4906483860 MAKLAD MOKHTAR S & SAMIRA M 

0423068770 MALINO JEROME R & RHODA K 

5138342000 MALL VIEW CINEMA 

0484265350 MALLEY EDWARD 

1162043640 MANACHER ZELDA 

0481610110 MANAGER THOMAS G& PEARL T 

438 1 000000 M ANEELEYS CATERING INC 

047 1 403000 M ANGEN ARNOLD & MILDRED 

0614545000 MANGER ELECTRIC CO INC 

0471223390 MANN EDNA 

1 03248 1 640 MANN FREDERICK I & K ATHERINE M 

0402675400 MANNING FRANCIS A & SANDRA W 

7777114964 MANNING SAMUEL K 

1152467690 MANNTX JOHN F & HELEN S 

0483875300 MANSFIELD ELIZABETH P 

090461 5000 MANUFACTURERS HANOVER LEASING 

0724669270 MANZI ANTHONY 

0412651 120 MANZI JOSEPH & ANN 

045 1 609850 MANZI VINCENT E & MARY 

7777 1 1 29 1 2 MARASCO PETER A & CATHERINE & L 

0722668530 MARBAN ENRIQUE G & MARGARET B 

0790998000 MARC ANTONY S CAFE INC 

0433290270 MARCHESE ANTHONY J & CROLE N 

5140595000 MARCONE ENTERPRISES INC 



MILWAUKEE WI, SUT 2,513.31 

DANBUR Y CT, SUT 464. 88 

DANBURY CT, SUT 695.04 

DANBUR Y CT, SUT 59 1 .25 

SAN FRANCISCO CA, SUT 1 ,927.46 

ANDOVER CT, SUT 1 1 8.95 

HAMDENCT.CG 150.98 

PLYMOUTH CT, CG 193.70 

PLYMOUTH CT, CG 232.23 

NEW CANAAN CT, SUT 141.00 

JEWETT CITY CT, CG 272.90 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,395. 16 

NEW CANAAN CT, SUT 205.52 

BROOKFIELD CT, SUT 392.45 

STAMFORD CT, CG 705.33 

SANDY HOOK CT, IND 222.00 

PROVIDENCE RI, CG 487. 1 1 

WESTPORT CT, CG 346.64 

MILFORD CT, SUT 744.55 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 1 10.69 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,281.67 

STAMFORD CT, CG 111.17 

MADISON CT.CG 135.40 

GREENWICH CT, CG 494.34 

MIDDLETOWN CT, SUT 160.65 

WESTON CT, CG 327.50 

TALCOTTVILLE CT, CG 141.61 

WOLCOTTCT.CG 101.66 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 810.15 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 581.26 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 498.45 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 447.55 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 137.40 

STAMFORD CT, CG 214.46 

NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 422.93 

WOODBURY MN, CG 1 87.68 

DANBURY CT, CG 137.93 

BOSTON MA, SUT 4,812.08 

GREENWICH CT, CG 109.52 

GREENWICH CT, CG 997.38 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 536.60 

S WINDSOR CT, SUT 246.72 

WALLINGFORD CT, CG 2,234.29 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 17,610.00 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 311.13 

EASTONCT.CG 186.85 

SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 1 02.62 

W HAVEN CT, IND 148.13 

WILTON CT.CG 1,281.87 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 297.55 

LIVINGSTON NJ, SUT 1 28.77 

WILTON CT.CG 154.47 

WESTPORT CT, CG 242.27 

NORWALK CT, CG 130.87 

NEW FAIRFIELD CT, IND 1 24.00 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 1 1 3.30 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 1,016.67 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 61 9.38 

MIDDLEBURY CT, SUT 299.03 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



73 



0440973970 MARCUS JACK & PEARL 

0721403500 MARCUS RUTH B 

0463232510 MARESCA FRANK J & LINDA F 

0423416140 MARESCA JACK & PATRIA 

4943775000 MARGOTS FLOWERS & GIFTS 

6078422000 MARIO R VERGARA ARCHITECT P C 

5797733000 MARIO THE BAKERS II 

4254140000 MARJ AM SUPPLY CO INC 

1322221270 MARKINSON MARTIN & ARLENE 

0830597570 MARKOSKY FRANK & MARY 

0481012390 MARKOWSKI STANISLAWA 

6178370000 MARKS RESTAURANT 

0433896330 MARSH FLORA 

046461 8450 MARSH HOWARD D & HELEN J 

0594770000 MARSH MOTORS CORP 

0754263040 MARSHALL ERIC & NANCE 

1 88261 3 170 M ARSICANO NICHOLAS & ELIZABETH 

0480163320 MARSILLIO CHARLES & ANGELA 

4753824090 MARTI MICHAEL F & USA G 

3905823730 MARTIN GEOFFREY K & TOVAH 

057920 1 000 MARTIN J KELLY INC THE 

1853251210 MARTIN JOHN F & FRANCISCA C 

005384 1 070 MARTIN NORMAN R & JEANNETTE U 

0475028240 MARVIN MICHAEL A & MAUREEN 

4976346000 MARY&AILIS 

0480377850 MASCOLO ANTHONY J & ANNE T 

0738542014 MASCOT PETROLEUM 

0738542014 MASCOT PETROLEUM 

0462456480 MASE CARMELO & LUCILLE 

03 1 3222860 MASON PAUL G & ELLEN G 

0461611910 MASON VERNON G 

0442217940 MASSEY ALAN & HINDA 

5417704000 MASTER ENGRAVEING & PRINTERY 

349392 1 000 MASTER SYSTEMS INC 

4433656150 MASTERSON TRENTON D & MYRNA S 

0591471350 MATERNE WILLIAM M & VALERIE J 

09 1 1 687430 M ATHEWSON FREDERICK & MARILYN 

0434834680 MATHIEU DONALD E & ANNE K 

0995308000 MATLACKINC 

0453492600 MATSON JOHN E & SARAH S 

0492820060 MATTA MICHAEL G & ELAINE 

079 1 590000 M ATTATUCK INDUSTRIAL SCRAP MET 

0434088580 MATTEI ERNEST J & MICHELE M 

0450132780 MATTEI MARIE 

0402893400 MATTERN ROBERT B & JOAN A 

0352098520 MATTESON ROBERT W & CAROLYN V 

0352098520 MATTESON ROBERT W & CAROLYN V 

0352098520 MATTESON ROBERT W & CAROLYN V 

0492416720 MATTO RALPH J & ELAINE 

0403412300 MATURO FRANK C & JEANNE 

3573078130 MAUER LAURENCE & KAREN 

0470795950 MAUGERI CAMILLO P & NANCY R 

7777112417 MAUM ROBERT D 

5132923000 MAX BIB OS INC 

0082067270 MAY HARRY R & BARBARA B 

0453288700 MAYERS PAUL H & KERWIN 

0453288700 MAYERS PAUL H & KERWIN 

0692269000 MAYFLOWER KENWORTH INC 

059 1 260890 MAYS WHITEFORD S & HARRIET M 



DANBURYCT.CG 851.60 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 1 ,729.30 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 200.60 

E ASTON CT, CG 105.22 

PROSPECT CT, SUT 491.55 

GARDEN CITY NY, SUT 127.08 

ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 686.87 

BROOKLYN NY, SUT 4,974.64 

NEW YORK NY, CG 880. 10 

NEWTOWN CT, CG 1 13.42 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 288.99 

S GLASTONBURY CT, SUT 399.32 

EASTONCT.CG 314.71 

GREENWICH CT, CG 594.98 

HAMDEN CT, SUT 5,169.61 

STAMFORD CT, CG 132.51 

NEW MILFORD CT, CG 104.44 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 181.15 

HARTFORD CT, CG 292. 87 

DANIELSON CT, CG 173.88 

CHESHIRE CT, SUT 794.95 

WESTPORT CT, CG 192.43 

BRISTOL CT.CG 314.76 

COLCHESTER CT, CG 11 8.72 

AMSTON CT, SUT 476.09 

AVONCT.CG 319.67 

PHILADELPHIA PA, SUT 261.45 

PHILADELPHIA PA, SUT 434.81 

NEW FAIRFIELD CT, CG 261.50 

WESTON CT.CG 127.85 

LEBANON CT, CG 497.92 

HAMDEN CT.CG 167.67 

NAUGATUCK CT, SUT 321.46 

WINDSOR LOCKS CT, CORP 378.01 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 159.58 

WASHINGTON DEPOT CT, CG 393.94 

SIMSBURY CT, CG 100.04 

EHADDAMCT.CG 176.90 

WILMINGTON DE, CORP 199.20 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 147.66 

SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 155.58 

WOLCOTT CT, CORP 653.40 

WINDSOR CT.CG 151.97 

WINDSOR CT.CG 251.48 

STRATFORD CT, CG 139.74 

PUTNAM CT,CG 152.83 

PUTNAM CT.CG 152.83 

PUTNAM CT.CG 152.83 

SHELTON CT, CG 502.36 

BRANFORD CT, CG 217.60 

WILTON CT, CG 170.84 

MILFORD CT, CG 133.95 

GREENWICH CT, IND 771.60 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 257.71 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 105. 16 

ROWAYTON CT, CG 616.55 

ROWAYTON CT, CG 616.56 

MILFORD CT, SUT 2,5 1 6. 8 1 

GREENS FARMS CT, CG 141.99 



74 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0644821010 MAZZILII LEE L & DANIELLE L 

0644821010 MAZZILLI LEE L & DANIELLE L 

0492278690 MAZZOTTA SALVATORE A & KATHLE 

0420363220 MAZZUCCHI R THOMAS & ELIZABETH 

1 9 1 1 807560 MCCARTHY FRANCIS J & RITA D 

1 952062430 MCCARTY CLIFFORD E & FLORENCE P 

46968 1 5930 MCCARY DAVID W & TINA H 

193263 1660 MCCOLOUGH PETER & VIRGINIA W 

0453865420 MCCOURT ELIZABETH R 

0608489000 MCCRORY CORPORATION 

7251080660 MCCURDY WILLIAM R 

0910951350 MCDANNELLUCYC 

0482876500 MCDERMOTT DAVID M & SALLY M 

0482876500 MCDERMOTT DAVID M & SALLY M 

0563609020 MCDERMOTT RICHARD G JR & LAURA 

3701691350 MCDONALD QUENTIN & ANNETTE 

048 1 466 1 00 MCDONALD ROBERT A & CAROL 

0482485710 MCGANN RICHARD F & NORMA I 

0433603920 MCGILL SUSAN M 

0444602580 MCGOWAN TERENCE E & BARBARA 

0700898000 MCGRATH DAVIS INC 

0432029970 MCINERNEY JAMES M & HELEN K 

0143416360 MCKERR RICHARD O & MARSHA B 

4073334000 MCKINLAY AND PARTNERS INC 

3984451730 MCKINLEY ELLEN B 

57 1 6862440 MCKINNELL HENRY A & GURI 

1441227770 MCLAREN HARRY H & JANE 

0670573 890 MCLAUGHLIN M ARJORIE G 

0550931610 MCLEOD ROSS 

0453492340 MCLOUGHLIN THOMAS G & NANCY B 

0993497780 MCMAHON JOHN W & CHERYL J 

4130387010 MCMAHON THOMAS E & SARAH A 

0490182020 MCMURRAY WILLIAM & JUNE W 

042 1 4685 1 MCNAM ARA ARTHUR & MARION 

1 3 1 2048520 MCNAM ARA DANIEL J & PATRICIA M 

0944086820 MCNAMARA WILLIAM D 

2236478910 MCNEELA SALLY L & PATRICK J 

4135810000 MCNEIECE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 

072 1 828070 MCQU ADE FR ANCIS X & MARY F 

1651212550 MCVEIGH THOMAS P & MARGARET S 

6491195000 MDI SYSTEMS INC 

0441451 120 MEADE JAMES G & FRANCES R 

4904314000 MEC A SOFTWARE INC 

5559307000 MECHANICAL CONSTRUCTION CORP 

3013019230 MECUM DUDLEY C & HARRIET Z 

1 105279850 MEHTA SHEFALI S 

087 1 6025 1 MEISTER ALTON & LEONORA 

2825444890 MELC HER CYNTHIA 

0265283770 MELLBERG ROBERT E & MICHELLE A 

0430994620 MENCUCCTNI LAWRENCE ft BARBARA 

4925 145000 MENDELSON GALLERY INC 

5796180000 MENS AH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENS AH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENS AH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENSAH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENSAH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENS AH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENSAH FAMILY INC 

5796180000 MENSAH FAMILY INC 



SAN DIEGO CA, CG 1 96.60 

SAN DIEGO CA, CG 1 96.60 

MJDDLETOWN CT, CG 1 36.64 

CANTON CTR CT, CG 489.62 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 463.58 

BROOKFIELD CT, CG 3 1 3.60 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 26 1 .62 

LAKE WORTH FL, CG 443. 1 1 

WATERFORD CT, CG 331.19 

YORK PA, CORP 196.10 

HARTFORD CT, CG 355. 16 

HARTFORD CT, CG 1 88.37 

DEEP RIVER CT, CG 1 ,346.35 

DEEP RIVER CT, CG 1 ,346.35 

GREENWICH CT.CG 395.12 

WASHINGTON CT, CG 8 1 2.00 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 297.54 

GROTONCT.CG 313.05 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 301.60 

SIMSBURY CT, CG 200.09 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 242. 12 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 357.53 

MANCHESTER MA, CG 492. 10 

SIMSBURY CT, BU 2,355. 17 

PRINCETON NJ, CG 133.90 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 05. 1 8 

EHADDAMCT.CG 512.54 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 136.56 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 80.30 

MYSTIC CT.CG 271.96 

BRANFORD CT, CG 220.26 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 26. 10 

BERLIN CT.CG 103.30 

HAMDENCT.CG 1,060.91 

GREENWICH CT, CG 547.65 

COS COB CT, CG 207.65 

HONG KONG, CG 293.10 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 669.78 

DARIEN CT, CG 797.60 

SOKENTCT.CG 1,092.11 

SCHAUMBURG IL, SUT 676.47 

NEWTNGTON CT, CG 130.98 

FAIRFIELD CT, CORP 9,223.05 

POUGHKEEPSIE NY, SUT 14,288.85 

GREENWICH CT, CG 330.46 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 49. 1 1 

WOODBURY CT, CG 381.26 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 623.42 

SOMERSCT.CG 357.17 

TORRINGTON CT, CG 245.94 
WASHINGTON DEPOT CT, SUT 128.31 

GROTON CT, SUT 373.48 

GROTON CT, SUT 372.77 

GROTON CT, SUT 350.27 

GROTON CT, SUT 343.12 

GROTON CT, SUT 334.28 

GROTON CT, SUT 385.58 

GROTON CT, SUT 353.83 

GROTON CT, SUT 367.36 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



75 



0451260490 MERCHANT DOROTHY C 

7777 103944 MERCUGLIANO LAWRENCE J JR 

0423489940 MERENSKI JAMES H & DONNA M 

0433659310 MERENSKI MICHAEL & BEVERLY A 

5142822210 MERUANIAN ASPET & LUCILLE 

0572867000 MERIT OIL OF CONNECTICUT INC 

0490362610 MERLO MILDRED 

4533618000 MERQUIP 

4533618000 MERQUIP 

0444043280 MERRIAM ALLAN E 

3804876560 MERSZEI ZOLTAN & ATMEE M 

1 244602290 MESEH A GEORGE & NADIA 

1032491500 MESITE GEORGE & ROSALIE 

05324743 1 MESSINGER HENRY J & BEATRICE K 

0802614850 METCHICK ROBERT H & CAROL B 

6066203000 METHODS MACHINE TOOLS INC 

0571801390 MEYER HERBERT M & MARGERY 

3350141110 MEYER JOHN H & MILDRED A 

0473250800 MEYER PRITCHARD H & JACKLYN 

0443044890 MICACCI ANTHONY Z & LUCILLE 

1019967000 MICHAEL J KEATING AGENCY INC 

3 195708000 MICHAEL LABRIOLA INC 

6328082000 MICHAEL P MCGUIRE & ASSOCIATES 

5993126000 MICHAELS FLOWERS LTD 

0961640630 MICHAELSEN EDWARD H & FRTTZE 

045 1 697450 MICHALAK CHESTER J & JANE 

042 1 828670 MICH ALSKI MICHAEL F & BERNICE J 

0475279500 MICHAUD MARK D & LOUISE B 

0208660002 MICROWAVE CLINIC 

54573 1 2000 MIDDLE STREET PACKAGE STORE 

1098672000 MIDDLESEX MUTUAL ASSURANCE CO 

3938230001 MIDDLETOWN GETTY 

3938230001 MIDDLETOWN GETTY 

3938230001 MIDDLETOWN GETTY 

1 107549000 MIDLANTIC COMMERCIAL LEASING 

2809408000 MIKES AUTO CLINIC INC 

6302632000 MIKES COUNTRY MARKET 

06673 1 1 000 MIKOSZ N AGEL TV INC 

0646786000 MILL HOUSE INC 

4496535000 MILLBROOK GOLF COURSE 

5784496040 MILLER ALVIN & ELSIE 

0400364490 MILLER CHRISTIAN J 

1 562003780 MILLER DA VTD H & MARGARET C 

1582245360 MILLER DONALD F JR 

2704897740 MILLER DOUGLAS E & ELEANOR G 

2365889690 MILLER JAMES A JR & SHELBY J 

1083001930 MILLER JOSEPH H & BARBARA A 

0402451000 MILLER PAUL H 

1 803605520 MILLER PHILIP N & VAUGHN 

0434021500 MILLER SOPHIE 

0174226790 MILLEY ALEXANDER M & LINDA E 

3762669150 MILLMAN WILLIAM & PATRICIA 

0433801830 MILLS DOROTHY O 

1531030100 MILLS SARAH A 

0423077610 MILLUZZO JOSEPH & ALICE 

0442845 1 00 MUX) ANTHONY M & ELIZABETH C 

0491619160 MILVAE THOMAS C 

0452877570 MINCH ROBERT & MARLENE 

1 232829530 MINKOWTTZ SHELDON & NORMA 



GREENWICH CT, CG 3 ,086. 84 

HAMDEN CT, IND 167.35 

COSCOBCT.CG 146.60 

COSCOBCT.CG 147.00 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 105.16 

LINDEN NJ, SUT 6,276.53 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 1 ,395.47 

MERIDEN CT, SUT 1 85. 83 

MERIDEN CT, SUT 107.91 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 181.08 

GREENWICH CT, CG 769.51 

SALEM CT, CG 627.65 

MERIDEN CT, CG 1 ,464.74 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 1 13.84 

WESTPORT CT, CG 254.51 

SUDBURY MA.SUT 4,590.04 

STAMFORD CT, CG 201.67 

MADISON CT, CG 176.73 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 1 82.77 

KENSINGTON CT, CG 395. 13 

W HARTFORD CT, CORP 375.07 

ARMONK NY, SUT 532.24 

DANBURYCT.SUT 120.00 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 198.35 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 2,408.40 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 11 8.97 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 27. 89 

BRISTOL CT, CG 274.30 

NEWINGTON CT, SUT 244.77 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 115.21 

MIDDLETOWN CT, SUT 704.23 

EAST HAVEN CT, SUT 290.90 

EAST HAVEN CT, SUT 238.97 

EAST HAVEN CT, SUT 253. 86 

NEW YORK NY, BU 6,330.90 

HAMDEN CT, SUT 150.10 

BOLTON CT, SUT 368.76 

PLANTS VILLE CT, SUT 296. 18 

WOODBURY CT, CORP 983.99 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 201.48 

BLOOMFT£LDCT,CG 112.60 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 761.35 

NIANTIC CT, CG 245.44 

WILTON CT, CG 748.88 

CAMBRIDGE ENGLAND, CG 1 13.48 

W REDDING CT, CG 109.30 

MILFORD CT, CG 442.62 

MERIDEN CT.CG 107.04 

COSCOBCT.CG 195.99 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 160.47 

STAMFORD CT, CG 49 1 .52 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 170.88 

NEW YORK NY CG 6,599.53 

KENTCT.CG 1,431.17 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 1 96.47 

SOUTHTNGTON CT, CG 170.34 

MERRITT ISLAND FL, CG 171.09 

SOMERS CT, CG 490.59 

WESTPORT CT, CG 153.64 



76 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



561 1330762 MINNESOTA MUTUAL LIFE INS CO 

0470949040 MINOR ELIZABETH C 

0462298710 MINORE FRANCIS & KATHLEEN 

5557988000 MINUTEMAN PRESS 

1 594802500 MISCHIANTI JR LOUIS J & JO ANN M 

0193151000 MISTER DONUT 

1 362470750 MISUS GODFREY C & BEVERLY A 

5645046400 MITCHELL DUKE N & SUZANNE 

25978 15340 MITCHELL JOHN H & EMILY P 

06203303 1 MITCHELL JORDAN & SYLVIA 

0890323600 MOHR CHARLES B 

0421671930 MOKRYCKI JOHN JR 

023 1 2342 1 MONCH AMP FLORENCE H 

2152858000 MONITOR MANAGEMENT INC 

2152858000 MONITOR MANAGEMENT INC 

2152858000 MONITOR MANAGEMENT INC 

0773486510 MONRO A LAST AIR M 

0403682280 MONTAGNA ANTHONY & CHRISTINE 

1 1 2425260 MONTEITH WALTER H JR & JANE M 

042269 1 640 MONTEROSE HENRY & KATHLEEN 

6230791000 MONTSTREAM & MAY 

0444296130 MOORE DOUGLAS G & MARGARET S 

3444027900 MOORE MICHAEL P & MARY W 

002221 1570 MOREHOUSE BRADLY W & MARIAN 

0522687440 MORELAND ANDREW C & JOYCE 

0480939990 MORELLI JOSEPH F & VIRGINIA P 

1 09282 1 390 MOREN ARTHUR M JR & DE ANN A 

5022934000 MORGAN RESTAURANT GROUP INC 

0484255790 MORIN MICHAEL 

0375451000 MORRIS PACKAGE 

0864241570 MORRIS ROBERT S 

0433084270 MORRIS WILLIAM G & MAXINE 

5240049000 MORRISON KNUDSEN WHITE OAK 

2152814960 MORRISON THOMAS C 

0170160340 MORSE ELIZABETH N 

0464622200 MORSE ROBERT R & ST ACE Y C 

7777102103 MORWAY CHRISTOPHER F 

1032419110 MOSHER CAROL G 

0420724270 MOSKELL STEPHEN & HELEN 

0752436000 MOUNT CARMEL PACKAGE STORE INC 

4836987002 MR AUTO WASH 

5423256000 MR WATER HEATER 

5423256000 MR WATER HEATER 

4655734000 MRS TS INC 

0861067580 MUCHA CHARLES P ANN 

0422834480 MUCKE MABEL 

0423252430 MUDRY ROBERT J & LORRAINE 

0619312000 MUENCHCOINC 

0712077960 MULLER FRANK B & JUDITH 

0412674600 MULRAIN JOHN C EST OF 

2403887240 MULVEY DAVID G & MONA S 

0483808600 MULVEY JAMES R & JUDITH A 

079 1 09 1 770 MULVEY WILLIAM & MARCELLE 

040201 0870 MUNSON IRA & HELEN 

04052 14310 MUNZER DORON & DONNA 

1 1 1 3489790 MURPHY CHARLES J & KAREN C JR 

0452203000 MURPHY FRANCIS P 

1354864070 MURPHY JAMES D & KRISTIN H 

1393883930 MURRAY W STEPHEN & MUFFIE B 



ST PAUL MN, F&NR 310.35 

MERIDENCT.CG 190.08 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 280.08 

NORWALK CT, SUT 286.33 

GREENWICH CT, CG 410.07 

WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 152.60 

D ANBURY CT, CG 11 6.77 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 29.05 

MILFORDCT.CG 101.88 

STRATFORD CT, CG 262. 14 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 286.73 

ENFIELD CT.CG 384.84 

STRATFORD CT, CG 351.78 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 886.09 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 529.75 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 355.77 

GROTON LONG POINT CT, CG 141.21 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 1 68.00 

NORTH HAVEN CT, CG 140.96 

HADLYMECT.CG 159.17 

GLASTONBURY CT, BU 1,567.81 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 627.03 

DARIENCT.CG 180.56 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 202.50 

COS COB CT, CG 447.39 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 53 1 .76 

GREENWICH CT, CG 731.70 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 1 ,424.41 

WILTON CT.CG 121.86 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 484.67 

ROWAYTON CT, CG 134.84 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 569.22 

EAST HARTFORD CT, SUT 439.69 

GREENWICH CT, CG 7 1 5.58 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 191.86 

NEW YORK NY, CG 223.92 

GLASTONBURY CT, IND 1 35.00 

MCLEAN VA.CG 301.19 

MERIDENCT.CG 125.90 

H AMDEN CT, SUT 1 ,548.47 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 203.35 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 1 12.32 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 1 12.32 

VERNON CT, SUT 749.69 

NAUG ATUCK CT, CG 1 89.20 

HARTFORD CT, CG 668.99 

DANBURYCT.CG 818.00 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 3,497.24 

WESTPORT CT, CG 749. 10 

BRANFORD CT, FID 1 33.27 

NORWALK CT.CG 219.50 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 320.33 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 ,560.55 

N HAVEN CT.CG 164.62 

HUNTINGTON CT, CG 129.02 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 996.93 

E HARTFORD CT, CG 101.30 

WESTON CT.CG 186.00 

GREENE FARMS CT, CG 2,099.64 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



77 



5164271710 
5164271710 
2562858000 
5215616420 
0453426290 
2327011890 
0424402980 
1191061000 
0421202880 
0431259790 
0422670930 
2290642590 
0404853250 
5775677480 
0462425310 
5760186000 
0761957000 
6316509001 
0723031000 
4907176000 
5636956000 
4684288000 
5138052000 
2564284000 
6137319000 
5522327890 
6490601000 
1073015700 
5164029840 
1162654370 
0433028470 
0493494030 
5177571000 
0472690480 
0472690480 
1141038930 
3342823260 
0473098990 
5863683000 
5101803000 
0722314000 
3894763000 
0816678000 
5619077000 
0661082000 
4488177000 
5575972000 
4901518000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 



MUSBURGER BRENT W & ARLENE C 

MUSBURGER BRENT W & ARLENE C 

MUSICLAND #479 

MYERS EMILIEW 

MYGATT KATRINIA A 

MYLES JUNE B 

NADEAU PATRICE & JEANNE 

NAGENRAUFTMARY 

NAGY FRANK 

NAGYJOHNSR 

NAHOM EDMUND & MARIE 

NANAVATI TARA L & DWARKA 

NANOS PAUL & DEMETRA 

NAOROZ MOHAMNED H & RAGNA O 

NARDOZZI ROBERT P 

NASH LAWN MAINTENANCE 

NAT LEVY GLASS CO INC 

NATIONAL CARPET LIQUIDATORS INC 

NATIONAL ENTERPRISES INC 

NATIONAL RENT A FENCE AMERICA I 



WESTON CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
MINNEAPOLIS MN, CORP 
RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
W REDDING CT, CG 
DANBURY CT, CG 
NEW FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
EASTON CT, CG 
EASTON CT, CG 
BROOKFIELD CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
ROWAYTON CT, CG 
MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, SUT 
E NORWALK CT, SUT 
MANCHESTER NH, SUT 
GLEN ALLEN VA, SUT 
DALLAS TX, SUT 



NATIONWIDE CELLULAR SERVICE INC VALLEY STREAM NY, TEL 



VALLEY STREAM NY, TEL 
COLUMBUS OH, CORP 
NAUGATUCK CT, CORP 
MORRIS CT, CORP 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CORP 
WESTON CT, CG 
OLD LYME CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
VERNON CT, CG 
SEYMOUR CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, BU 
JORDAN NY, CG 
JORDAN NY, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
DANBURY CT, CG 



NATIONWIDE CELLULAR SERVICES IN 

NATIONWIDE WAREHOUSE & STORAG 

NAUGATUCK TRIANGLE CORP 

NAUGATUCK VALLEY ELECTRIC INC 

NAVEAU PHLIPPE J 

NAVIOS BUNKERING INC 

NEARY MATIN E 

NEIBAUER RODNEY D & EVA J 

NEIMAN BARBARA 

NERI FRANK G & MARIA A 

NESTERIAK JOSEPH & TERRILYN 

NESTLE HOLDINGS INC 

NETTLETON DONALD & RCHEL A 

NETTLETON DONALD & RCHEL A 

NEUMANN SYLVIA SIMMONS 

NEUNABER NEIL O & FERNTTA J 

NEVES NELSON & BARBARA 

NEW CANAAN AVENUE LIQUOR STORE NORWALK CT, SUT 

NEW ENGLAND DELI ANSONIA CT, SUT 

NEW ENGLAND LOG HOMES INC HAMDEN CT, SUT 

NEW ENGLAND NETWORK INC WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 

NEW ENGLAND OFFICE SUPPLIES INC WILTON CT, SUT 

NEW ENGLAND OVERHEAD DOOR SER NORWALK CT, SUT 

NEW ENGLAND SAFETY SHOE CO INC NEWINGTON CT, SUT 

NEW FAIRFIELD LUNCHEONETTE NEW FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 

NEW LOOK PAINTING INC SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD PRINTING NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 

NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 



2,579.25 
2,579.25 
1,931.00 
318.94 
1,658.24 
406.21 
245.47 
103.94 
338.17 
176.54 
765.81 
598.55 
232.20 
187.15 
102.57 
132.83 
162.97 
750.00 
1,272.00 
249.04 
508.78 
819.85 
5,421.40 
2,894.40 
156.50 
208.85 
1,128.00 
176.92 
156.39 
181.71 
103.68 
831.68 
515.34 
903.90 
903.90 
230.49 
193.53 
144.87 
585.83 
435.33 
1,060.08 
538.46 
905.85 
713.56 
125.92 
210.98 
100.13 
405.77 
198.27 
218.01 
194.32 
196.32 
225.29 
193.23 
190.64 
238.24 
199.33 
231.51 
185.76 



78 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
0847541000 
6191035000 
5611637762 
4328761000 
0573064970 
5277306000 
1321671000 
2950950190 
4443814120 
0452846590 
0173299260 
0672063000 
5713987000 
0765206000 
0292058530 
5170545050 
4606745000 
0464262390 
0420164020 
6174882000 
4560635150 
4883351000 
3324043000 
0454284690 
0402657130 
0282839660 
5713961000 
5713961000 
5713961000 
0431410450 
5142906000 
0536672000 
4069852000 
5367479000 
5367479000 
5367479000 
5367479000 
5367479000 
0462464090 
3451150000 
5615653765 
6277545000 
2375558000 
0717421000 
2434900000 
0402415620 
0402415620 
1492415400 
0462265890 
0392099250 
4706503000 
2929644000 



NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW MILFORD WASHINGTON ANSWER NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 
NEW SHOPS & SMILES INC MERIDEN CT, SUT 

NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPAN NEW YORK NY, F&NR 
NEWBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL INC 
NEWELL IRENE P 
NEWMAN DESIGN ASSOC INC 
NEWMAN HARRY R & LILLIAN L 
NEWMAN PAUL & JOANNE 
NEWMAN RAY G & ANDREA D 
NEWMAN RICHARD & LOTTIE 
NEWSOME ROSALIE C 



GREENWICH CT, CORP 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
MADISON CT, SUT 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
SANTA MONICA CA, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
SPRINGFIELD MA, CG 



NEWSTADT JEWELERS INCORPORATEDNORWALK CT, SUT 



NEWTOWN FEED AND CIDER MILL 

NICHOLAS ARENA ASSOCIATES INC 

NICHOLS ARTHUR B & FRANCES A 

NICHOLSON ARTHUR D & JEAN H 

NICKEL RECORDS INC 

NIEJELOW NICHOLAS & RODIN JUDJT 

NIELSEN FAITH 

NIGHTRIDER OVERNITE COPY SERVIC 

NUENSOHN DANIEL E & GOLDIE 

NINETY ONE DINER 

NO HAVEN APPLIANCE SERVICE CENT 

NOCERINO JERRY A & JUDY A 

NOEL PAUL & SUZANNE 



NEWTOWN CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT.CG 
W REDDING CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 
HAMDEN CT, SUT 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 



NORMAN BARBARA M 
NOROTON MOBIL SERVICE CENTER IN SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 
NOROTON MOBIL SERVICE CENTER IN SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 
NOROTON MOBIL SERVICE CENTER IN SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 



NORRISDE&YH 
NORTH COVE OUTFITTERS INC 
NORTH COVE YACHT CLUB INC 
NORTH HAVEN AUTO PARTS INC 
NORTH HAVEN FLORIST 
NORTH HAVEN FLORIST 
NORTH HAVEN FLORIST 
NORTH HAVEN FLORIST 
NORTH HAVEN FLORIST 
NORTHCOTT JOHN & DOROTHY 
NORTHEAST LANDSCAPE SUPPLY 
NORTHLAND INSURANCE CO 



GROTON CT, CG 
OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 
OLD SAYBROOK CT, ADC 
N HAVEN CT, SUT 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
WESTON CT, CG 
MT VERNON NY, SUT 
SAINT PAUL MN, F&NR 



NORWALK MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES CRNORWALK CT, SUT 



NORWICH GOLF CLUB 
NORWICH TIRE SERVICE INC 
NOVA PRINTING SERVICE INC 
NOVELLA JOSEPH & PATRICIA 
NOVELLA JOSEPH & PATRICIA 
NOVITCH HOWARD & BERYL 
NOWICKI EDWARD F & FLORENCE S 
NO YES MAE P 
NRT TECHNICAL INC 
NUTMEG INTERIORS INC 



NORWICH CT, SUT 
NORWICH CT, SUT 
W HAVEN CT, SUT 
NEW FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NEW FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 
METUCHEN NJ, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 



214.05 
273.48 
274.47 
326.35 
268.47 
306.37 
243.43 
243.43 
172.50 
61,004.68 
304.98 
333.27 
181.29 
1,171.78 
8,189.01 
232.28 
1,059.00 
1,078.79 
150.00 
710.83 
398.45 
796.37 
118.00 
420.62 
312.65 
989.83 
1,203.70 
326.70 
236.04 
170.57 
104.88 
312.71 
133.22 
278.88 
361.02 
434.80 
178.86 
782.88 
248.00 
394.28 
179.15 
133.58 
139.30 
146.76 
138.77 
483.12 
887.74 
3,245.07 
428.06 
154.24 
499.49 
704.97 
461.03 
347.31 
365.78 
202.54 
160.33 
48,917.45 
670.71 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



79 



0021460750 
5768528000 
3994381000 
2401565780 
0441008180 
0282838090 
0452883170 
0446094780 
6379895000 
6379895000 
0424078390 
1301026420 
1174271270 
0453087960 
6389795000 
0554378730 
4766713000 
2660113090 
1123664870 
0445869620 
0126003000 
5124284000 
4892535002 
4892535002 
5936893000 
5936893000 
5936893000 
6406276000 
4883095580 
0880713330 
1882076100 
6391106000 
0054832270 
0563460000 
5511613000 
0903400610 
3372455540 
2644375000 
4399465000 
4399465000 
4399465000 
0623520000 
0698621000 
1 140530990 
1071459100 
5923628000 
5923628000 
5923628000 
5611827762 
0441427130 
1494434330 
5143672001 
1931677020 
0742908000 
0644187000 
0830332310 
0493459000 
0493459000 
1 162282820 



NYHAN WILLIAM & NANCY ORANGE CT, CG 

OAKBROOK TERRACE CORPORATE CE OAKBROOK TERRACE IL, SUT 



OCHMAN HOME APPLIANCES INC 
OCKERS JACOBS M & JANET R 
OCONNELL EDWARD & ELISE 
OCONNELL JOHN J & SUZANNE 
OCONNOR PETER R & ROSE 
OCTAVE ANDREW & ANTOINETTE 
OEI BUSINESS FORMS 
OEI BUSINESS FORMS 
OGDEN DAYTON JR & MARGARET R 
OGDEN PETER K & EMILY E 
OGIELA DENNIS M & GLORIA A 
OHARA MAUREEN E 
OLD GREENWICH TENNIS ACADEMY 
OLIN CORPORATION 
OLIVER NURSERIES 
OLMSTEAD CECIL & FRANCES 
OLOUGHLIN MAURICE E J & GRACE L 
OLSON H DRAKE JR 
ORCHARD EQUIP SPPLYCO 
ORDINARY BIKE SHOP 
ORIENTAL FURNITURE WAREHOUSE 
ORIENTAL FURNITURE WAREHOUSE 
OSLO 
OSLO 
OSLO 

OSPREY COMMUNICATIONS 
OSTFELD ALEX M 
OSULLTVAN EDMOND & JOSEPHINE 
OTTENHEIMER RICHARD J & RUTH J 
OTTOMANELLIS CAFE 
OUELETT ROBERT & MARIELLE 
OVERHEAD DOOR COMPANY INC 
OVERLAND TRADING CO 



TRUMBULL CT, SUT 
MONROE CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
VERNON CT, CG 
WINDSOR CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
ITASCA IL, SUT 
ITASCA IL, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
W REDDING CT.CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
OLD GREENWICH CT, BU 
STAMFORD CT, UN INS 
FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
BASALT CO, CG 
CONWAY MA, SUT 
DANIELSON CT, SUT 
ORANGE CT, SUT 
ORANGE CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, SUT 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
EAST HADDAM CT, CG 
MADISON CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, SUT 
BRISTOL CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, SUT 
WESTFORD MA, SUT 



OVERSTROM GUNNAR S & MARGERY L W HARTFORD CT, CG 



OWEN HONORE M & CANDACE C 

OWL SECURITY AND INVESTIGATION 

P AND D AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES INC 

P AND D AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES INC 

P AND D AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES INC 

P F COLLIER INC 

P W CRAWLEY SALES INC 

PABSTIRTNAD 

PACE ANGELO & NORMA T 

PACE MEMBERSHIP WAREHOUSE INC 

PACE MEMBERSHIP WAREHOUSE INC 

PACE MEMBERSHIP WAREHOUSE INC 

PACIFIC FIDELITY LIFE INS CO 

PADDOCK MILDRED C 

PADDON JAMES R 

PAESANOS DELI INC 

PAGANO EDWARD L & ADELE 

PAGE WARNER INC 

PAGE HARDWARE APPLIANCE CO 

PAINTER BORDEN W 

PALERMO GEORGE & RITA 

PALERMO GEORGE & RITA 

PALMER DYNA 



SIMSBURY CT, CG 
WHITE PLAINS NY, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
NEW YORK NY, CORP 
W HARTFORD CT, CORP 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
LIME ROCK CT, CG 
ENGLEWOOD CO, SUT 
ENGLEWOOD CO, SUT 
ENGLEWOOD CO 
CEDAR RAPIDS IA, F&NR 
CROMWELL CT, CG 
MYSTIC CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, SUT 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
MIDDLETOWN CT, SUT 
GUILFORD CT, SUT 
WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
N HAVEN CT.CG 



333.80 
167.27 
643.51 
131.72 
389.54 
381.70 
141.99 
329.28 

5,342.81 

4,235.60 
197.72 
485.93 
224.98 
126.10 

4,405.57 
160.63 

1,354.05 
130.67 

3,226.91 
114.48 
662.79 
298.58 
902.34 
491.53 
890.37 
943.65 
858.66 
361.49 
101.12 
128.26 
229.59 
361.94 
162.74 

1,184.73 
319.05 
246.67 
205.19 
292.72 
514.23 
385.21 
488.01 

1,736.60 

177.08 

431.16 

160.93 

28,489.45 

28,489.45 

249.05 

18,728.44 

195.54 

598.20 

162.83 

527.35 

739.25 

3,646.79 

101.40 

402.66 

509.23 

15,467.75 



80 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0481867900 
0422299990 
0472823860 
0434630180 
0432411290 
0812024840 
0934673830 
4815049000 
4815049000 
5699772000 
0466474750 
0983811380 
2070317470 
4592309000 
5487897000 
0543800500 
2174459130 
0403271630 
3094248370 
0670940020 
7777115829 
1432456760 
0590778920 
0881240040 
0421022740 
6042741000 
5003081150 
0705509000 
0173475430 
0612168000 
0403035780 
6270375000 
6270375000 
4669257280 
4084133000 
7777113420 
0694372000 
5040969000 
5806781000 
5661541000 
5661541000 
5661541000 
0023076250 
6379911000 
0470153690 
5789979000 
4508313000 
5932363000 
0653827740 
3434414740 
0672625690 
0472818820 
0480915520 
3835602550 
0820758100 
5333638000 
6159750000 
5615778765 
0451488250 



PALMER PAUL P & PHYLLIS H 
PALOVCHECK EDWARD 
PALUMBO WILLIAM J 
PANELLA WILLIAM 
PANTALENA RAYMOND & MARY 
PANUZIO FRANK L & MARY N 
PAPP CAROL & BARBARA 
PAR FOUR RESTAURANT 
PAR FOUR RESTAURANT 
PARAMOUNT CONSTRUCTION 
PARAVATI JOSEPH S & PATRICIA 
PARENT MICHAEL R & SUSAN L 
PARIS PETER E V & SELDEN MURIEL 



RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
BETHANY CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 
COS COB CT, CG 
GROTON CT, SUT 
GROTON CT, SUT 
E HARTLAND CT, SUT 
BROOKFIELD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
BOSTON MA. CG 



PARK AVENUE INVESTMENT GROUP IN HAMDEN CT, CORP 



PARK LIQUOR 

PARKER GABRIELLE 

PARKER RICHARD K & PATRICIA T 

PARRELU MERRICK A & MARIANNA J 

PARROT TED L & PAMELA T 

PARSELL RICHARD K 

PARSKY ISADORE 

PARSONS JOHN B & FRANCES H 

PASCHALE HADAMENI I 

PASSAGGIO CHARLES 

PASSANESI SEB J 

PASTA PLUS 

PASTEL HARVEY & JANE R 

PATERSONS BUSINESS MACHINES INC 

PATRIKIS PETER & KATHRYN A 

PATS TIRE SHOP INC 



WEST HAVEN CT, SUT 
WHITE PLAINS NY, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
SPRING HILL FL, CG 
OVERLAND PARK KS, CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
BLOOMFIELD CT, IND 
FARMINGTON CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
CHESHIRE CT, CG 
MIDDLETOWN CT, CG 
CHESHIRE CT, SUT 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
CLINTON CT, SUT 
TOLLAND CT, CG 



PATTA VINA CARL J & MARGARET 

PATTEN BROOK RESTAURANT AND PIZ SOUTHINGTON CT, SUT 

PATTEN BROOK RESTAURANT AND PIZ SOUTHINGTON CT, SUT 



PATTIST TODD W & KAREN W 

PATTYS PANTRY 

PATURYNSKI NICK AND YVONNE 

PAUL BUETTNER FLORIST INC 

PAUL F HOPPER ARCHITECTS 

PAUL JOHNSON ELECTRIC INC 

PAUL LARISSO ENTERPRISES INC 

PAUL LARISSO ENTERPRISES INC 

PAUL LARISSO ENTERPRISES INC 

PAUL SAMUEL N & SARAH G 

PAULS SCARY CAR STEREO 

PAVANO THOMAS & LUCY 

PAYROLL 1 

PC PLUS INC 

PC UNLIMITED INC 

PEARCE ANDREW 

PEARL STEWART W & JACQUELINE M 

PEARLMAN HERBERT M & SHERYL 

PEARLMAN JERRY W & BETSY Z 

PEARSON JOHN B & JENNIE W 

PEARSON PETER M & WENDY S 

PEARSON WILLIAM & AMELIA 

PECK R BRUCE 

PEDDLER 

PEERLESS INSURANCE CO 

PEISACH HERMAN E & HENNY 



MIDDLEFIELD CT, CG 
SOUTHBURY CT, SUT 
WILTON CT, IND 
E HARTFORD CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, SUT 
POMFRET CENTER CT, CORP 
W HAVEN CT, SUT 
W HAVEN CT, SUT 
W HAVEN CT, SUT 
W GRANBY CT, CG 
WATERFORD CT, SUT 
PLAINVILLE CT, CG 
CROMWELL CT, SUT 
WATERBURY CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
NEWINGTON CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
COLLINSVILLE CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
TRUMBULL CT, SUT 
ESSEX CT, SUT 
KEENE NH, F&NR 
NORWALK CT, CG 



368.40 
208.52 
346.32 
206.36 
147.42 
352.89 
981.90 
251.64 
380.52 
114.49 
177.02 
196.01 
705.06 
600.23 
280.29 
434.10 
542.60 
473.30 
157.50 
147.05 
396.58 
370.70 
175.32 
161.35 
444.18 
712.43 
181.35 
830.18 
173.01 
400.49 
104.38 
170.54 
261.44 
174.19 
176.35 
125.44 
315.02 
128.98 
165.10 
566.08 
625.23 
697.36 
368.72 
451.37 
156.40 
665.23 
948.41 
196.25 
362.15 
333.80 

1,103.90 
157.19 
709.05 
286.33 
104.60 

1,464.44 

247.16 

62,184.12 

431.64 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



81 



0763226740 PETTZER BERNARD & MYRA 

045 1 282430 PELLEGRINO LOUIS & ELEANOR 

0472470 170 PELLEGRINO LUIGI D & BLANCHE J 

0484696270 PELLETIER EDWARD A & JAYNE F 

0692872490 PELTON WARREN F & PATRICIA W 

0474847200 PELTZER THOMAS J & KAREN L 

561 5786765 PENN GENERAL INSURANCE CO 

5 195 177000 PENN TRADING INTERNATIONAL LTD 

1035823000 PENNSYLVANIA TRUCK LINES INC 

6163729000 PENRY CREATIVE 

6163729000 PENRY CREATIVE 

0451636980 PEPE THOMAS & ANN 

4506440000 PEPPINOS 

4506440000 PEPPINOS 

4506440000 PEPPINOS 

4506440000 PEPPINOS 

4506440000 PEPPINOS 

4622437002 PERFECT PARTY INC 

4622437002 PERFECT PARTY INC 

4622437001 PERFECT PARTY INC 

4622437001 PERFECT PARTY INC 

6304471000 PERFORMANCE TECHNOLOGIES 

0412644890 PERGOLA CHLES A & YVETTE 

045 1 402760 PERGOLA LAWRENCE & PHILOMENA 

0082868910 PERKIN JOHN T & ELIZABETH 

0584623660 PERONA PATRICIA L 

0321013250 PERREAULT RAYMOND J & INA S 

7777117896 PERREAULT RICHARD 

0482680370 PERRELLI ANTHONY & RAMONA 

0430192950 PERRY MICHAEL R & MARGHERJTA R 

4369864000 PERSONACARE OF CONNECTICUT INC 

0838177000 PERSONNEL LABORATORY INC THE 

1 124495060 PESCHEL MICHAEL & ROB YN 

1023811000 PETER PERIMENIS DDS PC 

1191877560 PETERLE JOY LEE 

0480957210 PETERS PETER J & ALDAN A K 

0633776000 PETERSON LANDSCAPING SERVICE IN 

4300356000 PETIT TOOL COMPANY 

0491406460 PETRONELL A ROBERT & ROSEMARIE 

0144615370 PETROWSKI JOSEPH H & DEBRA T 

0484069700 PETTEE TIMOTHY P 

0832026220 PFEIFFER KENNETH H & SYBILLA K 

2692036510 PFEIFFER RALPH A & JANE C JR 

3 133882990 PHILIPPE LEO & HERMINE 

5735295200 PHILLIPS IAN & BARBARA 

5735295200 PHILLIPS IAN & BARBARA 

0473480410 PHILLIPS RICHARD B & KATHRYN S 

5988464000 PHILLYS RESTAURANT OF HAMDEN IN 

4137097000 PHOENK TEXTILE CORPORATION 

3398823004 PHOTO QUICK OF CONNECTICUT INC 

3398823003 PHOTO QUICK OF NOR WALK 

6286017000 PHOTO SNAP INC 

3398823000 PHOTOQUICK OF GREENWICH 

1 584090570 PIC ARILLO RAYMOND & MARY 

0362649740 PICKAR MICHAEL & MILLIE 

0512898400 PICKRELL ROBERT M & BEVERLY A 

0372034480 PIERCE ROBERT V & MARIE E 

0033889400 PIERPONT JOHN W & JANET M 

2171452180 PILERT MARSHALL L 



STAMFORD CT, CG 178.25 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 571.99 

STONINGTON CT, CG 108.92 

WILLIMANTICCT.CG 123.68 

WESTPORT CT, CG 172.54 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 228.74 

PHILADELPHIA PA, F&NR 27,822.10 

TREVOSE PA, CORP 5 1 0.20 

CONSHOHOCKEN PA, CORP 452. 80 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 237.97 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 200.65 

WILLTMANTIC CT, CG 644.55 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 392.27 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 388.40 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 372.69 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 410.09 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 343.82 

ORANGE CT, SUT 332.22 

ORANGE CT, SUT 223.57 

ORANGE CT, SUT 395.34 

ORANGE CT, SUT 362.88 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 347.29 

EASTONCT.CG 154.43 

TORRINGTONCT.CG 364.00 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 1 ,586.51 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 272.70 

SUFFIELD CT, CG 184.38 

MANSFIELD CENTER CT, IND 540.00 

MADISON CT.CG 126.24 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 19.76 

STAMFORD CT, COR " 1 ,8 1 9.40 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 490.56 

LAKE VILLE CT, CG 295. 89 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 174.40 

STONINGTON CT, CG 351.71 

STRATFORD CT, CG 109.22 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 361.84 

THOMASTON CT, SUT 1 86.90 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 327.89 

WESTON CT,CG 186.44 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 610.91 

WILTON CT, CG 126.39 

GREENWICH CT, CG 3,743.62 

ALPHATETTA GA, CG 107.08 

NORWALK CT, CG 192.90 

NORWALK CT, CG 654.74 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 190.40 

HAMDEN CT, SUT 1 08.29 

ST LOUIS MO, SUT 241.30 

TRUMBULL CT, SUT 170.66 

NORWALK CT, SUT 25 1 .63 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 456.45 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 480.84 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 234.97 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 102.40 

WESTPORT CT, CG 290. 89 

NIANTICCT.CG 112.84 

DARIENCT,CG 598.51 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 207.70 



82 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0442686450 PILKINGTON CHARLES F & FRANCES 

1 164019170 PILLA THOMAS & ELAINE 

43 1 1 296000 PILOT EXECUTIVE SOFTWARE INC 

0497465 170 PINCHIN DAVID C & GLENYS 

4315248000 PINCHOT & COMPANY 

0813824730 PINCOTT STEVEN & MAXINE 

4516159001 PINEWOODS RACQUET CLUB 

2012601220 PISACICH BERNARD J & JUDITH H 

0463 877670 PISCITELLI AM ALIA P & CLEMENT N 

0482272 160 PITE ARTHUR M & NANCY 

1 002626260 PITT HARRIET S 

485549 1 090 PLADSEN KENNETH & JUDY Y 

0453048420 PLATT JOEL & BETTE 

0444865590 PLAUT EDWARD W & ROBIN D 

4507521000 POKEYS ICE CREAM 

361 2043090 POLC YN STANLEY & CAROLE 

6085617000 POLICE SICK BENEFIT ASSOC OF BP 

6085617000 POLICE SICK BENEFIT ASSOC OF BP 

6085617000 POLICE SICK BENEFIT ASSOC OF BP 

021 2439660 POLLARD CHARLES F & LIDABELL L 

277443 1 650 POLLE Y PAUL B & CH ARI I 

0570044000 POLZERS INC 

4022703000 POMFRET ANTIQUE WORLD 

4022703000 POMFRET ANTIQUE WORLD 

4022703000 POMFRET ANTIQUE WORLD 

4022703000 POMFRET ANTIQUE WORLD 

0462697 100 POMPADUR I MARTIN & MARIAN 

0433282250 POMPEA ANN 

0943889180 POOL WILLIAM H & MARY H 

046 1 872940 POPKINS EDWARD J & ANN R 

4939732000 POPULAR RESTAURANT 

4939732000 POPULAR RESTAURANT 

3484557000 PORT MILFORD MARINA 

5 158308000 PORT NIANTIC INC 

0453215380 PORTANOVA DANIEL D & AGNETA 

1 102854570 PORTER ERFORD E & JANE M 

0421830770 PORTO CARL 

3380153 130 POSENER GEORGE G 

0412009730 POSEY CHESTER L 

5794053220 POST GEORGE B & LINDA M 

7777 108002 POST JASON R 

4238705000 POST PUBLISHING COMPANY THE 

0480968400 POSTOL SIDNEY S & EUNICE 

0480968400 POSTOL SIDNEY S & EUNICE 

048 1 034730 POTOFF RUBIN & GILD A 

0403840140 POVERMAN DAVID & HELEN 

3303868490 POWELL JOHN R & MARILYN T 

0483007650 POWELL JULIUS & PATRICIA 

0543 855420 POWERS BRIAN M & PAULA H 

1001697890 POWERS EDWARD & HELEN 

0463296240 POWERS MELVYN J & MARY P 

1210147030 POWERS ROBERT A & MARIAN V 

0463820960 POWLEY CLARE 

0322476690 POWLEY MARK E & LORRAINE W 

043 1 887560 PRATT LORRAINE D 

0442290530 PRAY MALCOLM JR 

0586456940 PREBENSEN P PREBEN & ANNE S 

5202338000 PRECISION COMPUTER SYSTEMS INC 

6322432000 PRECISION TRAINING SOFTWARE INC 



VERNON CT.CG 124.40 

NEW MILFORD CT, CG 802. 19 

BOSTON MA, SUT 1 29.60 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 ,93 1 . 82 

BRANFORD CT, SUT 1 17.00 

WINDSOR CT, CG 287.66 

TORRINGTON CT, ADC 1 99.67 

WATERFORD CT, CG 230.59 

HAMDENCT.CG 127.50 

MILFORD CT.CG 110.95 

WOODSTOCK CT, CG 552.57 

GRANBYCT.CG 269.00 

BLOOMFIELDCT.CG 125.77 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 273.96 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 325.12 

NEWTOWN CT, CG 1 00. 1 4 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CORP 1 ,627.60 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CORP 524.30 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CORP 1 ,282.20 

FARMTNGTON CT, CG 405.06 

WESTPORT CT, CG 459.99 

NEW CANAAN CT, CORP 170.00 

MANSFIELD DEPOT CT, SUT 3 1 8.65 

MANSFIELD DEPOT CT, SUT 339.65 

MANSFIELD DEPOT CT, SUT 313.36 

MANSFIELD DEPOT CT, SUT 307.71 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1,615.70 

SHERMAN CT, CG 1 1 4.54 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 88. 13 

STAMFORD CT, CG 140.60 

PLANTSVILLE CT, SUT 309.63 

PLANTSVILLE CT, SUT 202.30 

MILFORD CT, CORP 1,1 10.70 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 758. 16 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 342.80 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 1 14.64 

HAMDEN CT, CG 106.43 

ORANGE CT.CG 362.13 

GREENWICH CT.CG 967.05 

NORWALK CT, CG 1 ,255.27 

CROMWELL CT, IND 144.00 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CORP 27,956.60 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 634.80 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 364. 80 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 475.91 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 351.07 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 28.04 

PARSONSBURG MD, CG 197.81 

HILLSBOROUGH CA, CG 265.68 

HARTFORD CT, CG 21 1.32 

DANBURYCT.CG 129.68 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,051.96 

MADISON CT, CG 799.78 

OLD LYME CT, CG 239.25 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 240. 19 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 9 1 .50 

LONDON ENGLAND, CG 567.39 

SIOUX FALLS SD, CORP 136.40 

EASTFORD CT, SUT 104.10 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



83 



4408886000 PREFERRED PRINTING SERVICES INC 

0430786800 PRELLI FRANK & GERTRUDE R 

0482474120 PRESCOTT BLAKE D & HELEN H 

031 1429870 PRESCOTT DAVID L & JO ANN C 

0462466660 PRESSON JERRY M & MARGARET E 

5831896000 PRESTIGE RESOURCES INC 

0922099610 PRESTO ORLANDO & ROSE 

048036221 PRE VEDINI V AL & ELEANOR 

4627147000 PRICE COMPANY 

3546090000 PRIME LEASING INC 

3546090000 PRIME LEASING INC 

3558202000 PRTNTKO FILM LTD 

0594406970 PRTNTZ-KOPELSON GENE & MTNDY 

049 1 272940 PRISCO CHRISTOPHER & GEORG ANA 

597893700 1 PRISM PIZZA INC 

5177738000 PRO ELECTRIC INC 

5235205000 PRO PARK INC 

3717493000 PROFESSIONAL MARKETING SERVICES 

6357867000 PROFESSIONALS LIBRARY 

5423652000 PROJECT PLANNING GROUP INC 

5423652000 PROJECT PLANNING GROUP INC 

5423652000 PROJECT PLANNING GROUP INC 

5615968765 PROTECTION MUTUAL INSURANCE CO 

2237352000 PROWLER TIRE CORPORATION THE 

5565494000 PRUDENTIAL HOME MORTGAGE CO IN 

0879833000 PUBLIC WORKS SUPPLY CO INC 

1232688120 PUCCINI ARTHUR V & JOAN D 

1042620420 PUCCINI JOAN D 

6416630730 PULLMAN & COMLEY 

6416630730 PULLMAN & COMLEY 

6416630730 PULLMAN & COMLEY 

0413834550 PURVIS DAVID S & SALLY B 

0413410260 PUSCHEL GERALD W & LOUISE 

0599 100000 PUTNAM CONTRACTING INC 

045 1 244850 PUTRIMENT PETER L & PAULINE 

2248557000 PYRAMID REAL ESTATE MANAGEMEN 

2248557000 PYRAMID REAL ESTATE MANAGEMEN 

2248557000 PYRAMID REAL ESTATE MANAGEMEN 

1203736000 QUADREL BROS TKG CO INC 

0473037980 QUAGLIAROLI CORNELIUS T & FAITH 

0490519020 QUARANTA ANTHONY & BESSIE 

0190351 180 QUAY PATRICK & CATHERINE H 

0480769570 QUINN CHARLES J & JOSEPHINE A 

2876332000 R & S DOMESTICS INC 

3875846000 RCI 

3483468000 RJDrNA&COINC 

109943 1000 R J REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 

3544343000 R J S ASSOCIATES INC 

3544343000 R J S ASSOCIATES INC 

5062096000 RJS TEMPS INC 

5604004000 RLPINC 

0056325000 RLSCTNTO CO 

5487756000 R R B SYSTEMS 

3492766000 R R M SPENCERS INCORPORATED 

1122649180 RABINOWJTZ ROBERT & CAROL G 

0274406570 RADOCHIA PETER A & KTMBERLY M 

0400526770 RAIS EN VIRGINIA P 

0313612810 RAKIC PASKO & GOLDMAN-RAKIC P S 

0402029400 RAKIETEN HELEN 



SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 935.96 

WINSTED CT, CG 525.61 

ASHFORD CT, CG 104.44 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, CG 119.08 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 672.76 

WILTON CT, SUT 686.74 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 85.72 

MERJDENCT.CG 457.15 

SAN DIEGO CA, CORP 22,521 .00 

ROSEMONT IL, SUT 8,458.87 

ROSEMONT IL, SUT 8,000.50 

BRANFORD CT, SUT 723.07 

WESTON CT.CG 109.60 

HAMDEN CT, CG 1 ,030.05 

DERBY CT, SUT 529.35 

ANSONIA CT, SUT 1 17.85 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 1 ,876.74 

WESTPORT CT, SUT 487.73 

POUGHAUAG NY, SUT 1,101.90 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 843.70 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 843.70 

STAMFORD CT, CORP 2,604.60 

PARK RIDGE IL, F&NR 1 ,892.34 

GUILFORD CT, CORP 1 ,402. 10 

FREDERICK MD, BU 158.86 

DANVERS MA, SUT 1 52.90 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 133.59 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 288.60 

BRIDGEPORT CT, UN INS 2,3 1 5. 82 

BRIDGEPORT CT, UN INS 597.34 

BRIDGEPORT CT, UN INS 542. 88 

WESTON CT.CG 616.98 

GREENWICH CT, CG 321.25 

PLAINVILLE CT, SUT 2,355.28 

E WINDSOR CT, CG 333.22 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 646.01 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 1 ,360. 89 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 2,777.74 

RAHWAYNJ.MC 600.00 

WINDSOR LOCKS CT, CG 202.97 

WETHERSFTELD CT, CG 1 45.50 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 1 37.74 

VERO BEACH FL, CG 214.92 

TRUMBULL CT, SUT 433.92 

E HARTFORD CT, SUT 340.40 

EASTON CT, SUT 459.59 

WINSTON SALEM NC, SUT 2,256.08 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 826.05 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 764.35 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 148.70 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 217.27 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 1 ,210.22 

AVON CT, SUT 236.01 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 359.56 

STAMFORD CT, CG 366.78 

MANCHESTER MA, CG 273.78 

HAMDEN CT, CG 240.46 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 227.70 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 131.76 



84 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



3739604001 RAM ADA INN MYSTIC 

4424456480 RAMSEY HERSCHEL R & MARY A 

0992277930 RANDALL RUSSELL E JR 

6039531000 RANDALLS INC 

5203236160 RANHOFFANNER 

5081079600 RANKIN J L & GERTRUDE 

640 1 574000 RANP AK CORPORATION 

0371861070 RAPOSA EDWARD & CATHLEEN 

0476000880 RATHNMAN JULIET I 

0476000880 RATHNMAN JULIET I 

1291008010 RAYMOND EDWARD & MARY 

5679659000 RAYS PACKAGE STORE INC 

4752663000 RDS STONE AND GARDEN 

3263429960 READING WILLIAM D & MARY LEE 

041 1429810 REBACK DANIEL & JOYCE 

044058 1 620 REBOCK ROBERT & THELMA 

4033635000 REDDING RIDGE MKT 

201323 1350 REDLING JOSEPH & ANNA 

5622863460 REED FRANCIS W & BARBARA A 

1 152478830 REENS LOUIS H & PAULA 

5182118000 REGAL WINDOW SYSTEMS INC 

045260 1 820 REGIS RICHARD R & NAOMI 

0104237750 REID ANDREW 

1150168170 REID DANIEL & RHODA 

0423442860 REID JOHN EJH 

1 1 82083540 REIER STANLEY & M ARCIA 

0421223550 REILLY F MICHAEL 

045 1 47 1 690 REILLY ROBERT J & AMELIA A 

1083405790 REILLY SEPHEN W & BARBARA L 

0482602790 REILLY WAYNE H 

5515618320 REINITZ RUDOLPH C & AHUVA 

0714774000 REMA DRI VAC CORP 

1 13 1600530 REMMER PATRICIA C & EUGENE M 

0443254700 RENEY RICHARD & SUSAN 

2983281210 RENZENBROINK ALBERT & PATRICIA 

40233 1 3000 RESORT TRAVEL CLUB 

5 1 80054000 RETAIL CONSUMER TECHNOLOGY INC 

0042456860 REUMAN WARREN T 

4458766000 REUTERS INFORMATION SERVICES IN 

574700 1 000 REVERE TRANSDUCERS INC 

2286946000 REVZON RENTALS 

0464227350 REYNOLDS ROGER J & MARIE A 

0422840170 RHEAUME ROBERT & LORRAINE 

0423064580 RHODE JOHN R & DONNA J 

048241 1 160 RICCIO LOUIS A & JENNIE M 

0460330730 RICE CHARLES & EDNA 

5423217210 RICE JACQUELINE M 

0602466000 RICHARD HARRIS INC 

0483692940 RICHARDS EL VIA E 

0444236020 RICHARDS MARK W & DEBORAH B 

7777 1 1 6377 RICHITELLI LOUIS J JR 

5287487000 RICHLEN AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE INC 

1 153040570 RICHMAN DONALD G & PEARL G 

0480747340 RICHMAN GEORGE Y & ROSALIND 

5483664820 RICHMOND THOMAS L 

3580594000 RICK HEGENBERGER & ASSOCIATES I 

4095429670 RIEGLE CHARLES W & AUSRA V 

4095429670 RIEGLE CHARLES W & AUSRA V 

0602674590 RIGG ELIZABETH S 



WAKEFIELDMA.RO 1,400.83 

PARKER CO, CG 362.40 

NORTH HAMPTON NH, CG 1 64.39 

W HAVEN CT, SUT 385.99 

POMFRETCT.CG 215.28 

WESTON CT.CG 415.47 

PAINESVILLE OH, CORP 391.00 

WILTON CT, CG 462.03 

NORWICH CT, CG 265.97 

NORWICH CT, CG 265.97 

LITCHFIELD CT, CG 191 .70 

D ANBURY CT, SUT 4 1 9.79 

NEWTOWN CT, SUT 558.75 

WILTON CT, CG 203.30 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 50.54 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 1 40.28 

REDDING CT, SUT 265.44 

WALLINGFORD CT, CG 156. 13 

COSCOBCT.CG 114.48 

WILTON CT, CG 328.90 

NEWINGTON CT, SUT 828. 17 

DANIELSON CT, CG 5 1 0.01 

GREENWICH CT, CG 233.28 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 ,697.42 

STAMFORD CT, CG 308.52 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 467. 17 

COS COB CT, CG 239.24 

ROCKY HILL CT, CG 120.30 

WESTPORT CT, CG 203.90 

MERIDENCT.CG 100.26 

GREENWICH CT, CG 122.24 

NORWALK CT, CORP 635.80 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 3 ,036.22 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 377.54 

ALPH ARETTA G A, CG 48 1 .30 

MILFORD CT, SUT 327.44 

EAST WINDSOR CT, SUT 628.27 

DARIENCT.CG 139.45 

NEW YORK NY, SUT 1 ,9 1 5.55 

WLLINGFORD CT, SUT 3 1 5. 86 

NEWINGTON CT, SUT 463.91 

NEWINGTON CT, CG 203. 12 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 1 17.28 

ROW A YTON CT, CG 1 82. 16 

ORANGE CT,CG 112.61 

POQUONOCK CT, CG 42 1 .34 

GUILFORD CT, CG 1 52.68 

AVON CT, SUT 139.84 

HARTFORD CT, CG 439.43 

CLINTON CT, CG 1 44.03 

MILFORD CT, IND 1 68.44 

CROMWELL CT, SUT 236.84 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 9 1 .09 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 652.40 

KILLINGWORTH CT, CG 200.49 

WESTPORT CT, SUT 8 1 6.00 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 1 1 4.00 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 230.04 

GREENWICH CT. CG 589.20 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



85 



2614156230 
0482045500 
1 132494950 
0403842410 
4543414430 
7777112955 
7787710019 
5817200000 
5817200000 
5817200000 
5817200000 
5817200000 
6409486000 
0443099750 
1272838020 
0752636500 
1248327000 
3407087000 
7777116070 
0454071060 
0403021160 
1253896640 
1752612350 
0871870710 
2031224480 
1002006310 
0444895510 
5587613000 
1343696360 
0422640810 
1012236600 
0162483410 
0603357000 
6292049000 
0652443860 
0434292310 
0434002320 
0434002320 
0441225100 
7777114465 
0673201650 
0589762000 
5276365000 
5276365000 
1121631290 
0182464160 
0463296540 
0482813100 
0424805450 
2191427150 
0463649220 
1092293420 
0960707620 
0634283150 
0341078510 
0482084930 
2274836740 
3192994000 
0473479560 



RILEY ELIZABETH T & PATRICK M 

RILEY JAMES R & PAMELA J 

RILEY JOHN L & CAROL 

RILEY MARY B 

RIPLEY LEONARD & ADRIENNE 

RITTER RICHARD L 

RITZEL RICHARD 

RIVERSIDE GROUP 

RIVERSIDE GROUP 

RIVERSIDE GROUP 

RIVERSIDE GROUP 

RIVERSIDE GROUP 

RIVERSIDE GULF 

RIZZO ANTHONY M & JOAN 

RIZZUTO LEANDRO P 

ROBBINS JACQUES A & SUZANNE G 



RJJX3EFIELD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
N CANTON CT, CG 
BAR HARBOR ME, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
GREENS FARMS CT, IND 
EASTON CT, IND 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
COLLINSVILLE CT, SUT 
DANBURY CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 



ROBBINS MOTOR TRANSPORTATION INESSINGTON PA, MC 



ROBERT TAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY 
ROBERTO BRENDA 
ROBERTS ELIZABETH V A 
ROBERTS FREDERICK G JR & RHODA 
ROBERTSON BRUCE & SHARON 
ROBERTSON NATHANIEL G m 
ROBINS LEONARD & SELMA 
ROBINSON FERN H 
ROBINSON FRANK W 
ROBINSON LAUREI L 
ROBS GOLF SHOP 



SHELTON CT, SUT 
BOYNTON BEACH FL, IND 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
HADLYME CT, CG 
DELRAY BEACH FL, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
WHITE PLAINS NY, CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
BERLIN CT, SUT 



ROCKWOOD WILLIAM O JR & KATHLEEWESTON CT, CG 



RODER MELVIN & RUTH 
RODRIGUEZ J PAUL & JUDITH D 
ROGERS SIDNEY & HARRIET 
ROGOVINS FURNITURE CENTRE INC 
ROKO INC 
ROLLA MARIE 
ROMAN DANIEL & DEBRA 
ROMANIELLO ALICE G 
ROMANIELLO ALICE G 
ROMANIK TESSIE 
ROMANOS PATRICIA 
ROMTNG MARZELL & KARLA 
RONCARI INDUSTRIES 
ROOM PLUS FURNITURE 
ROOM PLUS FURNITURE 
ROONEY BRENDAN P & NANCY E 
ROOSEN WILLEM W & LEILA 
ROPER DANIEL V & JUDITH A 
ROSA SALVATORE & SANDRA 
ROSE DOUGLAS B & DONNA C 
ROSEN HOBART E & NORMA 
ROSEN STEVEN L & SANDRA 
ROSENBERG DONALD & SONDRA 
ROSENBERG JULIUS 
ROSENBERG RALPH & HILDA 
ROSENFIELD RAYMOMD & MAUREEN 
ROSENTHAL IRVING H & HELEN A 
ROSENTHAL MARICA 
ROSEY THE BUGS LOG N LANTERN CA 
ROSS STEVEN A & FRANCES K 



W HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
NORTH HAVEN CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
MERIDEN CT, CG 
NEW BRITAIN CT, FID 
NEW BRITAIN CT, FID 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, IND 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
EAST GRANBY CT, SUT 
PATERSON NJ, CORP 
PATERSON NJ, SUT 
DARIEN CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
E GRANBY CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 
DANBURY CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
AVON CT, CG 
LONGBOAT KEY FL, CG 
BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
YANTIC CT, SUT 
HEBRON CT, CG 



1,426.71 
686.21 
185.04 
964.81 
363.84 
132.00 
106.25 
180.00 
180.00 
233.39 
294.30 
198.85 
125.75 
811.46 

3,618.49 
411.64 
600.00 
301.54 
240.00 

1,160.63 
104.88 
128.92 
663.58 
135.22 
700.00 
112.50 
193.90 

1,169.97 
289.45 
267.78 
258.69 
235.98 
328.97 
173.71 
223.00 
364.22 
119.86 
118.42 
109.26 
189.60 
121.01 
849.63 
193.20 
541.41 
161.51 
256.17 
321.90 
317.09 
208.88 
291.15 
307.66 
101.81 

1,469.10 
118.12 

3,290.86 
346.49 
209.90 

7,064.67 
303.85 



86 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0481890180 

0332853790 

0494204260 

0673496660 

0512872720 

0472472430 

7777112954 

0471271190 

1961244060 

4700555000 

2209138000 

0412486870 

0442696680 

0262809710 

4142998000 

1873601580 

1063630800 

4076034570 

4076034570 

1256284840 

0793428690 

0482892150 

0402835430 

0402835430 

0402835430 

0420174520 

5703024000 

0423002040 

4533694440 

0433864030 

0782706000 

4361341000 

1 102623080 

0462224870 

0696237000 

6195671000 

0607630000 

1754408360 

0412869320 

3213061750 

1222040900 

4474722000 

4474722000 

5238084000 

0464464230 

0473414730 

0421638760' 

0103646850 

0483640100 

0414031090 

4997516000 

0494963002 

7777112311 

7777113635 

0962456280 

0494014900 

1543292450 

0774278020 

0812470760 



ROSSI ALVA & MARGARET S WINDSOR CT, CG 

ROTENBERG DONALD A & MAUREEN E W HARTFORD CT, CG 
ROTH DAVID M & LINDA H W HARTFORD CT, CG 

ROTH JONATHAN B & BARBARA WESTPORT CT, CG 

ROTHBALLER ROGER W & MARIANNE NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
ROTHENBERG SEYMOUR A & FRANCES WINDSOR CT, CG 



ROTHMAN JOY ANN 

ROTTM AN CHARLES 

ROUSSEAN WALTER F & ELIZABETH 

ROUTE 7 CONVERTIBLES INC 

ROUTE 80 LIQUOR STORE 

ROVELLA SANTO & ROSEMARY 

ROWAN MICHAEL & VIRGINIA 

ROWLAND DOROTHY E 

ROYB AL & SONS FIRE EQUIPMENT 

RUBEN BARBARA J 

RUBENSTEIN FRANKLIN D & SUSAN 

RUCH THOMAS L & DIANNE S 

RUCH THOMAS L & DIANNE S 

RUDICH REUVEN & DALIA 

RUDNICK DAVID L & GAIL 

RUGGIERO CARL & JUDY 

RUMELY PATRICIA A 

RUMELY PATRICIA A 

RUMELY PATRICIA A 

RUSSAK MARY A 

RUSSELL CHARLES H 

RUSSELL RICHARD & ELIZABETH 

RUSSO ANTHONY S & MARY ANN 

RUTGERS {CATHERINE 

RUTH CHASE FLOWERS INC 

RWJ SOFTWARE SYSTEMS 

RYAN LAWRENCE 

RYNASKI CHESTER H & JEANNETTE W 

S&S AUTOMATIC INC 

S AND E LUMB JEWELERS 

SEPOLUDNIAKINC 

S ABINA CRAIG W & BENDER JEAN H 

SACKMAN HARRY & ANNA 

SADIK-KHAN ORHAN I & KAREN 

SAGRISTANO GASPER F & THERESA 

SAILWAYS INC 

SAILWAYS INC 

SALADIN COMPUTER SYSTEMS INC 

SALATTO JAMES A 

S ALATTO JOSEPH L & M A YRANN 

SALCEJOHNJSR 

SALES ANTHONY V & LIDIA E 

SALING HENRY 

SALINGER STEPHEN & ELAINE B 

SALKA OFFICE FURNITURE 

SALVATION ARMY THE 

SALVATOREJOE 

SALVO VICTOR V 

SALZILLO ANTHONY & TERESA 

SAMEK MARK F 

SAMMARTINO EUGENE & CHRISTINE 

SAMUEL DAN J & HEATHER M 

SANDBANK HENRY & JUDITH 



FAIRFIELD CT, IND 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
PARAMAUS NJ, SUT 
NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 
WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
PROSPECT CT, CG 
MIDDLEFIELD CT, SUT 
ROCKY HILL CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
EAST HAVEN CT.CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT.CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
S WINDSOR CT, CG 
HOUSTON TX, CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
RYE BROOK NY, CG 
DANBURY CT, SUT 
KENSINGTON CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
MERIDENCT.CG 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 
DAYVILLE CT, SUT 
FLEETWOOD PA, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 
OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 
SAN FRANCISCO CA, SUT 
SAN FRANCISCO CA, SUT 
PRINCETON NJ, SUT 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
MADISON CT, CG 
MARCO FL, CG 
CHICOPEE MA, CG 
ROXBURYCT.CG 
HAMDEN CT, CG 
MERIDEN CT, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
WETHERSFIELD CT, IND 
WESTPORT CT, IND 
MILFORD CT, CG 
KENSINGTON CT, CG 
ANDOVERCT.CG 
WESTPORT CT.CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 



212.32 
333.30 

1,752.46 
405.06 
151.06 
307.91 
354.00 
705.76 
260.98 
479.66 
150.00 
215.90 
188.10 
143.25 
598.53 
100.44 
297.01 
114.50 
114.50 
108.95 

1,626.19 
112.20 
344.50 
101.90 
258.85 
921.12 
361.10 
183.87 
110.48 
235.08 
538.76 
447.48 
272.93 
144.49 

1,751.43 

1,123.91 
431.42 
619.10 
144.45 

2,540.68 
190.04 

1,984.68 

1,984.68 
425.40 
397.66 
394.52 
292.44 
143.36 
487.38 
104.36 
346.55 
313.79 
432.00 
220.50 
107.82 
135.13 

1,157.40 
149.31 

1.185.50 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



87 



5594693 860 S ANFORD EDWARD W & PEGGY M 

6396386000 SANOLTTECORP 

0442857960 SANSEVERINO DOMENICK A & PATRIC 

0360974 170 SANTA MARIA JOHN & EVELYN 

0443484670 SANTOLI MARILYN 

4776449000 SANWA LEASING CORPORATION 

0242843040 SARANGA MYRON & DORIS B 

0172414710 SARTORELLI ALAN C & ALICE A 

0866822000 SATELLITE AEROSPACE INC 

1129600000 SAUGATUCK FISH & GAME CLUB INC 

3276128000 SAVAGE ENGINEERING INC 

0726125001 SAVEWAY PETROLEUM INC 

0726125000 SAVEWAY PETROLEUM INC 

5424858000 SAVIN ROCK SEAFOOD INC 

0484202790 SBRIGLIO MARTIN & KAREN 

369844600 1 SCALES AIR COMPRESSOR CORP 

0473624690 SCALISE DONALD & PATRICA 

0423490670 SCALISE RICHARD T & CONSTANCE 

0123264390 SCANNELL THOMAS P & DIANE M 

5524863000 SCARPELLINOS COLLEGE STREET RES 

0493266940 SCARRTTT JAMES T & ELIZABETH H 

053 1 854 1 1 SCH ACHTER EDWARD & LUCY 

1643273520 SCHADE EDWARD P & JOANNE B 

382341 8930 SCHADT JAMES P & BARBARA S 

07934757 1 SCH AFFER MARK & CLAUDIA 

0405608150 SCHALLER ROBERT & CHERYL 

0460933030 SCHAPPA ROBERT E 

0493227090 SCHARR PAUL & GAIL 

0402481630 SCHEER BERNARD & LILLIAN 

0563407070 SCHETNHOLZ ARTHUR & IVY 

0532882600 SCHERR BRYNA L 

5774063060 SCHEUER ROBERT & GLOIRA 

1023082570 SCHEUR THOMAS 

0462485640 SCHIPUL JOSEPH & EMMA 

1072292810 SCHLESSEL THOEODORE & CARRTNE 

1 193625630 SCHLEY GERTRUDE 

4796249000 SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGIES INC 

0523809 100 SCHMIDT JOHN T & CAROLYN 

3612057400 SCHMITZ RICHARD C & JANET G 

1472891 140 SCHNAARS FREDERICK E & DORENA 

0450546190 SCHNABEL HAROLD W 

0903829170 SCHNATTTACHER PETER R & NANCY J 

3541634000 SCHNEIDER JOHN A & ELIZABETH 

5005847050 SCHNEIDER RICHARD S & COHEN DIA 

1 572279280 SCHNEIDER ROBERT M & CAROL W 

279 1 424000 SCHNEIDER SPECIALIZED CARRIERS 

0641247360 SCHNEIDM AN LORRAINE 

0594291000 SCHNIP BUILDING CO 

07 1 0608000 SCHOCK S AUTO BODY INC 

2163481440 SCHOLDER SHIRLEY 

0403891930 SCHOONOVER ALICE P 

05412821 10 SCHREIBER LEONARD I & BARBARA E 

0483433200 SCHRJJN JEAN & JOSEPHA M 

0424013500 SCHUCHMANN WILLIAM A & JEAN E 

0163282040 SCHULTZ MARTIN H & BEVERLY T 

1123645460 SCHUMACHER JOAN 

2790855000 SCHUMACK CONSTRUCTION CORP 

0646071020 SCHUR JACOB 

0716060090 SCHUR KYRA 



WESTON CT.CG 182.72 

BROOKLYN NY, SUT 1 19.24 

STAMFORD CT, CG 11 4.62 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 1 13.85 

WATERBURY CT, CG 269.79 

ROCHESTER MI, SUT 1,216.14 

STAMFORD CT, CG 102.70 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 125.69 

MANCHESTER CT, SUT 163.67 

FAIRFIELD CT, ADC 165.00 

BLOOMFIELD CT, SUT 290.23 

DANIELSONCT.SUT 398.01 

DANIELSONCT.SUT 849.40 

ORANGE CT, SUT 670.99 

MONROE CT.CG 119.90 

WALLINGFORD CT, SUT 951.21 

STAMFORD CT, CG 570.65 

WESTPORT CT, CG 423.32 

AVONCT.CG 110.82 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 3 1 5.55 

BRISTOL CT.CG 138.69 

STAMFORD CT, CG 454.39 

RTDGEFIELD CT, CG 290.86 

WESTPORT CT, CG 179.91 

WESTBROOK CT, CG 1 12.94 

BERLIN CT.CG 115.45 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 179.32 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 319.18 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 320.06 

NAPLES FL.CG 1,984.25 

BRANFORD CT, CG 419.54 

GREENWICH CT, CG 145.01 

GREENWICH CT, CG 176.48 

STRATFORD CT, CG 330.29 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 177.80 

NEW YORK NY, CG 144.16 

SIMI VALLEY CA, SUT 13,025.67 

DARIENCT.CG 190.98 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 ,097.38 

WATERBURY CT, CG 208.27 

HARTFORD CT, CG 437.75 

WOODSTOCK CT, CG 1 1 3.78 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 373.03 

STAMFORD CT, CG 289. 15 

OLD LYME CT.CG 165.42 

GREENB AY WI, MC 143.24 

GREENWICH CT, CG 4,369. 49 

NORWICH CT, SUT 844.34 

STRATFORD CT, SUT 237.75 

N HAVEN CT.CG 442.79 

HARTFORD CT, CG 369.08 

WESTPORT CT, CG 986.98 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 63 1.62 

ANSONIACT.CG 137.24 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 198. 16 

GREENWICH CT, CG 584.23 

CLINTON CT, SUT 597.61 

GREENWICH CT, CG 529.02 

PORT CHESTER NY CG 534.69 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0646059150 
0441649180 
1282424280 
0961646510 
0490584080 
1102866350 
1 122629420 
0422225800 
0721820460 
6033674000 
6083638000 
0994277000 
3803201310 
0071835050 
2032898310 
0983228770 
0442050370 
0585778000 
0746339000 
0473233780 
0492431890 
0613612000 
0882664350 
5636245700 
6503296000 
6125405000 
6125405000 
0533293810 
5144457260 
3929163730 
3929163730 
0482628370 
2651098420 
0063033250 
1472649170 
0980183030 
0434076730 
0702023500 
0492048960 
1272492530 
1272492530 
1485019160 
1082088130 
6668537000 
2124470470 
0443261630 
1192467040 
5576210000 
0472088700 
1292631680 
0312850640 
3330677000 
3330677000 
0841932000 
0672655810 
1871434350 
1201834910 
0471812290 
0412038850 



SCHURSKYLAR 
SCHWANFELDER WILLIAM 
SCHWARTZ ARNOLD & MYNA 
SCHWARTZ HOWARD A 
SCHWARTZ JAMES P & NATALIE P 
SCHWARTZ MARC D & ANNE B 
SCHWARTZMAN ALLAN J & LOIS P 
SCHWARTZMAN NORMAN & ROZLYN 
SCHWIMMER ROBERT & ELIZABETH A 



PORT CHESTER NY 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
HIGHLAND BEACH FL 
EASTON CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 



CG 



CG 



SCOBAR ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS I W HARTFORD CT, SUT 



SCOFIELD GERALDINE 
SCOTRICK CORPORATION 
SCOTT GEORGE M 
SCOTT S SPENCER JR 
SCOTT WALTER A & MARY C 
SCOTT WALTER O & CAROLYN 
SCOVEL EDWARD S & GLADYS D 
SCRANTON MOTORS INC 



NEW YORK NY, BU 
PORTLAND CT, GAS 
STORRS CT, CG 
LYME CT, CG 

PEMBROKE BERMUDA, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
ESSEX CT, CG 
VERNON CT, SUT 



SCRANTON SALES OF NEW HAVEN INC WOODBRIDGE CT, SUT 



SCRIVENER ROBERT & LINDA 

SCULLY ELEANOR W 

SEAPORT MARINE INC 

SEARS JOHN A 

SEA VER GEORGE T & NANCY L 

SEBOLT FRANK O 

SECOND ALARM RESTAURANT 

SECOND ALARM RESTAURANT 

SECREST GLENN J & ELLEN B 

SECRESTVICKIJ 

SECURITY CAPITAL CREDIT CORPORA 

SECURITY CAPITAL CREDIT CORPORA 

SEDER WALTER & MARLENE 

SEEMANN GEORGE H & KATE J 

SEGER ROLAND E & EILEEN S 

SEIDMAN SAMUEL & HERTA 

SEIPT RICHARD 

SELIGMAN STEVEN L & CATHERINE C 

SELLMAN NILS D & VIRGINIA P 

SELTENREICH WILLIAM E & NORMA J 

SEMEL MORTON & SANDRA 

SEMEL MORTON & SANDRA 

SENA KANAGA N & THELAGA N 

SENDAK MAURICE 

SENIOR ENGINEERING CO 

SENKER EDWARD G & ROCHELLE B 

SERBIN ROBERT J & MARY A 

SERMAN JEROLD W & ANNERUTH 

SERVICE MASTER OF WILLTMANTIC 

SESTERO NORMA V 

SHAFF GERALD H & CAROLE A 

SHALOV JEANETTE 

SHAMROCK DISTRIBUTORS INC 

SHAMROCK DISTRIBUTORS INC 



MARLBOROUGH CT, CG 
POMPANO BEACH FL, CG 
MYSTIC CT, CORP 
E GRANBY CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
W HARTFORD CT, SUT 
NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 
NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 
NEWPORT RI , CG 
DARIEN CT.CG 
GLASTONBURY CT, UN INS 
GLASTONBURY CT, UN INS 
NORWICH CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
NORTH BRANFORD CT, CG 
BLOOMFIELDCT.CG 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
STRATFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
NEW YORK NY, CG 
LOS ANGELES CA, CORP 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
SOUTHINGTONCT.CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
SOUTH WINDHAM CT, SUT 
GLASTONBURY CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
PROVIDENCE RI, SUT 
PROVIDENCE RI, CORP 
STAMFORD CT, CORP 



SHAMROCK MAINTENANCE CORP 
SHANAHAN THOMAS E & ELIZABETH CSOMERS CT, CG 
SHANBROM ARNOLD & ARLENE NEW HAVEN CT, CG 

SHANSKY ALBERT & PEARL B NORWALK CT, CG 

SHARNICK AMBROSE STRATFORD CT, CG 

SHARP ENA HARATFORD CT, CG 



527.14 
184.51 
425.60 
290.72 
120.88 
125.66 
361.60 
1 17.20 
189.40 

1,818.72 
463.59 

1,245.11 
171.44 

1,285.48 
796.70 
460.53 

1,302.78 

6,119.49 
163.91 
104.90 
446.60 
217.90 
274.85 

1,188.08 
116.77 
129.60 
115.20 
361.44 
105.77 
600.00 
600.00 
754.46 

5,031.40 
208.39 
618.20 
166.68 
144.06 
129.37 
289.79 
178.33 
178.33 
142.60 
457.40 

1,863.00 
186.60 
124.12 
313.67 
173.99 
237.00 
120.40 
387.76 
141.00 
141.00 
632.70 
357.30 
464.70 
313.07 
500.55 
217.58 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



89 



3694029380 SHARP WARREN D & PATRICIA J 

0441827100 SHARR EDWARD J & KATHRYN C 

1242023 150 SHAVELL STEVEN S & PATRICIA A 

1242023150 SHAVELL STEVEN S & PATRICIA A 

0452061760 SHAW GLENN K & MARY A 

2743 884390 SHAW RICHARD K & JANE 

3273214610 SHAY JOHN W & MARY T 

0302251000 SHEA EDWARD & CHARLOTTE 

1705216940 SHEA JAMES E & INA E 

0423600740 SHEA WILLIAM B & MARY W 

1801222770 SHEBLE RICHARD N & DOROTHY E 

3163237410 SHEEHAN BERNARD F & RHEDA M 

1 272463 850 SHEEHAN CHARLES V & SUS AN R 

637953 1 000 SHEEPHILL TREE SERVICE 

6226906000 SHEESH MAHAL 

0573438820 SHEHADI WILLIAM H & RUTH L 

6297535000 SHEILAS KITCHEN 

0563 880460 SHELTON EDWARD K & AMY M 

0483617910 SHENKER BENJAMIN M & EDNA R 

0491073670 SHERMAN GEORGE J & LOTLTE K 

1202816660 SHERMAN WARREN T & CAROLYN 

0012405500 SHEVZOV THEODORE J & NINA 

4441422650 SHIELD VIRGINIA L 

1111677480 SHIELDS BERNARD W & BETTY W 

1316807760 SHINE DAVID B & SHINE 

3008422000 SHIP N SHORE SPIRIT SHOPPE INC 

3825498480 SHORE ALMO L 

0514091000 SHORE AND COUNTRY CLUB INC 

0134981000 SHORELINE CAFE 

6786289000 SHORELINE PIANO INC 

043 1244780 SHOW AH SAMUEL M 

0651254050 SHRIRO RUTH G 

3181477120 SHUFRO ARNOLD D 

0453865090 SHULMAN REBECCA 

0453865090 SHULMAN REBECCA 

101301 1370 SHULOF GEORGE & MICHELENE A 

0113465240 SIA CHO LU & ANNA 

5923867000 SIBS LAWN SERVICE 

1 684690480 SIDE Y IAN M & CHRISTINA W 

0494055420 SIEBERT LAWRENCE A 

0493045500 SIKORSKI FRANCIS & PATRICIA 

051263 1650 SILBERSTEIN CHARLES K & SUSAN G 

05 1 263 1 650 SILBERSTEIN CHARLES K & SUS AN G 

0431692430 SILEO V F & MILDRED 

0444095200 SILKOFF ALAN & CHERYL G 

0472816130 SILVER ALAN E & SHIRLEY 

5122783000 SILVER LANES 

7777114887 SILVER ROBERT 

0645036000 SILVERMAN ENTERPRISES INC 

0431417580 SILVERMAN GEORGE E & BEVERLY 

1282459170 SILVERSTEIN STANLEY M 

1193611110 SILVERSTONE DAVID E & LINDA T 

0422852730 SILVESTER MICHAEL J & LOUISE 

4973970000 SILVESTER TAFURO DESIGN INCORPO 

040 1 447460 SILVESTRI VINCENT 

3 193455000 SIMCO HEATING & FUEL INCORPORAT 

3 193455000 SIMCO HEATING & FUEL INCORPORAT 

3 193455000 SIMCO HEATING & FUEL INCORPORAT 

3 193455000 SIMCO HEATING & FUEL INCORPORAT 

0553859280 SIMON MARIAN F 



RAPID CITY MI, CG 158.43 

PORTLAND CT, CG 480.20 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 ,04 1 . 88 

WESTPORT CT, CG 916.91 

DANBUR Y CT, CG 1 92.29 

NORTH HAVEN CT, CG 1 67.59 

NORFOLK CT, CG 106.00 

TRUMBULL CT, CG 283.80 

STAMFORD CT, CG 125.39 

GREENWICH CT, CG 599.05 

ESSEX CT, CG 335.58 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 217.02 

VERO BE ACH FL, CG 978. 1 6 

NO 6736706000, SUT 534.39 

WESTPORT CT, SUT 241.91 

GREENWICH CT, CG 263.98 

WALLTNGFORD CT, SUT 176.08 

DAREN CT.CG 211.38 

MJDDLETOWN CT, CG 164.61 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 452.98 

DANBURY CT, CG 199.69 

WINCHESTER VA, CG 1 13.31 

MONROE CT, CG 100.41 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 1 2.20 

STAMFORD CT, CG 558.48 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, SUT 107. 15 

WESTPORT CT, CG 622.09 

NORWALK CT, SUT 888.47 

WESTON CT, SUT 216.87 

NO 6677363000, SUT 174.43 

DANBURY CT, CG 216.80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 401.21 

WESTPORT CT, CG 197.96 

NEW YORK NY, CG 853.40 

NEW YORK NY, CG 415.10 

WILTON CT, CG 266.04 

STAMFORD CT, CG 140.38 

EASTON CT, SUT 170.56 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 132.61 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 60. 33 

W HAVEN CT.CG 119.76 

GREENWICH CT, CG 3,399.05 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 ,278.68 

STAMFORD CT, CG 176. 10 

EASTON CT.CG 861.06 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 173.61 

RICHMOND VA, SUT 5,657.76 

BRIDGEPORT CT, IND 168.75 

NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 138.60 

BOCA RATON FL, CG 290. 40 

STRATFORD CT, CG 1 44. 84 

WOODBRIDGE CT, CG 158.99 

BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 171.10 

S NORWALK CT, CORP 503. 14 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 584. 19 

NEW HAVEN CT, MF 664.77 

NEW HAVEN CT, MF 696.79 

NEW HAVEN CT, MF 927. 1 1 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 201.93 

STAMFORD CT, CG 101.00 



90 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



1 193646460 
0442264410 
5824800000 
1433801990 
0673288380 
0194221400 
0464898510 
0640700400 
1039965000 
0971645850 
7777113126 
0471855170 
0778456001 
0778456000 
0411631240 
0444078860 
1011615290 
1302411730 
5791839790 
5640362000 
5784067380 
0423251630 
5695666130 
0481466800 
2277423900 
3664253140 
0451882650 
0983416590 
0473261000 
6362628000 
0182448130 
5362397000 
6352900000 
6149751000 
1252650810 
0462073220 
0903276460 
0983878800 
5504823320 
0491852430 
0482006630 
0463828950 
5729959000 
5729959000 
5729959000 
0402638940 
0423477760 
2053655720 
6468722000 
6398820000 
5690508000 
3253080130 
1092488820 
4669040001 
4236048000 
4722484000 
0841817000 
5228051000 
4426383000 
0483684900 



SIMON MARK & PENELOPE I 
SIMONE JAMES & SUSANNA JR 
SIMPLEX TIME RECORDER CO 
SIMPSON KENNETH H & FOUCHE W 
SINCLAIR JAMES & BARBARA 
SISE RICHARD & MARGARET C 
SISK BRAND & DONNA L 
SISKIND DAVID & DEBORAH S 



BRANFORD CT, CG 
SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 
GARDNER MA, SUT 
DARIENCT.CG 
SHARON CT.CG 
NORTH FRANKLIN CT, CG 
OLD LYME CT, CG 
SOUTHBURY CT, CG 



SKAARUP CHARTERING CORPORATIONGREENWICH CT, CORP 



SKAARUP OLE & GERDA 

SKARTVEDT JUDITH STROMMEN 

SKELTE EDWARD 

SKI LOFT 

SKI LOFT INC 

SKINDZIER BERNARD & VICTORIA 

SKOURAS SPYROS S JR & VICTORIA 

SLAGLE CHARLES 

SLATER NELSON & BRENDA 

SLAUGHTER HERBERT H JR & NORMA 

SLB DESIGN 

SMILOW JOEL E & JOAN L 

SMITH ALFRED J 

SMITH DALE E & SHARON L 

SMITH DURYEA D & LOIS A 

SMITH HERBERT M & DIANA K 

SMITH LELAND R & GLORIA 

SMITH LINDSLEY 

SMITH RONALD T & LINDA G 

SMITH TYLER & DIANE B 

SMITHY 

SMOKLER LEONARD 

SMT LANDSCAPING 

SMW SYSTEMS 

SNAXX PLUS 

SNYDER NATHAN & GERALDINE W 

SOBIN STURGIS & MADELINE 

SOBOL BRUCE DR & BARBARA 

SOLOMON GRAY 

SOLOMON PETER & SALLY 

SOLTZ LESTER 

SOLTZ SEYMOUR 

SOMERS HENRIETTA W 

SONIC PERCEPTIONS INC 

SONIC PERCEPTIONS INC 

SONIC PERCEPTIONS INC 

SORRENTTNO JAMES V & PENELOPE 

SOSKIN DAVID H & JANET M 

SOTZING STEPHEN P & JANET J 

SOUP SHOPP INC 

SOUTHGATE LABRADORS 

SOUTHSIDE PACKAGE STORE 

SOVEY KATHRYNE 

SPAIN JOHN P 

SPARKS TUNE UP 

SPARTAN CHEMICAL CO INC 

SPAZZARINI CONSTRUCTION CO INC 



GREENWICH CT, CG 
EASTON CT, IND 
BRISTOL CT, CG 
GROTONCT.SUT 
GROTON CT, SUT 
GALES FERRY CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
COSCOBCT.CG 
TACONIC CT, CG 
VIRGINIA BEACH VA, CG 
MARLBOROUGH CT, SUT 
GREEN FARMS CT, CG 
SOUTHBURY CT, CG 
WILMINGTON NC CG 
COSCOBCT.CG 
NEW CANAAN CT.CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
SOUTHPORTCT.CG 
DANBURYCT.CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
MONROE CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
MIDDLETOWN CT, SUT 
SANTA FE SPRINGS CA, CORP 
OXFORD CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
ANSONIA CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 
BROOKFIELD CT, CG 
WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW LONDON CT.CG 
NEW LONDON CT, CG 
WALLINGFORD CT, CG 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
WILTON CT, CG 
DARIEN CT, CG 
OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 
HAMDEN CT, SUT 
SOUTHPORTCT,SUT 
NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
DARIENCT.CG 
S WINDSOR CT, SUT 
TOLEDO OH, SUT 
ENFIELD CT, SUT 
GAYLORDSVILLE CT, SUT 



SPECIALTIES UNLIMITED 
SPECIALTY HOMES OF GLASTONBURY BEND OR, CORP 
SPECIALTY TILE DAYVILLE CT, SUT 

SPELLACY ELIZABETH GILL W HARTFORD CT. CG 



133.60 
130.96 
499.81 
328.48 
536.14 
107.55 
222.93 
125.49 

1,648.00 

1,389.66 
118.44 
109.33 
146.11 
146.11 
124.87 
953.46 
169.21 
244.00 
107.84 
214.86 

1,080.51 
184.77 
322.92 
383.97 
719.53 
256.63 
208.76 
164.80 
117.77 
328.70 
348.20 
267.56 
424.00 

1,070.86 
458.44 
154.50 
176.60 

1,243.50 
251.97 
266.89 
132.30 
892.34 
296.75 
412.24 
154.17 
249.02 

1,008.40 
201.80 
118.17 
183.60 
610.35 
579.66 

2,464.00 
276.22 
866.60 
193.16 
263.80 
310.10 
155.18 
674.77 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



91 



1331632010 
0533493670 
0470141890 
0452241900 
6403307000 
6403307000 
4932174000 
4759874000 
0404288740 
0404288740 
5616222765 
0529958000 
0423641530 
2590636000 
0845784000 
0402401630 
4760930000 
4760930000 
3453496480 
5225863370 
5694930000 
5694930000 
5694930000 
5694930000 
5694930000 
5694930000 
5694930000 
5694930000 
0453073440 
0433623540 
0859488765 
3368586000 
0571042200 
0302881490 
1012061800 
4764896400 
4764896400 
5434699470 
0473808780 
0783803070 
4682084000 
7787710162 
0432209890 
0792644760 
0454692660 
4776308000 
1433426100 
0442671710 
5863022000 
3293475250 
0933459220 
0936039000 
2824227200 
1231632870 
6126528000 
0562666440 
5601284260 
1563489470 
5006046730 
0421224810 



SPIEGEL DANIEL & MARIANNE 
SPIELBERG DAVID H & DIANNA L 
SPIRT S BURTON & MAY 
SPONZO FRANK J & PATRICIA B 
SPRINGDALE PIZZA RESTAURANT 
SPRINGDALE PIZZA RESTAURANT 
SPRINGFIELD LUMBER CO INC 
SST AUTO PARTS INC 
ST JOHN BARBARA 
ST JOHN BARBARA 
ST PAUL GUARDIAN INSURANCE CO 
ST PAULS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
STABNICK RICHARD T & CHERYL J 
STAFFORD ELECTRIC INC 
STAMFORD DATA PROCESSING CORP 
STAMOS JOHN & GRACE M 
STANDARD PAPER & MDSE CO INC 
STANDARD PAPER & MDSE CO INC 
STANTON ROBERT H & ELIZABETH H 



TACONIC CT, CG 
E HAVEN CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
SPRINGFIELD MA, SUT 
BRONX NY, CORP 
COLLTNSVILLE CT, CG 
COLLINSVILLE CT, CG 
ST PAUL MN, F&NR 
DARIEN CT, SUT 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
STAFFORD SPRINGS CT, SUT 
BEACON FALLS CT, CORP 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
SPRINGFIELD MA, SUT 
SPRINGFIELD MA, SUT 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 



STAPLETON CRAIG R & DOROTHY W 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STAR HARDWARE & PLUMBING SUPPL HARTFORD CT, SUT 
STARK HENRY & CHER POWELL ROCKY HILL CT, CG 

STARZECPYZEL EILEEN R NEW YORK NY, CG 

STATE FARM MUTUAL AUTO INS CO BLOOMINGTON IL, F&NR 
STATE STREET DEVELOPMENT MANAG BOSTON MA, SUT 



STAVOLA FRANCIS J 

STCLAIR JOSEPH V & JEAN L 

STEADLY HARVEY & EVELYN G 

STEDMANJOELD 

STEDMAN JOEL D 

STEEN TORE & MARY JANE 

STEIER MARK S & PATRICIA A 

STEIN MICHAEL & JANET 

STETNBACH INC 

STEINBERG GERALD 

STEINBERG HAROLD & SYBIL 

STEINBERG RICHARD A & JUDITH A 

STETNHARDT MARK & BARBARA 

STELCAR PHOTOGRAPHY INC 

STEMMER WAYNE J & BARBARA J 

STENGEL ROBERT F & JOYCE A 

STEPFORD GROUP 

STEPHAN ROBERT M & JUDITH S 

STERN STEVEN M 

STETSON TRADING & MANAGEMENT 

STEUERT JOSEPH & VARTNA 

STEVENS HEAMAN H 

STEVES CAR & AUDIO 

STEWART ALLAN N & CLAIRE M 

STEWART CHARLES 

STIER STEVAN A & FRANCINE 

STIFFELMAN ROBERT B & JODIE E 

STIGLIANO DANIEL T & EMMA P 



HARTFORD CT, CG 
SOUTHINGTON CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT.CG 
IVORYTON CT, CG 
IVORYTON CT, CG 
PORTLAND OR, CG 
GOSHEN CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
W HARTFORD CT, IND 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
E HARTFORD CT, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
ROCKY HTLLCT.CG 
WESTPORT CT, SUT 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
NEW FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
SOUTHPORT CT, CORP 
DARIEN CT.CG 
WILLIMANTIC CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, SUT 
EASTON CT, CG 
ROXBURY CT, CG 
WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
DEERFIELD BEACH FL, CG 



547.19 
277.13 
388.47 
307.00 
230.40 
291.41 
648.32 

1,271.03 
999.02 
892.53 

6,877.30 
328.83 
348.74 
246.78 
367.50 
220.28 
196.85 
428.32 
388.58 

2,000.88 
550.79 
659.07 
606.08 
684.15 
596.24 
611.23 
546.61 
542.87 
108.41 
16,931.60 
111.77 

8,679.76 

1,500.60 
341.90 
115.37 
137.83 
164.00 
860.07 
166.41 
577.60 

5,604.55 

1,218.94 
418.50 
680.91 
328.13 
241.93 
503.44 
217.77 
393.68 
105.64 
229.58 
275.00 
311.52 
200.00 
133.74 
171.45 
534.10 
176.59 
111.72 
135.08 



92 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



0642087890 STTTZER CARL & RITA 

0820948240 STJOHN CATHERINE 

067 1 503000 STOLLS DRUG STORE INC 

5425052030 STONE CHARLES L & SARA S 

047364 1 900 STONE FREDERICK & SHARON 

0463813500 STONE LOUIS & SUSAN 

0442864970 STONEHILL ROBERT J & CARLYN 

08303 1 9530 STOUT DEAN P & FRANCES B 

1 273070750 STRACKS RICHARD & JOAN 

0483048550 STRAIN WILLIAM N & JACQUELINE I 

0463013470 STRANO FRANK 

04501 10890 STRATTON FRANK M & MARGARET N 

4528221 170 STRAUB CLAUDE W & DONNA J JR 

0960565860 STRAUB FRANK & LAURA 

7777 1 1 4529 STRAUSS STEVEN J 

3973855240 STRECKBEIN RONALD G & DAVID E 

0403020390 STROBEL REAVES E 

0983808840 STUARRT RONALD M & ALICE M 

2326834070 STUART LENNOX E & MARJORIE A 

4694260670 STUCKI ROBERT E 

0573485000 STUDIO OF ING JOHN INCORPORATED 

5965983000 SUBWAY BOULEVARD SHOP 

1271602900 SUCHMAN ELAINE M 

041 1095 120 SUGDEN JOSEPH & MARIE 

5625280000 SULLIVAN & LESH ANE INC 

0562660000 SULLIVAN LIQUORS STORE 

0741209180 SULLIVAN WALTER S& MARY B 

5201496003 SUNGLASS HUT DANBURY FAIR MALL 

520 1 496002 SUNGLASS HUT OF TRUMBULL SHOPPI 

6058689000 SUNRISE FAMILY RESTAURANT 

6393813000 SUNRISE SOUND SYSTEMS 

483 1 939000 SUPERIOR OFFICE SUPPLY INC 

6393 193000 SUPERIOR PRODUCTS MANUFACTUR 

6393 193000 SUPERIOR PRODUCTS MANUFACTUR 

6393 193000 SUPERIOR PRODUCTS MANUFACTUR 

6393 193000 SUPERIOR PRODUCTS MANUFACTUR 

5308184000 SUSANS HALLMARK SHOP 

0591282540 SUSS FLORENCE 

0473094030 SUSSMAN STANLEY & JANICE 

0704000170 SUTHERS MARKLEY R & MELINDA J 

1 38287 1 340 SUTTON JOHN T & CATHERINE 

0461221210 SUTULA FRANK P & SOMA M 

5 1 17569000 S VEDALA INDUSTRIES INC 

0483005800 SWANCHAK GRACE L 

1 652672 170 SWARTZ WILLIAM E & VIRGINIA N 

3883686360 SWEENEY MOLLY 

0482685790 SWEENEY WILSON F & MARGO W 

103 1272100 SZEKERES JANOS & ERNA 

103 1272100 SZEKERES JANOS & ERNA 

7777116141 SZENTKUTIVUA 

0461 4401 1 SZYMANSKI FRANCIS 

0461440110 SZYMANSKI FRANCIS 

6678809000 T L C LAWN SERVICE 

4708343000 T R MILLER CO INC 

0873810000 TACK ROOM THE 

0482089170 TANGUAY JOHN & BARBARA 

1 422877830 TANNENB AUM ALAN & BETH 

2834680330 TANNER CHERYL A 

0923085890 TARNOWSKI ANDREW & THERESA 

0173294700 TARTAGLIA REMO & SEBASTIAN A NEL 



WESTPORT CT.CG 
N HAVEN CT.CG 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
MERIDENCT.CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
ESSEX CT, CG 
ROXBURY CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
MANCHESTER CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT.CG 
WESTON CT, CG 
CHESTER CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, IND 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
DEEP RIVER CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT.CG 
DARIENCT.CG 
HARTFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
COLUMBIA CT, SUT 
RIVERSIDE CT.CG 
BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT, SUT 
WATERBURY CT, SUT 
RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
MIAMI FL, SUT 
MIAMI FL, SUT 
GRANBY CT, SUT 
THOMASTON CT, SUT 
NEWTOWN CT, SUT 
ST PAUL MN, SUT 
ST PAUL MN, SUT 
ST PAUL MN, SUT 
ST PAUL MN, SUT 
NEW YORK NY, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
MILFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
BELGRADE ME, CG 
W SUFFIELD CT, CG 
MILWAUKEE WI, CORP 
E HAVEN CT, CG 
CRANBURY NJ, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
BRANFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
RIDGEFIELD CT, IND 
NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 
NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
NEEDHAM MA, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, SUT 
BRISTOL CT, CG 
HARTFORD CT.CG 
CANTON CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
WILTON CT, CG 



138.40 
227.40 
661.38 

1,574.23 
202.13 
125.65 
584.36 
179.27 
302.76 
100.40 
356.39 
171.48 
141.89 
140.61 
207.07 

1,070.98 
104.14 

2,754.63 
167.80 

2,631.20 
274.02 
300.00 
116.46 
130.95 

1,317.76 
340.32 
413.45 
457.80 
217.62 
354.06 
246.49 
622.11 

1,065.41 
882.86 
749.74 
902.96 
364.20 
144.81 
168.32 

1,056.55 
162.79 
157.72 
370.90 
113.40 
170.50 
205.10 
114.74 

1,851.67 
694.40 
239.63 
278.17 
455.11 
127.51 
301.30 
561.25 
382.24 
281.88 
226.10 
285.02 
505.82 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



93 



0081062810 TASKER DEANE C & JEAN J 

4427167000 TASTE OF ASIA 

048327921 TAT ALIAS PETER & CAROL 

1391838790 TATEOSIAN GEORGE P & DENISE P 

1572204160 TAUCK ARTHUR C JR & LEE A 

0414078310 TAYLOR AUDREY A 

0473844510 TAYLOR EDITH D 

1313271380 TAYLOR GEORGE H & CATHERINE 

5356035000 TEAM COMPUTER BAY 

6478267000 TEAM MANAGEMENT INC 

4800546000 TECCO INC 

5222716000 TECHSTAR 

0403604460 TEDFORD FREDERICK B & BETTE ANN 

0427062460 TEHRANI AHMAD & PA VENEH 

6398887000 TELEDATA COMMUNICATIONS INC 

27 1 6884000 TEMPLE COMPUTER ASSOCIATES 

2716884000 TEMPLE COMPUTER ASSOCIATES 

2315212480 TENCH ORRENK 

0493095650 TERLIZZI ALEXANDER J & JUDITH 

6459440000 TERRACE CLUB 

4974049750 THEOBALD KAREN M 

4974049750 THEOBALD KAREN M 

4974049750 THEOBALD KAREN M 

1 8 1 2045440 THESEN NICHOLAS F & MILDRED M 

6105183000 THIBODEAU MAINTENANCE SERVICES 

6105183000 THIBODEAU MAINTENANCE SERVICES 

6105183000 THIBODEAU MAINTENANCE SERVICES 

6105183000 THIBODEAU MAINTENANCE SERVICES 

6105183000 THIBODEAU MAINTENANCE SERVICES 

0451464520 THOELE ROGER H & MARIE 

0881405160 THOMAS STANLEY G & MORRIS ANITA 

0851065960 THOMAS WALTER M 

5251335001 THOMPSON FLOWER & GIFTS 

1 083443680 THOMPSON JAMES P & NANCY P 

7777112573 THOMPSON SCOTT 

1 161249240 THOMSON GEORGIA K 

1 163258430 THOMSON JOHN D G & BARBARA A 

1 163258430 THOMSON JOHN D G & BARBARA A 

2582283620 THORNE WILLIAMA & HARRIETTE C 

4752826780 THORSEN THOMAS O & CAROLYN K 

0472035650 THRALL SHIRLIE C 

5194239390 THUNE ARNE & ENSAF 

2624845770 TIBBETTS GUNHTLD 

0413435400 TIBBLES KENNETH M & LILLIAN R 

6516140000 TIDEL ENGINEERING INC 

0452436500 TIERNEY ESTHER 

0173681170 TILDEN MARION W 

0463039030 TILDEN RONALD P & FRANCES B 

561 2379762 TIME INSURANCE COMPANY 

0405080240 TIMM DOUGLAS & MELTNDA C 

0779710000 TITANIUM METALS CORP 

0779710000 TITANIUM METALS CORP 

0562253200 TOLMICH HERBERT & SONIA 

1151 832630 TOMBERG MARTIN W & GAIL 

3388923000 TONY JRS DISCOUNT AUTO SALES 

4048906000 TOP DRAWER 

4048906000 TOP DRAWER 

1 122463680 TOPLIN IRVING & BARBARA L 

0403079970 TORELLO WILLIAM & CLARE 

6435507000 TORREY COMPANY INC 



BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 103.85 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 423. 88 

WOODBURY CT, CG 1 14.91 

SUN CITY CENTER FL, CG 264. 86 

WESTPORT CT, CG 14,828.13 

DARIENCT.CG 1,216.32 

HARTFORD CT, CG 4,017.79 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 1 08.76 

N HAVEN CT, SUT 1 ,000.60 

LINCOLN RI, SUT 809.62 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 13 1.87 

GROTON CT, SUT 363.44 

S GLASTONBURY CT, CG 175.00 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 224. 87 

BAY SHORE NY, SUT 420.69 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 720. 16 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 1,108.40 

WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 224. 80 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, CG 589.91 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 1 ,064.30 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 648.35 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 736.50 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 1 ,777.90 

DANBUR Y CT, CG 1 36.06 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 332.03 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 555.62 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 4 1 6.30 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 712.10 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 645.70 

WESTPORT CT, CG 131.23 

STAMFORD CT, CG 294.91 

GREENWICH CT, CG 347.00 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 244. 10 

F ARMINGTON CT, CG 1 70. 80 

BRISTOL CT.IND 221.88 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 2,063.53 
PETERBOROUGH ON CANADA, CG 283.50 
PETERBOROUGH ON CANADA, CG 1 13.12 

DARIENCT.CG 123.09 

WESTON CT.CG 137.48 

MANCHESTER CT, CG 208. 1 8 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 424.52 

GREENWICH CT, CG 169.44 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 426. 15 

CARROLLTON TX, SUT 232.58 

WALLTNGFORD CT, CG 123.76 

BOSTON MA CG 330.60 

BRISTOL CT.CG 124.10 

MILWAUKEE WI, F&NR 5,805.47 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 901.98 

DENVER CO, CORP 1 17.70 

DENVER CO, CORP 48 1 .28 

NORW ALK CT, CG 1 22.77 

COS COB CT, CG 973.98 

WATERBURY CT, SUT 259.28 

SOMERS CT, SUT 309.90 

SOMERS CT, SUT 309.90 

WEST REDDING CT, CG 1 97. 80 

HAMDENCT.CG 189.17 

NATICK MA, SUT 664.45 



94 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



4622445000 TORRINGFORD PACKAGE STORE 

2172500000 TORRINGTON TOYOTA INC 

043 1 899440 TOTH CHARLES J & DORIS E 

040247 1110 TOUT ANT ROLAND & HELENE 

0630186000 TOWN FAIR TIRE CENTER 

2217990000 TOWN HALL HARDWARE INC 

6271381000 TOWN LINE TAS INC 

4613337000 TOWNE LIQUOR STORE 

4654804100 TOWNSEND DAVID G & HELEN G 

09 1 6304000 TP A DESIGN GROUP 

4763835000 TRADITIONAL EQUINET BUSINESS CO 

3656048000 TREEHOUSE CAFE INC 

0452802360 TREFZ CHRISTINA J 

0452802360 TREFZ CHRISTINA J 

0412492230 TREMAINE EMILY HALL EST OF 

566001 4000 TRI STAR PLASTICS CORP 

5660014000 TRI STAR PLASTICS CORP 

0804195000 TRINK ET SHOPPE ETC ETC ETC INC 

0442695730 TROMPETTA SAMUEL J & BEATRICE M 

0422443760 TROVARELLI JOSEPH J & ANN V 

5361803000 TRUCK TIRE SERVICE CORP 

6214449000 TRUMBULL MARRIOTT HOTEL 

0427416710 TRYGG STEVE L & KARIN M 

5036256000 TSCHEBULL ANTIQUE CARPETS 

1061834950 TUCCIMARY 

5674734000 TUCKER ASSOCIATES 

0482025410 TUCKER RICHARD F & GENEVIEVE M 

0061475370 TUCKER WILLIAM E 

1293025700 TUMPOSWKY IRA B & AUDREY F 

08003645 1 TUR ANO FRANCIS F & LILLIAN 

128341 1680 TURETSKY HOWARD B 

3762811700 TURNEY AUSTIN H & RUTH A 

0464471240 TURRO THOMAS J 

0493464860 TWARDY CHARLES W & ELAINE 

044 1 624270 TWEEDY RICHARD B & JOAN O 

3303781000 TWIN PINES DINER 

0484065970 TYLER KELVIN & KAREN 

0892808550 TYNAN MARTHA A 

0872878040 TYNAN WILLIAM G & MARIE A 

0412234760 TYROL GRAHAM E & GERTRUDE P 

0684720000 UNION CAMP CORPORATION 

6210215000 UNION LABOR DIRECTORIES CT LABO 

3 170479000 UNITED AVIONICS INC 

5612445762 UNITED OLYMPIC LIFE INSURANCE 

4749826000 UNITED STATES AUDIO VISUALS 

0943286330 URSTADT JAMES J & SUSAN P 

4474987000 US PANEL PRODUCTS INC 

0483804720 USHER ALICE S 

04524275 1 USTANOWSKI ANTHONY & ELIZABETH 

0520940000 V P WINTER DISTRIBUTING CO 

049 1 625640 V AL JOHN & ADA 

3673033390 VANBRIMER RUSSELL H & JANE W 

0850559460 VANDEVENTER FRANCES & AUDRIE 

0772643960 VANHAASTEREN GERARDUS J & MARJ 

1502607130 VANHOESEN EVERET H & ALICE L 

1 08 1 446870 V ANWINKLE CHARLOTTE S 

0052026380 VARDAMIS GEORGE A & ANTOINETTE 

2924223920 VARGA GEORGE J & LAURI A JR 

2924223920 VARGA GEORGE J & LAURI A JR 



TORRINGTON CT, SUT 493.44 

TORRINGTON CT, SUT 1 ,415.55 

NORWALK CT, CG 202. 19 

WOODSTOCK CT, CG 2,245.97 

STRATFORD CT, SUT 27,578.26 

EAST HARTFORD CT, SUT 656.96 

NEW BRITAIN CT, SUT 588.99 

NORWICH CT, SUT 806. 1 8 

FALLS VILLAGE CT, CG 1 ,475.26 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 212.23 

NEW YORK NY, CORP 478.70 

BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 722. 15 

WESTPORT CT, CG 748.70 

WESTPORT CT, CG 450.49 

MERIDEN CT, FTD 19,316.37 

WORCESTER MA, CORP 139. 10 

WORCESTER MA, CORP 216.40 

DANIELSONCT.SUT 193.57 

STRATFORD CT, CG 1 46.60 

BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 1 1 8.34 

CHELSEA MA, SUT 446. 17 

TRUMBULL CT, SUT 5,696.41 

DARIEN CT, CG 809.40 

DARIENCT.SUT 171.90 

GREENWICH CT, CG 574.93 

BETHEL CT, SUT 153.18 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 ,859.04 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 601.60 

WESTPORT CT, CG 138.88 

STAMFORD CT, CG 179.77 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 1 .99 

BETHEL CT.CG 125.25 

SHELTONCT.CG 119.94 

DARIEN CT.CG 128.24 

NEW YORK NY, CG 4,555.40 

E HAVEN CT, SUT 443.38 

LYMECT,CG 182.87 

MILFORDCT.CG 146.30 

GREENWICH CT, CG 168.90 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 474.24 

POOLER GA, SUT 219.28 

CHESHIRE CT, SUT 570.60 

NAUGATUCK CT, CORP 824.40 

ARLINGTON VA, F&NR 5,204.46 
HILTON HEAD ISLAND SC, SUT 263.3 1 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 ,099.44 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CORP 101.40 

N HAVEN CT.CG 1,805.79 

ROCKY HILL CT, CG 2 1 5.22 

TAUNTON MA, CORP 537.20 

ST PETERSBURG FL, CG 217.89 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 190.72 

GREENWICH CT, CG 663.30 

THOM ASTON CT, CG 1 28.43 

MARCO FL, CG 156.43 

ELKINS AR, CG 599.80 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 1 84.25 

AVONCT.CG 451.11 

AVON CT.CG 451.11 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



95 



0452283 150 VARHULAK JOHN S & DOLORES C 

0473068780 VARKAL JEANNETTE C 

0412465880 VARRONE ANNA 

0572297000 VASILEFF NURSERIES INC 

0422637040 VENETTE JOHN ft LEE 

6222228000 VENNERI ROBERT T & ROSE A 

049201 3500 VERNALI JOHN & NANCY 

0473828130 VERNON CORNELIA R 

0423497950 VETRANE DAVID D & MARILYN E 

0162067130 VIAU JULES G & HELENE L 

4324307000 VICTORY AUTO BODY 

5934310000 VIDEO AMERICA 

5489596000 VIDEO PARADISE STAFFORD SPRINGS 

5589825000 VIDEO STUDIO 25 

4346151000 VTDEOLAND HARTFORD 

4346151000 VTDEOLAND HARTFORD 

4861985000 VILLA PIZZA 

5800602000 VILLAGE BOOKSHOP 

2369254000 VISTA DINETTES INC 

1 332267640 VTT A MICHAEL J & CELIA M 

1 193486780 VITALE ALBERTO A & GIOIETTA 

0422487390 VTTARI ROBERT J & RUTH M 

5949474000 VTVID COMPUTER STUDIOS 

0483470580 VTZZO JOHN & GLORIA 

3382693380 VOELL RICHARD A & VIRGINIA C 

3382693380 VOELL RICHARD A & VIRGINIA C 

0452803250 VOLLERO VINCENT A & THERESA S 

0874461 850 VONA CARLO & GRACE 

0474223070 VONA NICOLA & MARIA ANTOINETTA 

0433830540 VONNEIDA SUSAN K 

1 26443 8780 VRAB EL STMONE & JOHN M 

3854001460 VROOM VICTOR 

5959713000 W J S BUILDERS INCORPORATED 

1144814430 WACHTEL HARRY & LESLIE 

1 144814430 WACHTEL HARRY & LESLIE 

0242000480 WADE ROBERT G JR & SHIRLEY 

1 300785220 WADELTON FRANCIS B & M ARJORIE R 

4735827090 WAHBA MAHMOND A & SUSANNE P 

5785492340 WALLACE STRATFORD C & KATHLEEN 

5483292790 WALLINGFORD ELECTRIC DIVISION 

4478632002 WALSH LIQUOR STORE 

1572239300 WALTER ROBERT & SYLVIANE 

2672626200 WALTON FRANK E & BETTY S 

0612882450 WALTON MARY B 

2795861300 WANG PANG H & MEI LEE 

0460318010 WARD BERNARD J & LOUISE S 

4387023000 WARD ENTERPRISES INC 

1154830490 WARD KEVIN W & KATHRYN A 

0093605350 WARD NICHOLAS & CHERYL 

7777115945 WARNEJOHNG 

0753089510 WARNER ALAN 

0402824710 WARNER BURTON J & BARBARA 

5612841762 WARNER INSURANCE COMPANY 

0648048000 WARREN J GOTTIER FUEL COMPANY I 

1 123255490 WASIELEWSKI THADDEUS H & KATHA 

3631619720 WATKTNS JAMES K & IRENE T JR 

0424669150 WATSON POLLY 

2134250240 WATSON ROBERT K 

1992459140 WATSON ROBERT P & KATHARINE M 



F AIRFIELD CT, CG 1 49. 85 

NEW BRITAIN CT, CG 113.16 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 406.46 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 28 1 .52 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 101.24 

GREENWICH CT, SUT 3 16.92 

MIDDLEFIELD CT, CG 1 16.56 

GREENWICH CT.CG 304.53 

STAMFORD CT, CG 1 85.49 

NEW MTLFORD CT, CG 128.50 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 206.41 

SOUTH WINDSOR CT, SUT 723.04 

STAFFORD SPRINGS CT, SUT 253. 10 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 140.39 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 204. 3 1 

HARTFORD CT, SUT 259.58 

BLOOMFIELD CT, SUT 246.77 

ROCKY HILL CT, SUT 1 20.00 

ORANGE CT, SUT 353.73 

GREENWICH CT, CG 149.92 

MAMARONECK NY, CG 803.90 

ESSEX CT, CG 286.24 

GUILFORD CT, SUT 1 88.72 

COS COB CT, CG 227.33 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 4,4 1 3. 80 

RIVERSIDE CT, CG 2,763.92 

HAMDENCT.CG 114.48 

NORWALKCT.CG 527.84 

WILTON CT.CG 102.62 

WINDSOR CT, CG 1 06.66 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1 66.70 

GUILFORD CT, CG 166.28 

TOLLAND CT, CORP 253.70 

STAMFORD CT, CG 506. 1 

STAMFORD CT, CG 506. 10 

DARTENCT.CG 434.19 

NORFOLK CT.CG 295.14 

GREENWICH CT, CG 2,198.80 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 27.99 

WALLINGFORD CT 1,929.95 

NORW ALK CT, SUT 1 20.00 

STAMFORD CT, CG 279.69 

SIMSBURY CT, CG 147.78 

JEWETT CITY CT, CG 295.05 

ORANGE CT.CG 152.88 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 224.3 1 

BRISTOL CT, SUT 180.42 

STAMFORD CT, CG 227.42 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 535.07 

F AIRFIELD CT, IND 7 1 6. 80 

WESTPORT CT, CG 232.75 

N HAVEN CT.CG 135.50 

CHICAGO IL, F&NR 250.00 

ROCKVILLE CT, GE 600.00 

COSCOBCT.CG 1,781.70 

DARTEN CT, CG 175.98 

NORTH BRANFORD CT, CG 366.68 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 1 26.38 

S NORW ALK CT, CG 127. 10 



96 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



2703214930 WATTERMAKER RICHARD A & DIANE 

1033091630 WAUGH THEODORE R & FRANCES 

1033091630 WAUGH THEODORE R & FRANCES 

4745090990 WAYNE JAMES G & JANE Z 

0442692880 WEBB GEORGE H JR & JUDY C 

7210756850 WEBER J KELSON & RITA W 

1 38344221 WEBER STEVEN R & ELIZABETH J 

5692800470 WEEDEN DONALD E & PATRICIA C 

0492266290 WEHRLE FRANCIS A & HILDA K 

0430792530 WEIGOLD ELIZABETH 

0762255240 WEIL KENNETH L & BARBARA H 

0422442690 WEILLER EDWIN & JEAN 

080 1 876260 WEINER WALTER & PHYLLIS 

1 4428 1 6670 WEING AST DAVID & BEATRICE 

1663819110 WEINSTEIN DONALD S 

1151026280 WEINSTEIN EDITH 

01 13809680 WEISBERG NORMAN & MARTHA J 

0401628250 WEISBERG SAUL & IDA 

0682432350 WEISBURGH LEON & FRANKIE 

2572664410 WEISER HALL & GUNNEL 

0433039300 WEISMAN JOEL D & JUDITH 

0442685 1 80 WEISS ARTHUR A & GLADYS 

0442685 1 80 WEISS ARTHUR A & GLADYS 

0412456150 WELCH ARCHIBALD H 

0482256650 WELCH DONALD R & MARY LOU 

0412271950 WELCH HARRIET J 

0481427720 WELDON CHARLES R & JOAN C 

2198232000 WELLMAN OPERATING CORP 

1 693444760 WELLS ANDREW C & CHERYL R 

0836684000 WELLS FARGO LEASING CORP 

0462489890 WELLS THOMAS H & PHYLLIS H 

0558700730 WESSON INC 

0768473000 WEST SIDE HARDWARE INC 

6179618001 WEST STREET CITGO 

4 1 1 5628340 WEST THOMAS L & KATHARINE JR 

062 1855780 WEST WILLIAM G & ANN 

0736017000 WESTERN UNION CORPORATION 

0480930500 WESTPHAL ALLEN L & PEGGY A 

3705548000 WESTPORT INTERIORS INC 

4833943000 WESTPORT POOL & SPA INC 

4685376000 WESTRECO INC 

0442638070 WETSTONE MARSHALL 

0470534220 WETTENSTEIN MILTON 

4877064000 WHALLEY SAMPLE SHOP 

0463257760 WHEELER DAVID B & SHEILA M 

2560378080 WHEELOCK ELIZABETH T 

041 1 880650 WHELAN FRANCIS X & MARGERY M 

04330683 1 WHETTEN THEOR A J 

3115771000 WHISK INC THE 

6042725000 WHISTLE AMOCO INC 

0433813250 WHITE ALICE C 

1193638980 WHITE CHRISTOPHER M 

0690065000 WHITE CROSS PHARMACY INC 

1061867650 WHITE ELIZABETH N 

4666053960 WHITE MICHAEL & SALLY 

7777 1 1 1 427 WHITE RICHARD 

589645 1 000 WHITH AM LANDSCAPE & EVERGREEN 

0473458970 WHITLOCK RONALD 

3102316000 WHITMAN GENERAL CORPORATION 



WILTON CT.CG 130.94 

GREENWICH CT, CG 201. 17 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 04.74 

NEW CITY NY, CG 1 87.7 1 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 339.72 

WILTON CT.CG 167.47 

WEST HARTFORD CT, CG 284.00 

DANBURY CT, CG 400.26 

THOMASTON CT, CG 1 46. 10 

WINSTEDCT.CG 178.13 

STAMFORD CT, CG 122.00 

LONGBOAT KEY FL, CG 2,097.09 

STAMFORD CT, CG 206. 86 

NEW YORK NY, CG 1 02.23 

WATERFORD CT, CG 145.52 

NORWALK CT, CG 100.08 

NEWINGTONCT.CG 409.58 

STAMFORD CT, CG 193.88 

STAMFORD CT, CG 442.61 

NEW FAIRFIELD CT.CG 875.76 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 1,1 04.65 

MERIDEN CT, CG 293.37 

MERIDEN CT, CG 293.37 

HARTFORD CT, CG 716.12 

BRANFORD CT, CG 306.53 

HARTFORD CT, CG 229.49 

ROCKY HILL CT, CG 156.47 

NEW YORK NY, CORP 32,437.00 

BETHLEHEM CT, CG 147.80 

SAN FRANCISCO CA, SUT 1 ,400.00 

SEYMOUR CT.CG 152.51 

WATERBURY CT, UN INS 138.89 

STAMFORD CT, SUT 1 ,802.42 

SOUTHINGTON CT, SUT 202. 19 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 223.02 

ESSEX CT.CG 177.22 
UPPER SADDLE RIVER NJ, SUT 5,065.67 

NEWTOWN CT, CG 663.70 

WESTPORT CT, SUT 1 ,164.57 

WESTPORT CT, CORP 1 15. 10 

NEW MILFORD CT, SUT 1 ,797.37 

BLOOMFIELD CT, CG 1 15.22 

FAIRFIELD CT, CG 738.00 

NEW HAVEN CT, SUT 507.54 

SOUTHPORT CT, CG 497.09 

NEW CANAAN CT, CG 615.96 

DARIENCT.CG 154.89 

STORRSCT.CG 118.80 

SIMSBURY CT, SUT 676.52 

BROOKFIELD CT, SUT 434.70 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 348. 12 

NEW YORK NY, CG 520.50 

SHELTON CT, CORP 287.60 

FARMINGTON CT, CG 533.52 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 43.55 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, IND 528.00 

BOLTON CT, SUT 166.76 

CHESHIRE CT, CG 719.80 

W HARTFORD CT, CORP 2,827.00 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



97 



0404275900 WHITMAN LOUISE H 

0445253500 WHITNEY BRIAN D & PAULA C 

0162457840 WHITNEY RICHARD E & GEORGIA C 

0192453490 WHITTIER JAMES Y & NANCY C 

261 054 1 000 WHOLE DONUT OF ENFIELD INC 

0493458040 WHYKO JOSEPH P & KAREN T 

1007002220 WIBERG BO & DONNA 

4684403000 WICKS N STICKS 

5873526000 WICKS N STICKS 

5873526000 WICKS N STICKS 

0472262 140 WIENER ALVIN & BERNICE 

048361 8670 WIENER LAWRENCE D & MARGARET F 

0452424310 WIHBEY JOSEPH G & BARBARA P 

0443022870 WILBER WILLIAM J & HARRIET D 

1203237550 WILBERDING STEPHEN VC & ANN S 

2354860590 WILCOXEN CHARLES E & JUDITH M 

1 820579750 WILDE EDGAR R ft ZAZEL 

2183614300 WILDSTEIN HOWARD B & MADELINE L 

1231024280 WILK MAX ft BARBARA 

2134876400 WILKINSON BRUCE & AMY 

6705776000 WILLIAM J BECKER LANDSCAPING 

6705776000 WILLIAM J BECKER LANDSCAPING 

6705776000 WILLIAM J BECKER LANDSCAPING 

5332523000 WILLIAM STEPHENS & ASSOCIATES I 

5332523000 WILLIAM STEPHENS & ASSOCIATES I 

2954095050 WILLIAMS CORINNE E 

0170320380 WILLIAMS EDWARD B ft MARTHA E D 

0170320380 WILLIAMS EDWARD B & MARTHA E D 

221 1 839230 WILLIAMS JOSEPH ft CATHARINE 

0576284450 WILLIAMS NEVILLE G & MARGARET A 

0021639880 WILSON DAVID & PATRICIA R 

1 1 82827220 WILSON EVA-MARIA 

2527437540 WILSON JOHN EI 

1192021160 WILSON JOHN MJR& ELIZABETH 

321 3402640 WILSON JOHN S & JEAN H 

1693294040 WILSON THOMAS W & MARIE W JR 

05 1 3689590 WILTSEK KENNETH M & LINDA R 

0552992006 WINDSOR MANUFACTURING 

4019402000 WINE LOVERS 

0671271000 WINES UNLIMITED 

0403853480 WING CHARLOTTE F 

0402045090 WINKLE CHRIS F m & DOROTHY V 

77771 16382 WINSTON MANUEL OR SHEVA 

0423622710 WINTERS LESLIE 

0864427200 WISHTNGRAD DON R & VIVIAN D 

0412035310 WISTING WALTER L 

0480515530 WISTON EUGENE J & JUDITH 

0460119900 WITEK LUDWIK & JOAN 

4288759000 WIXENWAXINC 

0512440520 WOLCTT DENA E & BETTY B 

0472089940 WOLF CHARLES JR & MARGARET 

1 190539520 WOLF ROBERT ft PEGGY 

1 244630250 WONG BENJAMIN & NANCY 

0482878670 WONG CHUCK & KELWING 

41 87035000 WOOD DESIGN CONCEPTS INC 

4187035000 WOOD DESIGN CONCEPTS INC 

0504608630 WOODS CHRISTOPHER & KIRSTEN 

2221842370 WOODS MARY LOU 

6354716000 WOODSTOCK BUILDING ASSOCIATES 



HARTFORD CT, CG 238.49 

GLASTONBURY CT, CG 169.29 

GUILFORD CT, CG 306.31 

S GLASTONBURY CT, CG 159.59 

ENFIELD CT, SUT 339.12 

W REDDING CT, CG 171.20 

STAMFORD CT, CG 161.00 

BRIDGEWATER CT, SUT 222.76 

MILFORD CT, SUT 382.26 

MILFORD CT, SUT 275. 13 

W HARTFORD CT, CG 11 1.92 

GREENWICH CT, CG 88 1 .50 

MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 250.20 

SHELTON CT, CG 335.59 

GREENWICH CT, CG 227.40 

HALLANDALE FL, CG 132.96 

WESTPORT CT, CG 252.81 

WESTPORT CT, CG 181.88 

WESTPORT CT, CG 105.30 

ROW A YTON CT, CG 1 1 3.23 

SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 158.34 

SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 120.08 

SOUTHPORT CT, SUT 148.54 

FARMINGTON CT, SUT 5,708.46 

F ARMINGTON CT, SUT 876. 89 

SOUTHBURY CT, CG 2,604.30 

W WILLINGTON CT, CG 449.35 

W WILLINGTON CT, CG 42 1 . 83 

BROOKLYN CT, CG 1 30.24 

ST MICHAELS MD, CG 325.80 

NORWALKCT.CG 187.13 

NORWALKCT.CG 112.82 

OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 103.33 

DARIEN CT, CG 257.52 

RIDGEFIELD CT, CG 127.60 

WESTPORT CT, CG 928.49 

GREENWICH CT, CG 1 30.76 

WINDSOR CT, SUT 15,235.81 

BETHEL CT, SUT 379.38 

STRATFORD CT, SUT 1 ,348.03 

HARTFORD CT, CG 107.30 

ORANGE CT, CG 357.52 

SOUTHTNGTON CT, IND 1 88.42 

GREENWICH CT, CG 168.49 

STAMFORD CT, CG 183.51 

NO M ADSION CT, CG 1 46.57 

NEW MILFORD CT, CG 1 13.72 

GREENWICH CT, CG 224.94 

NORTH BILLERICA MA, SUT 604.32 

MANCOS CO, CG 404.94 

E HADDAM CT, CG 233.57 

GREENWICH CT, CG 774.41 

WILTON CT.CG 1,240.01 

NEW HAVEN CT, CG 199. 10 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 318.88 

W HARTFORD CT, SUT 364.43 

WESTPORT CT, CG 1 33.33 

OLD GREENWICH CT, CG 260.61 

E WOODSTOCK CT, SUT 1 ,349.53 



98 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



6231856000 
7777114683 
0461242490 
0492887560 
6524458000 
0543445600 
1512877840 
6699276000 
5762893000 
0522401670 
0522401670 
2117976000 
2246270000 
0422832110 
0412656670 
5737762000 
0455016900 
0463421630 
4767505000 
0523467500 
1672417960 
0423624180 
1082844960 
0523894810 
0572719000 
0572719000 
5775025240 
0734027350 
0443068550 
1653476790 
0491649890 
0482422810 
1263642010 
0683279240 
2151108000 
0425419230 
0481881240 
3983692290 
1785071250 
0823085720 
0402802450 
0451833110 
1193817870 
0831840950 
0303097460 
0433243920 
5612791762 
0470533930 
0403404830 
0694372000 
5008859000 
2496057000 
4585659000 
4832069000 
1182633580 
1049329000 
5165576000 
0726125003 
4970729000 



WOODSTOCK LIVERY THE 

WOZNIAK MARK S 

WRENN MARY A 

WRIGHT RICHARD S & ANN S 

WRITERS GROUP 

WRUBLE SUSAN S 

WU DIANE H 

WUCHISKI & WUCHISKI 

WYATT VICTOR 

YAGER HUNTER & GERTRUDE 

YAGER HUNTER & GERTRUDE 



SOUTH WOODSTOCK CT, SUT 
AVON CT, IND 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
S WINDSOR CT, SUT 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
TRUMBULL CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, SUT 
NEW LONDON CT, SUT 
MANCHESTER VT, CG 
MANCHESTER VT, CG 



YANKEE ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION COFAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
YANKEE PROPERTY OF CONNECTICUT STAMFORD CT, CORP 



YANNONE VINCENT F & CAROL A 

YELLTN MARK C 

YOGURT OASIS 

YORK DAVID W MILDRED B 

YORKER WILLIAM E & LINDA A 

YORKMOOR CORPORATION N V 

YOSKOWTTZ IRVING B & CAROLM 

YOUNG CRKE & LOIS 

YOUNG LEONARD & SANDRA 

YOUNG LINCOLN S & PAULINE T 

YOUNGBLOOD KATHRYN 

YOUNGS NURSERIES INC 

YOUNGS NURSERIES INC 

YU GEORGE C S & SHIRLEY K C 

YURKERWICH DAVID E & VICTORIA M 

ZACKTN DAVID & LINDA 

ZAHREN BERNARD J & JUDITH E 

ZAMARDO PRIMO T & HILDA 

ZAMKOV MICHAEL & SYLVIA 

ZAMORE STEVEN M & PEGGY A 

ZASLOW LEONARD & FLORENCE 

ZAYRECORP 

ZDANOWICZ JOSEPH & CATHERINE 

ZEHNDER MARY B 

ZEUTHEN THOMAS V & NANCY A 

ZIESING PETER R & JOANNE K 

ZTNBARG BENSON & JOAN 

ZIURYS EUGENE J JR 

ZLOTNICK GEORGE & ZINA 

ZOHN ROBERT B & ANNA 

ZRIKE RAYMOND & JEAN 

ZUCCHINI RICHARD V 

ZUFFELATO EUGENE S & EMMA 

ZURICH AMERICAN LIFE INS CO 

ZWERDLING NATALIE 

ZYSKOWSKI ROBERT P & GERALDINE 

PAUL BUETTNER FLORIST INC 

PC WAREHOUSE 

PEERLESS ENTERPRISES 

ROBERT BOSCH CORPORATION 

JOHNS RESTORATION & REPAIR 



OLD SAYBROOK CT, CG 
FARMINGTON CT, CG 
COLUMBUS OH, SUT 
CHERRY CREEK NY, CG 
CANTON CT, CG 
NASSAU BAHAMAS, CORP 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
W HARTFORD CT, CG 
SOUTHBURY CT, CG 
WILTON CT, SUT 
WILTON CT, SUT 
MAPLE GLEN PA, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
MIDDLEBURY CT, CG 
SIMSBURY CT, CG 
FAIRFIELD CT, CG 
NEW HAVEN CT, CG 
W REDDING CT, CG 
WESTPORT CT, CG 
MANSFIELD MA, SUT 
ANSONIA CT, CG 
RIVERSIDE CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
NEW CANAAN CT, CG 
STAMFORD CT, CG 
WETHERSFIELD CT, CG 
MANSFIELD CENTER CT, CG 
DANBURY CT, CG 
GREENWICH CT, CG 
ENFIELD CT, CG 
ORANGE CT, CG 
SCHAUMBURG IL, F&NR 
BRIDGEPORT CT, CG 
SHELTON CT, CG 
E HARTFORD CT, SUT 
NORWALK CT, SUT 
NEW FAIRFIELD CT, SUT 
BROADVIEW IL, SUT 
BRIDGEPORT CT, SUT 
WESTPORT CT, CG 



20YTJOANB 

2UISMAN SHAPIRO WOOL BRENNAN G NEW LONDON CT, BU 

21ST CENTURY SOLAR POOLS INC LUDLOW MA, SUT 

3 Q LUBE DANIELSON CT, SUT 

34 EAST PUTNAM AVE CORP WHITE PLAINS NY, CORP 



311.73 
130.20 
383.96 
215.46 

1,524.00 
164.21 
201.80 
120.48 
231.60 
509.62 
833.87 
928.21 

3,026.16 
648.18 
471.43 
666.99 
280.28 
156.74 
334.00 
139.48 
110.00 
300.18 
117.86 
269.90 

6,632.41 

6,632.41 
336.76 

1,214.16 
113.62 
274.18 
259.00 

4,283.10 
120.44 
372.66 

1,805.04 
163.90 
105.16 
133.97 
767.53 
347.70 
157.75 
167.20 
806.88 
436.09 
170.14 
112.10 
250.00 
162.36 
204.94 
300.56 
178.50 
129.00 
767.01 
132.56 
108.42 

2,173.60 
502.49 
136.84 
578.40 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



99 



Finance Advisory Committee 

HONORABLE LOWELL P. WEICKER JR., Chairman 

William J. Cibes, Jr., Clerk 

Established - 1943 Statutory authority - Sec. 4-93 et al., 

Central office - State Capitol, Hartford, Conn. 06106 



Membership on the committee, composed of four elected state and five officers, five legislative 
members alternate members, is as follows: Governor Lowell P. Weicker, Jr.; Lieutenant 
Governor Eunice Groark; State Comptroller William E. Curry; State Treasurer Francisco Borges; 
Senators Joseph Harper, Jr. and Judith Freedman; Representatives William Dyson, Barbara Ireland 
and Regional L. Jones. Alternate members are as follows: Senators Kenneth F. Przybysz and Edward 
Minister; Representatives Doreen Del Bianco; M.Jodi Rell and Moira K. Lyons. 

The secretary of the Office of Policy and Management serves as clerk and the executive budget 
officer of Budget and Financial Management Division as assistant clerk. 

Approval of the Finance Advisory Committee is required for all transfers from the resources of any 
state ftind to any budgetary agency in excess of the regular appropriations thereof and for the transfers 
of any unexpended balances of appropriations to other appropriations of the same agency when such 
transfers exceed $50,000 or 10 percent of such appropriations in any fiscal year. 

Following are the transactions approved by the committee during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1991: 



General Fund Transfers Between Appropriations 
Trans. 
No. Agency and Description Amount $ 

92-2 DRS/Division of Special Revenue - Other 

Expenses to Equipment 41,060 

92-4 Office of Policy and Management - Justice 

Assistance Grants from Local Governments to 

Other than Local Governments 150,000 

92-5 Office of Policy and Management - Drug 

Enforcement Program from Local Governments 

to Other than Local Governments 312,488 

92-7 Environmental Protection/Council on 

Environmental Quality - Other Expenses to 

Personal Services 6,000 

92-8 Office of Policy and Management - From 

Various Accounts to Tax Relief for Elderly 

Renters, Property Tax Relief Elderly 

Circuit Breaker and Conn. Housing 

Partnership Program 646,000 

92-9 Health Services - Other Expenses to 

Equipment 47,200 

92-10 Chief Medical Examiner - Personal Services 

to Equipment 11,000 

92-11 Withdrawn 

92-14 Comptroller - State Employees Service Costs 

to Unemployment Compensation 2,300,000 

92-15 Comptroller - Refunds of Payments to 

Unemployment Compensation 500,000 

92-16 Office of Policy and Management - Property 

Tax Relief for Veterans to Distressed 

Municipalities and Conn. Housing 

Partnership Program 88,000 

92-17 Administrative Services - Personal Services 

to Workers' Compensation Administrator 350,000 



100 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



Trans. 

No. Agency and Description 

92-18 Public Safety - Personal Services to 

Workers' Compensation Claims 
92-19 Mental Health - Managed Service System to 

Professional Services and Workers' 

Compensation Claims 
92-21 Human Resources - Protective Services for 

the Elderly to Blood Tests in Paternity 

Actions 102,000 
92-22 Children and Youth Services - Personal 

Services to Workers' Compensation Claims 
92-23 Children and Youth Services - Health and 

Community Services to Treatment and 

Prevention of Child Abuse 
92-25 Comptroller - Reimbursement to Towns for 

Loss of Taxes on State Owned Property to 

Employer's Social Security Tax 
92-26 Revenue Services - Equipment to Income Tax 

Administration 
92-27 Health Services - Personal Services to 

X-Ray Screening Tuberculosis Care 
92-28 Income Maintenance - Personal Services and 

Medicaid to Various Accounts 
92-29 Comptroller - Various Accounts to State 

Employees Health Service Cost 
92-30 Public Works - Personal Services to Other 

Expenses 
92-32 Education - Special Education to Omnibus 

Grants for State Supported Schools 
92-33 Children and Youth Services - Personal 

Services and Other Expenses to Board and 

Care 



Amount $ 
1,142,000 

1,525,000 

451,366 

174,631 

2,195,797 

1,600,000 

110,000 

24,001,343 

5,600,000 

815,000 

280,000 



3,150,000 
Total $45,598,885 



Trans. 
No. 

92-12 

92-13 
92-24 



General Fund Additions to Appropriations From Resources of the Fund 

Amount $ 
1,000,000 



Agency and Description 

Treasurer - Resources of the General Fund 

to Escheat Claims Fund 

Income Maintenance - Resources of the 

General Fund to Medicaid 

Treasurer - Resources of the General Fund 

to Escheat Claims Fund 



367,304,080 

1,000,000 
Total $369,304,080 



Trans. 
No. 

92-1 

92-6 
92-20 



Transportation Fund Transfers Between Appropriations 

Agency and Description Amount $ 

Transportation - Bus Operations to Highway 

and Bridge Renewal Equipment 897,951 

Motor Vehicles - Equipment to Other 

Expenses 500,000 

Transportation - Personal Services and 

Other Expenses to Workers' Compensation 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 101 

Trans. 

No. Agency and Description Amount $ 

Claims 1,500,000 

92-3 1 Transportation - Personal Services to 

Highway Bridge Renewal Equipment 3,690,000 

Total $6,587,951 



Resources of the Local Emergency Relief Advisory Fund 
Trans. 
No. Agency and Description Amount $ 

92-3 Resources of the Local Emergency Relief 

Fund to Local Emergency Relief Program $857,545 



SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS AND COMPARISON WITH PRIOR YEAR 

General Fund: 

Transfers Between Appropriations 
Additions to Appropriations From 
Resources of the Fund 

Special Fund: 

Additions to Appropriations From 
Resources of the Fund 

Transportation Fund: 

Transfers Between Appropriations 

Resources of the Local Emergency 
Relief Advisory Fund 



1990-91 


1991-92 


$78,755,286 


$45,598,885 


1,040,000 


369,304,080 


10,000,000 


-- 


1,964,000 


6,587,951 


187,288.50 


857,545 



102 OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station 

JOHN F. ANDERSON, Director 

Louis A. Magnarelli, Vice Director 

Established - 1875 Statutory authority - Sec. 22-79 - 22-118 

Central Office - 123 Huntington St., New Haven, Conn. 06511 

Average number of full-time employees - 78 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $4,778,225 

Capital Outlay - $130,402 




The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station is chartered by the General Assembly to 
investigate plants and their pests, insects, soil and water, and to analyze food, pesticides, 
fertilizers, and other products for state departments. The investigations are carried out in laboratories 
in New H aven and Windsor, at experimental farms in Hamden and Windsor, and on public and priv ate 
lands throughout the state. 

During 1991-92, the experiment station became attached to the Department of Agriculture for 
administrative purposes only. Also, during the year, Louis A. Magnarelli, chief of entomology, 
assumed the added duties of vice director, and two new department heads were appointed: Mary Jane 
Incorvia Mattina to Analytical Chemistry and Theodore G. Andreadis to Soil and Water. 

A new drug, taxol, which comes from the bark of Pacific yew trees, has shown great promise in the 
treatment of cancer, and may present an opportunity for Connecticut growers. The experiment station 
tested various ornamental yews grown in the Northeast and has identified several species that contain 
amounts of taxol similar to those in the Pacific yew. The station is studying cultivation practices to 
learn if they affect the taxol concentration in the yews. 

The experiment station has begun an investigation of whether fiber flax could again become a crop 
for Connecticut farmers. Several varieties have been planted at Lockwood Farm and the Valley 
Laboratory. Flax has lower nitrogen requirements than other crops, so growing costs may be lower 
and the threat of leaching of nitrate to ground water reduced. 

Head lettuce is being studied because of the uncertainty of supply from California and increased 
demands from the restaurant, institutional, and fast food industry. In 1991, the station began to test 
nine cultivars to determine the best varieties for Connecticut's soil and climate. 

The experiment station has also been investigating methods of growing asparagus, a crop largely 
abandoned in the 1950s because of Fusarium crown and root rot disease. Research has shown that 
yields are significantly higher when Fusarium-infected fields are treated with sodium chloride. 
S tation scientists are studying the reason for this because no direct effect of the chemical on the disease 
has been found. Research has also found that the asparagus cultivars Emerald and Syn #2 appear well 
adapted and able to produce sustained yields over time. 

Pesticide wastes, such as container andmachinery rinses, occasional leftovers, and accidental spills 
on the soil, present disposal problems. Researching ways to destroy such wastes and prevent 
contamination of surface and ground waters, the station has discovered that hydrogen peroxide with 
an iron catalyst in the presence of ultraviolet light or sunlight can decompose a variety of pesticides 
and other compounds into nontoxic or relatively safe and more biodegradable organic compounds. 

The experiment station continues its investigations of ticks and tick-borne diseases. Once thought 
to be confined to islands in Massachusetts and New York, the station has documented human 
babesiosis in southeastern Connecticut. Babesisia microti, the causative agent, was isolated from the 
blood of 7 of 12 patients and from 27 of 59 white-footed mice captured in tick- infested areas. Mice 
infected with B . microti were captured in East Haddam, Lyme, Old Lyme, Stonington, Montville, and 
West Hartford. The station has also found rickettsiae that reacted to antiserum of the causative agent 
of canine ehrlichiosis in deer ticks and American dog ticks, but their specific identities and ability to 
cause human disease are unknown. 

The experiment station also has continued studies of insects of hemlock, including the hemlock 
woolly adelgid. The adelgid rarely causes problems in the west, but in Connecticut it has killed many 



OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 



103 



hemlocks. After several years of growing exotic species in Connecticut, the station found that 
significantly fewer adelgids survived on Asian and western hemlock species than on the eastern 
species. The adelgid also caused little or no bud injury on the non-native hemlocks. Long-term studies 
are continuing so that station scientists can learn how well these non-native hemlocks grow in 
Connecticut. 

Bees are important beneficial insects, not just for honey production, but because of the vital role 
they play in pollination of crops, especially fruit trees and some vegetables. For several years, the 
station has been searching for and quarantining apiaries with two types of mites. A total of 5, 700 honey 
bees were individually examined from 3 1 apiaries in 26 towns. Tracheal mites were discovered in 10 
of these towns: Newtown, Bethlehem, Ashford, Suffield, Norwich, Sharon, Milford, Salem, Danbury, 
and Washington. The infested bees were treated with menthol and all known owners of hives within 
a three-mile radius of the apiaries were notified of the infestations. A state-wide survey was carried 
out for Varroa mites in the fall of 1991. The mite was found in Monroe, Newtown, North Stonington, 
Voluntown, Sterling, Thompson, Tolland, Thomaston, and Stonington. All 135 colonies at 47 apiaries 
received treatments to control the mites. 

The experiment station donated fruits and vegetables grown in its experiments to shelters and food 
sharing programs for the poor in the New Haven and Hartford areas. The station also plowed seven 
community gardens and the Inner City Co-op Farm in New Haven and gave technical assistance to 
these projects during the growing season. 

The station performed chemical, seed, soil, and tick tests, answered inquiries, conducted plant and 
nursery inspections, surveyed for gypsy moth, and examined bees as listed below: 



Service or Test Number 




Chemical Tests for: 




Department of Consumer Protection 


1,591 


Department of Agriculture 


913 


Department of Environmental Protection 


154 


Town health departments 


1,007 


Experiment station 


126 


University of Connecticut 


13 


Veterinarians 


8 


Department of Revenue Services 


89 


Department of Transportation 


2 


Consumer complaints 


440 


Miscellaneous 


48 


Ticks tested for spirochetes 


2,200 


Seeds tested for germination: 




Vegetables 


370 


Lawn 


14 


Field Crops 


5 


Soil tests completed: 




Food 


2,714 


Natural resources 


7,768 


Inquires answered: 




Analytical chemistry 


720 


Food or crop 


2,689 


Ornamentals, trees, lawns 


19,544 


Man 


2,535 


Arborist license information 


249 


Acres surveyed for gypsy moth 


402,402 


Acres of nursery stock inspected 


9,170 


Nursery and seed inspections: 




Nurseries inspected 


372 


Nursery inspections 


671 


House plants inspected 


9,322 


Nursery stock containers inspected 


33,294 


Flats and pots of groundcovers inspected 


10,349 


Pounds of seed inspected 


3,032 


Bee hives examined for foulbrood 


378 


Bees examined for mites 


5,700 



104 OFFICE OF POLICY AND MANAGEMENT 

The experiment station reaffirms its continuing policy of commitment to affirmative action and 
equal opportunity employment as immediate and necessary objectives. Its goal of discovery and 
service requires that it rely solely on merit and accomplishment in all aspects of the employment 
process. A research apprenticeship program to hire a minority high school student with a strong 
interest in science was continued. In addition, the station participated in a new effort to provide an 
inner city high school student with an opportunity to work in a chemistry laboratory. The station's 
affirmative action plan was filed on schedule and was approved by the Commission on Human Rights 
and Opportunities. 



Commission on Victim Services 

JOHN C. FORD, Administrator 

Established - 1978 Statutory authority - Sec. 54-201 through 54-224 

Central office - 1155 Silas Deane Highway, Wethersfield, Conn. 06109 

Average number of full-time employees - 27 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $1,630,982 

Payments to victims - 1991-92 - $2,998,164 

• 

A program designed to provide monetary compensation, direct services and information to 
victims of crime was established in 1979. Compensation is paid to victims who suffer a bodily 
injury as a direct result of a crime. The maximum award is $15,000 per victimization and $25,000 in 
cases of homicide. These maximums went into effect October 1, 1987. 

Revenue for the Criminal Injuries Compensation Account is provided through penalty collections, 
federal grant funds and donations. Administrative costs of the program are also charged to the account. 
The commission may apply for the received money for the account from any federal, state or private 
source. 

Direct services are provided primarily through the Victim Advocate Program. Victim advocates 
assist crime victims and their families during prosecution; refer victims who need counseling, medical 
and other support services; provide escort services; help victims obtain their rights, such as the return 
of property seized as evidence in a crime and notification of issues relevant to the crime; and provide 
other services as necessary. 

A special program that is designed to meet the needs of the families of homicide victims is now in 
place. 

Information is provided to victims through an information clearinghouse. Victims can access the 
information clearinghouse through a statewide toll free number. 

The victim advocates are funded by annual appropriations from the state General Fund and grants 
administered by the state. The information clearinghouse is funded by the compensation fund. 

The agency is committed to equal opportunity and affirmative action with a focus on employment 
goals for minorities, women and disabled persons. The agency affirmative action plan was reviewed 
and approved by the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. 




ADMINISTRATIVE 
SERVICES 



Department of Administrative Services 

REGINALD J. SMITH, Commissioner 

Stephen J. Negri, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1977 Statutory authority - Sec. 4, et al. 

Central office - 165 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 884 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - General Fund - $21.9 million; 

Technical Services Revolving Fund ■ $22.5 million; 

General Services Revolving Fund - $42.5 million 

Capital outlay - 

Organization structure - Office of the Commissioner, Division of State Personnel, 

Bureau of Collection Services, Bureau of General Services, 

Bureau of Technical Services, and Bureau of Purchases 




Office of the Commissioner 

This office is composed of several units that support the functions of the five chief operating 
sections of the department. The units and the chief operating sections work together as the 
central service agency to provide timely, economical and high-quality goods and services to the 
operating agencies of state government. Some administrative highlights follow. 

The Business Administration Division. It is comprised of the General Fund Fiscal and Budget 
Management, Revolving Funds Fiscal andBudgetManagement, Personnel/Payroll, Human Resources 
Development and the Information Resources Management units. It also manages the state employee 
housing program and the state's telephone billing operation, and administers the Capital Equipment 
Purchase Fund and the Capital Equipment Data Processing Purchase Fund. During the 1991-92 fiscal 
year, the division was expanded to include the Information Resources Management Unit and the 
telephone billing operation in an effort to improve long-range planning and budgeting, and to 
consolidate all fiscal operations into one organization. 

Among the initiatives during the year were: updating of the administrative procedures manual for 
the agency, including the development of several new procedures; introducing a strategic planning 
process to better define agency goals and objectives; implementing stricter oversight of agency 
procurement and expenditure activities to better monitor spending and reduce costs; developing an 
automated financial reporting system for the central warehouse operation; instituting stricter controls 
regarding the payment of telephone bills; and, initiating cost reduction measures to reduce the 
agency's personal services expenditures. 

Also within the division, the Information Resources Management unit took measures to make 
departmental computer systems more available and more responsive to the users, including expanding 
the use of unattended computer operations at night to perform system backup and routine maintenance. 
The use of local area networks was increased with systems introduced or expanded in the Bureau of 
Purchases, Collection Services and the Division of State Personnel. Cross-training continued for 
division personnel to allow for greater flexibility in assignments. 

There were 36 merit promotion examinations administered by the division during the fiscal year. 
Our Contract Compliance Program was refined and expanded to ensure that those with whom the 
department does business comply with the principles of equal employment opportunities. 

The department is committed to providing opportunities, services and programs on the basis of 
merit, ability and job-related skills. The Business Administration Division administers policies and 
programs to enhance career ladders for women and other protected groups in the department. During 
the fiscal year some of the efforts included pre-professional training programs; the merit promotion 
systems; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and Sexual Harassment Prevention training; 
workshops in career development and in preparation for commercial driver's license exams; and 
technical assistance in affirmative action for all department employees. 

106 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 107 

The annual affirmative action plan for the department, submitted September 15, was approved by 
the state Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. 

Through May 3 1, the department hired 15 full-time persons; 1 1 or 73.3 percent were males and 4 
or 26.7 percent were females. Of these hires, 9 or 60.0 percent were white males and 2 or 13.3 percent 
were Hispanic males. Additionally, 3 or 20.0 percent were white females and 1 or 6.7 percent was a 
black female. Of the 15 persons hired, 12 or 80.0 percent were white; 1 or 6.7 percent was black and 
2 or 13.3 percent were Hispanic. 

Among the 5 1 promotions during this period, 22 or 43. 1 percent were males and 29 or 56.9 percent 
were females. There were 21 or 41.2 percent white males and 1 or 2.0 percent was an Asian male. 
Additionally, 23 or 45.0 percent were white females; 4 or 7.8 percent were black females; 1 or 2.0 
percent was an Hispanic female and 1 or 2.0 percent was an Asian female. Of the total 51 persons 
promoted, 44 or 86.3 percent were white; 4 or 7.9 percent were black; 1 or 2.0 percent was Hispanic 
and 2 or 3.9 percent were Asian. 

The department also promoted six part-time employees; 5 or 83 .3 percent were males and 1 or 1 6.7 
percent was a female. They include 5 or 83.3 percent blacks and 1 or 1 6.7 was an Hispanic employee. 

Internal Audit. The department' s Internal Audit Division provided audit service to all components 
of the department. The audit work resulted in reports being issued on topics such as: Bureau of 
Personnel — Dual Employment, Bureau of General Services — Annual Physical Inventory of the 
Central Supply Warehouse, Bureau of General Services — State Surplus Property. Audit work was 
performed and reported on the Bureau of Personnel Worker's Compensation responsibility in the 
claim fee service charges and claim registration as administered by the current third-party adminis- 
trator, Alexsis, Inc.. 

Additionally, it performed and reported on audits that affect the entire department. Examples of 
such audits include updated authorized signature listing, use of personal computers and software, and 
deposit process for compliance with statutory authority. Its audit schedule included annual reviews 
of state employees who reside in state -owned housing, quarterly follow-up of the Auditors of Public 
Accounts reports on each bureau's operation as well as ten United States Department of Agriculture 
donated-foods processor audits. 

Furthermore, it responded to requests for assistance from bureau management in such areas as 
development of procedures for computer software acquisition, procedures for arbitrators and 
consultant payments, the statutorily mandated filing of meeting minutes by management committees, 
and a review on the prompt deposit of recovery checks by the worker's compensation third-party 
administrator, Alexsis, Inc.. 

Communications Unit. It continued to publish The State Scene, which was changed to a bi- 
monthly schedule, and Management Update, which is published on an occasional basis. The unit also 
continued to publish the Governor's Digest of Administrative Reports and other department or 
statewide reports as needed. Desktop publishing continued as one of the unit's service goals. It also 
continued to serve as an in-house referral for Freedom of Information requests and it developed 
standards and procedures for releasing computer-stored information. The unit and the director 
continued to assist the commissioner and Governor's Office with special projects as requested. 

Legislative Liaison's Office. This office continued to be the bridge between the department and 
the legislature on developing laws and policy that affect department operations. 

Division of State Personnel 

Raymond A. Meany, Deputy Commissioner 
The state Personnel Division is responsible for the recruitment, selection, appointment, classifica- 
tion and compensation of employees to provide efficient and effective state services, and for 
procuring, retaining, developing, and providing meaningful careers to state employees. The state does 
not discriminate against employees based on race, religious creed, sex, age, disability, national origin 
or ancestry. Fiscal year 91-92 was a year of unprecedented change as the work force was reduced and 
agencies restructured. The Office of Labor Relations (OLR) negotiates twelve labor-management 
contracts covering employees in the executive branch, except for faculty and non-faculty professionals 
of higher education. This represents approximately 70 percent of the state's work force. Early in this 
fiscal year OLR coordinated the labor relations aspects of the budgetary emergency shutdown of state 
services, which lasted four days. Following enactment of a state budget, the office assisted in the 
renegotiation of a statewide concession agreement with a coalition of all employee unions. The 
agreement delayed scheduled salary increases and pension contributions and reduced several other 
planned expenditures in the amount of S328 million. The concession agreement also provided for the 
extension of the contract period of all contracts for which OLR is responsible for one to three years. 
This agreement was approved by the legislature during its regular session in February. Staff played 



108 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

a major role in administering contract provisions related to the layoff of nearly 1 ,000 state employees 
whose positions were not funded in the 1993 fiscal year budget. It also became necessary to negotiate 
further concessions with the union coalition. This later agreement included restructuring past service 
liability payments to the state employee pension fund and a commitment to jointly enter into a 
placement and training program designed to find alternative employment for several hundred 
employees whose jobs were being eliminated in the budget. Toward the end of this year employment 
relations staff provided support to the Placement and Training Committee. The committee was 
successful in placing 1 19 employees scheduled for layoff and these efforts continue. 

Staff participated in numerous grievances (up 32 percent from last year), arbitrations, court actions, 
and prohibited practice charges related to the shutdown, emergency furloughs and layoffs. 

The Workers' Compensation program, which covers the cost of medical bills and lost wages for 
employees injured on the job, is administered for state employees by the workers' compensation 
section. Workers compensation costs increased eight percent over the last year. This percentage of 
increase marks the lowest annual growth rate ever recorded in the workers' compensation program 
and is substantially lower than the previous nine -year average of 21 percent increase. Vigorous claim 
and medical management by Alexsis, Inc., the plan administrator, and implementation of a medical 
bill review program by a subcontractor, Fortis, Inc., are mostly responsible for the favorable results. 

To control costs and improve efficiency, the General Assembly passed a comprehensive workers' 
compensation bill effective this year. The administrative and benefit changes contained in this 
legislative reform will assist the state to control program cost escalation. A highlight of this reform 
package authorized employers to develop a plan implementing a managed medical care program for 
occupational injuries. The department is currently completing the development of this program for 
state employees. 

Recovery operations, including third-party subrogation, overpayment collections, and wage 
matching, continue to be a priority. With intensified investigations and more aggressive pursuit of 
funds owed to the state, recoveries for the 1992 fiscal year are the highest ever recorded. In April, 
Governor Weicker requested that each agency establish an effective written health, safety and loss 
control policy statement to be issued to agency employees. Several large departments were also asked 
to prepare a comprehensive Safety Action Plan for the 1993 fiscal year. These plans will be monitored 
quarterly with results reported to the Governor's Office. 

The Administrative Services Section provides agencies with lists of candidates eligible for 
appointment and maintains employment lists according to merit system rules; audits and approves 
agency personnel transactions consistent with state statues, regulations, and policies; processes 
positions and personnel actions; and has responsibility for the accuracy of data entered into the 
computerized personnel information system. 

This section also worked with the Office of Labor Relations to coordinate the development of 
statewide seniority lists for the purpose of layoff selection when required by contract. The section 
maintains and administers the reemployment lists for classified employees, including 12 collective 
bargaining units and managerial, confidential, and other non-bargaining employees. Effective July 
1,1992, the state laid off many employees and reduced classification rankings in lieu of layoffs for 
others. Most of these employees have reemployment rights in multiple classifications. There are now 
529 reemployment lists. 

The Technical Personnel Services Section manages the classification system, including developing 
class specifications, approving position classifications, conducting classification grievances, and 
determining the 

internal alignment of jobs by applying a point-factor job evaluation system. Selection strategies are 
designed, validated, and administered for all classified state jobs, insuring that employment divisions 
conform with state and federal legal requirements. Recruitment services and public access to 
employment information are also provided. 

Diminished hiring led to a reduction in merit system testing, but this was offset by an emphasis on 
modernizing personnel systems, assisting with the placement of employees targeted for layoff, and 
providing consultation to agencies engaged in restructuring. 20,228 applications were processed this 
year for 786 examinations. 

As a means for improving work force management, the number of job classifications are being 
reduced. Approximately 289 titles have been eliminated, and conversion to generic job classes is 
being actively pursued. Classification activity was extremely heavy, with 7,565 position actions 
reviewed. After a comprehensive study of policies governing classification and selection, recom- 
mendations were made to improve cost effectiveness and service delivery by streamlining the 
classification system, creating more flexible approaches to selection, decentralizing some adminis- 
trative functions to agencies, and reducing paperwork. Significant legislative reform was achieved in 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 109 

a cooperative effort with the Legislative Program Review and Investigation Committee. Public Act 
92-1 65 provided for human resource strategic planning, an upward mobility committee, an improved 
method of certifying names from candidate lists, reclassification without exams within a career series 
and planning for a new automated personnel system. 

The design and development of the new Automated Personnel System (APS) has begun. This will 
include interfaces to the Automated Budget System for biennial budgeting. The overall purpose of the 
new system will be to facilitate better statewide personnel management, make data more accessible 
to users, and provide data for use by the Automated Budget System. 

Selection strategies, including test administration procedures, are being updated to insure full 
compliance with the Americans with Disabilities act. The Merit Promotional System has been 
redesigned to successfully integrate more objective assessment methodologies. Turn-around time on 
all examinations has been improved from 3.76 to 3.01 months, and quality customer service has been 
further enhanced through innovative programs to automate testing. All Objective Job Evaluation 
studies of the unclassified service have been completed, including state technical colleges and the 
University of Connecticut Health Center. A classification data base and resource center is being 
designed and implemented to provide information for managing the state classification system and 
facilitating ongoing job evaluation services. As agencies reduced the size of their work forces, the 
backgrounds of individuals targeted for layoff were reviewed to determine which vacancies they 
would be qualified to fill. Those with suitable qualifications were referred to agencies with vacancies, 
and, in some cases, agencies were advised on restructuring jobs to accommodate referees. The 
Personnel Development Center provides Total Quality Management consultations to state agencies, 
training and development programs for bargaining unit employees, and management and executive 
programs for senior level civil servants. This year the in-service training calendar for bargaining unit 
employees offered 110 courses for supervisory, maintenance and secretarial employees. Over 3,000 
employees completed these courses. The management development program provided 1 8 programs 
for over 400 management level personnel. 

Thirty-five participants graduated from the Connecticut Executive Management Program, bringing 
to 210 the number of managers who have completed this program over its eight years. Seven hundred 
staff of the Judicial and Motor Vehicles departments were training in service excellence, and over 300 
managers were trained in Total Quality Management. Fourteen agencies were assisted with Total 
Quality Management briefings. Various labor-management projects were also managed, including 
needs assessments for maintenance and secretarial bargaining units and a specialized series of courses 
for the maintenance employees. Unit staff provided the administration for the state tuition reimbursement 
program and labor management programs by providing training programs, career mobility, and 
recruitment and retention strategies for health care professionals. The Health Care Cost Containment 
Committee (HCCC) addresses health care costs, benefits and other health-related issues for state 
employees and retirees. The HCCC selected a consultant this year who will assist the committee in 
implementing a statewide Managed Care Program. This program will provide health insurance for 
employees and retirees and control the escalating rise in health care costs. A survey conducted to 
delete health insurance coverage for ineligible dependents resulted in an annual savings of over 
$300,000 to the state. Health promotion and wellness activities are also HCCC responsibilities. A 
wellness coordinator conducts screenings, seminars and related activities for state employees. The 
Management Incentive Plan, a management by objectives plan with differential pay for performance, 
continued through a difficult year. No payouts were made to managers in July 1991, but payments 
were reinstated in July of 1992. A focus group was convened to consider changes to the program for 
next year. 

Several proposed suggestions would affect the annual appraisal and payout portion of the program, 
allowing more agency flexibility in determining the number and size of bonuses available. A 
managerial salary survey was also launched this year to provide abasis for comparing state managers ' 
salaries with their counterparts in the private sector. 

The Homer Babbidge Fellowship to the Hartford Graduate Center's Executive Management 
Master's Program was awarded again this year. Twenty applicants were considered. Outplacement 
Training was provided in the autumn to employees targeted for layoff. The programs were offered by 
state employees trained in outplacement. They were attended by over 125 employees. A premium 
conversion program was offered for the first time this year. This program, available to all state 
employees, provides savings to both the employee and the state by allowing health insurance 
premiums to be paid on a pretax basis, as a reduction to salary. Premium conversion is the second 
portion of the state's flexible benefits program to be implemented. Also this year, the state Personnel 
Division published a revision of the managers' handbook and the state benefits manual, an 
explanation of the changes in workers' compensation through The State Scene newspaper, and 



110 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

published the division's fifth annual report. The Employment Relations Office manages both 
statewide affirmative action coordination and cooperative labor-management issues. Assistance is 
also provided to the Health Care Cost Containment Committee. During the 1991-92 fiscal year staff 
continued to provide affirmative action support to agencies as requested. Services focused on 
developing affirmative action plans, handling complaints, and counseling agencies about preventing 
sexual harassment. 

This office coordinated state agency participation in the Labor Department's Summer Youth 
Employment and Training Program. This resulted in the development of 600 worksheets for "Youth 
at Risk." In accordance with a new state law, all employees with supervisory responsibilities were 
scheduled for training on the provisions of the sexual harassment law and practical approaches to 
preventing harassment on the job. The training was conducted by a representative of the Permanent 
Commission on the Status of Women. Cooperative labor-management committees and programs 
continue to flourish. The Quality of Worklife Program (QWL) is celebrating its tenth year of building 
partnerships among constituent groups throughout the state's health care system. The state school 
teachers' contract now has language in it establishing a QWL program, and projects have been 
initiated with its membership. 

Bureau of Technical Services 

Robert F. Granquist, Deputy Commissioner 
The Bureau of Technical Services provides state agencies with operational and technical support 
for information technology and telecommunications. These include central business systems and 
services, data processing planning and coordination, facilities ' management, data processing consulting 
services, technical assistance in support of agency information systems' development, and computing 
and telecommunications services at the central processing center. The Systems Development and 
Engineering Services Unit supports internal and external agency initiatives in new application system 
planning, analysis, design, and construction as well as ongoing system support and engineering. The 
systems' development function specializes in database management activities and the use of new 
technology approaches in system requirements. It also provides agencies with some systems analysts 
and programmers to help support automation efforts. The capacity planning function monitors actual 
machine use versus earlier projections in support of computer configuration and financial planning. 
Some commitments were made in the last fiscal year to support a number of projects that will have 
considerable affect on statewide automation efforts. These include: 

• Additional improvements in telecommunications billing to handle the increasingly complex 
acquisitions related to deregulation. 

• Assistance in the deployment of a state income tax. 

• Expanding the capabilities of the DAS Purchasing System. 

• Assisting the State Personnel Department in the execution of an automated employee seniority 
system reflecting the various bargaining units arrangements. 

• Development of a Master Name Index System for the Criminal Justice Information Community 
System. 

The bureau's data center currently processes about 75,000 jobs per month on its computer system. 
A network of 350 telecommunication lines is used to connect over 6,500 devices to the computer 
center. Rebates were returned to the users of data center services during the 1991-92 fiscal year as a 
part of an overall cost-containment program. During the fiscal year, the Personal Computer 
Development Center provided support to the state's users of personal computers and offices that are 
automated with stand-alone and network-linked personal computers. A number of local area networks 
were deployed in state agencies including the Department of Correction, Workers ' Compensation and 
DAS/Bureau of Purchases. Selected software applications were developed for state agencies using 
this technology. 

The Education Services Unit provided statewide technology training support for users of multi- 
vendor hardware and computer software and related technologies. During the fiscal year, the unit 
offered 200 courses at least four times per year at five major training sites in the state. The Business 
Office Support Systems Unit provided business office information systems designed to handle the 
unique needs of over 100 state agencies' business office functions and regulations as specified by the 
state. These include a State Agency Appropriations Accounting System (SAAAS)) which manages 
over 60 percent of the state's general fund accounts and a Time and Attendance System that tracks 
attendance and employee data for over 50 percent of the state's employees. Significant growth 
occurred in SAAAS usage with 10 new agencies added. Time and Attendance increased by six new 
agencies. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES HI 

Bureau of General Services 

Larry Charles, Sr., Deputy Commissioner 

The Bureau of General Services (BGS) was created May 1, 1992 from the Bureau of General and 
Technical Services to focus on improving service to DAS customers. The Operations Groups of BGS 
includes office services, warehouse, surplus, fleet and laundry. The services they provide include 
mail, courier and copy/duplication services; sale and distribution of office supplies and general 
commodities; processed meats, state cars, vans and light trucks; laundry cleaning; distribution of state 
and federal surplus equipment, distribution of federal donated foods for the school lunch program 
throughout the state. 

BGS does not receive funding from the legislature, for the most part. It is a set of businesses that 
sell products and services to its customers, including state agencies, local governmental entities, non- 
profit nursing homes, non-profit hospitals and non-profit publicly funded organizations. 

Its goals are to restructure BGS as a business with plans to address long-standing capital program 
needs, modernizing the warehouse, fleet operations, the Federal Donated Foods Program and the 
copy/duplication center. It also intends to start a new business that sells electronic publishing services. 

Bureau of Collection Services 

Wayne R. Seabury, Executive Director 

The Bureau of Collection Services is a revenue-producing service bureau responsible for the 
investigation, billing and collection of all charges for the support of persons cared for in facilities or 
programs operated or funded by the state. These facilities and programs generally fall under the 
jurisdiction of the departments of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, Children and Youth Services 
and the Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission. The patient or spouse of a patient, or 
parent of a patient under the age of 18, are liable to pay up to the per capita cost of care, but may be 
billed at a lesser rate in accordance with their ability to contribute. 

The bureau is responsible for the billing and collection of money due in public assistance and child 
support cases and for performing collection services for other state agencies by mutual agreement. 
The bureau also has responsibility for collection, processing, entering, reconciliation, and daily bank 
depositing of all non-AFDC child support collections for the State of Connecticut. This project, 
together with AFDC child support collections, has resulted in the bureau processing approximately 
4,500 payment transactions per working day. 

Total collections received by the bureau for 1991-92 fiscal year exceeded S358 million. This 
represented an increase of $5 million from the previous year's collections. In addition, the bureau 
processed over $59 million in non-AFDC child support payments. Title XIX receipts from the 
Department of Income Maintenance, which received a 50 percent federal reimbursement, totaled over 
$279 million. 

The bureau assisted the Department of Income Maintenance in its claim of $349,523,498 for 
"disproportionate share" for the Department of Mental Health facilities from the federal government. 
The bureau also collected almost $700,000 through interception of state income tax refunds for debts 
owed to the State of Connecticut. 

Bureau of Purchases 

Peter W. Connolly, Administrative Manager 

The Bureau of Purchases is responsible for contracting and directing the purchase and acquisition 
of equipment, supplies, and services, including those related to data processing, printing and 
publications. It is responsible for establishing standards for the quality of goods purchased. 

In the last fiscal year, the bureau processed bid proposals and contract awards, and authorized about 
$300 million worth of goods and services. Approximately 70 percent of all bids were awarded within 
two weeks of their opening date. 

The bureau has initiated a process of combining agency requirements for services into regional 
contracts, gaining the purchasing leverage available through large-scale contracting. In addition to the 
substantial cost savings afforded to the agencies, the contract administration will decrease because 
of the reduced number of outstanding contracts. 

The bureau has implemented the initial stage of the Automated Purchasing System and is preparing 
bid documents through the system. Final stages of the system will permit on-line vendor and contract 
data bases for agency use and the electronic transmission of purchasing requisitions. 

The bureau's Standards Section is responsible for the establishment, update and revision of 
standards, specifications and acceptable-brands lists for use in procurements by all state agencies. 
With that responsibility through the bureau's quality control function, Standards Section inspectors 



112 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

ensure that commodities and services purchased conform to established standards and specifications 
by examination, inspection and testing. Approximately 1,950 delivery inspections were made in 
1991-92. 

The Data Processing Procurement Division is responsible for the procurements and contracting of 
all data processing resources. About $36 million worth of data processing resources were bought 
through this division. This figure does not include the contract award for micro computers, which 
provides agencies with a master list from which they can select vendors selling them. The micro 
computers can be bought without any further involvement in the process from the bureau. This action 
improved turn-around times for agency acquisitions. 



Employees' Review Board 

FREDERICK W. MCKONE, Chairman 

Established - 1979 Statutory authority - Sec. 5-201, 202 

Central office - One Hartford Square West, Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - Part of Department of Administrative 

Services' Budget 
• 

The Employees' Review Board was established for appeals from disciplinary actions and 
grievances for permanent state employees excluded from collective bargaining units. Public 
Act 87-456 added two more board members and limited all members to two consecutive terms. It also 
increased the board's duties to include grievances regarding unsatisfactory performance evaluations 
and allowed the state to appeal to court appeal board decisions. The law had allowed only employees 
bringing appeals. 

During the year, the board acted on seven appeals. These appeals involved one suspension, two 
layoffs, one temporary service, one compensation, one termination, and one consolidated appeal on 
furloughs. The board was involved in eight hearing days and one executive session. The board held 
six executive meetings during the year. The board chairman is Frederick W. McKone. 

The board is composed of seven members appointed by the governor: Chairman McKone of 
Rockville; Sylvio Preli of Windsor Locks; Marjorie Bennett of Bethlehem; Rita C. Griswold of West 
Hartford; John Mortimer of Stamford; Howard R. Sacks of West Hartford; and Frank W. Murphy of 
Norwalk. Executive secretary to the board is Marie Cantin of Wethersfield. 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 113 

Statewide Emergency Telecommunications 

GEORGE J. POHORILAK, Acting Administrator 

Established - 1980 Statutory authority - Sec. 28-24 

Central office - 20 Grand St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 6 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $327,044 

• 

The Bureau of Statewide Emergency Telecommunications was established by the 1980 General 
Assembly to improve the delivery of police, fire, and emergency medical services to the people 
of the state through the development and maintenance of coordinated telecommunications systems. 

Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 28-27 requires the bureau, subject to review of an advisory commission, 
to administer and coordinate the implementation of Enhanced 9-1-1 emergency access telephone 
service in the state. This service was put into operation in December 1989 and is currently being 
refined and expanded into the private sector. 

Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 28-30 requires the bureau to establish minimum training standards for 
public safety telecommunicators, coordinate the delivery of public safety telecommunicator training 
programs and certify the successful completion of public safety telecommunicator training programs. 
This program provides a minimum level of training for public safety telecommunicators who process 
9-1-1 calls for emergency assistance. 



Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities 

LOUIS MARTIN, Executive Director 

Established - 1943 Statutory authority - Chap. 814c 

Central office - 90 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 99 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $3,989,085 

Capital outlay - $2,004 

Organization structure - Administrative Office and four Regional Offices 

• 

Fmnded in 1943, the nations oldest civil rights agency, the Connecticut Commission on Human 
Rights and Opportunities, enforces state laws prohibiting discrimination in employment, 
housing, public accommodations and credit transactions. 

The commission has four regional offices — in Hartford, Waterbury, Bridgeport and Norwich — 
which receive and resolve complaints from individuals who believe that they have suffered illegal 
discrimination. The commission's administrative headquarters, also located in Hartford, houses the 
division that administers the commission's other significant legal mandates — laws requiring 
affirmative action and contract compliance by Connecticut state agencies. 

The agency is governed by a nine member policy-making body, five of whom are appointed by the 
governor and four by the legislature. The commission met on a monthly basis during the past fiscal 
year. Agency policy is implemented by a commission-appointed executive director, who selects 
agency staff in accordance with the state merit system. 

Report of the Commission 

This has been a very productive year for the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and 
Opportunities (CHRO), but many challenges still face us. Like every other state agency, CHRO has 
been asked to do more with less. The commission has had to respond to an increasing caseload in the 
face of layoffs. It has also had to respond to events which have raised serious concerns about civil 
rights in our nation, including the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearings and the Rodney King verdict 
in Los Angeles. These are times which demand renewed leadership from civil rights agencies, and the 
Connecticut commission has begun to play an important role as a voice for justice. 

This past year, for example, commission staff worked closely with town and city human relations 
commissions to help form a statewide organization called CAHR — the Connecticut Association for 
Human Rights. The commission also worked with the Connecticut Women's Education and Legal 
Fund to produce a report entitled For Ourselves and Our Daughters: Speaking Out on Sexual 



114 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Harassment in Connecticut. And, for the first time in many years, the commission took its meetings 
"on the road" to make meetings more accessible for constituents in other cities; the first "out of town" 
meeting was in Bridgeport. 

CHRO initiated changes in its case processing methods, and made significant gains in eliminating 
the backlog of cases. The commission approved comprehensive new regulations which clarify case 
processing procedures under new statutes enacted since 1990. Commissioners, staff, and affirmative 
action professionals from state agencies also worked together in committees this year to study the 
effectiveness of CHRO's affirmative action program, and made recommendations which are now 
being researched by staff. 

The commission also took steps to "work smarter" and to have a greater impact on discrimination 
and inequality in Connecticut. The new Education and Outreach Program and a Systemic Enforce- 
ment Program was created because preventing discrimination and addressing its structural causes are 
as important as seeking justice in individual cases. 

In October, CHRO approved a new mission statement to reaffirm the vision for the agency: "The 
mission of the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities is to eliminate discrimination 
through civil and human rights law enforcement and to establish equal opportunity and justice for all 
persons within the state through advocacy and education." The members of the commission are proud 
to work toward this mission with a talented and dedicated staff. The commission will celebrate its 50th 
Anniversary in 1993, and looks forward to reaffirming its commitment to equality with all the citizens 
of the state. 

The Commission 

Leslie J. Brett, Ph.D., West Hartford, chairperson; Jane Glover, New London, deputy chairperson; 
Ellen F. Riley, Simsbury, secretary; Cesar A. Batalla, Bridgeport; Reverend Christopher L. Rose, 
Hartford; Andrea M. Scott, New Haven; Timothy Taylor, East Hartford; Wyrot M. Ward, Vernon; 
Rosalind Z. Wiggins, Stamford 

Report of the Executive Director 

The staff of the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities was engaged in 
many significant activities during the year. Some of the more noteworthy development were: 

• First Annual Executive Staff- Commissioner Retreat - This effort served as the planning base for 
Commission activities for the 1991/92 fiscal year. 

• Five-year Agency Strategic Action Plan - A Five-year strategic action plan was formulated and 
developed during the past year through the combined efforts of the commission and the agency ' s staff. 
The commission formally adopted the plan in April, 1992. This strategic action plan for the operation 
of the agency covers the period of April, 1992, through December, 1996. 

• Commission Committee on Affirmative Action - The committee was charged with reviewing 
Connecticut's' affirmative action laws for the purpose of making them more efficient and effective. 

• Legislative Breakfast - This effort was designed to present the commission's 1992 legislative 
package to key members of the Connecticut Legislature. 

• New Education and Outreach Activities - A new Education and Outreach Department was formed 
which began activities such as the initiation of Operationl.D. , aprogram to educate the public on how 
to identify illegal discrimination; the production of a CHRO employee newsletter; facilitation of the 
formation of the new Connecticut Association of Human Rights, and the groundwork for the 
commission's celebration of its 50th anniversary in 1993. 

• New Legislation & Regulations - Two bills directly affecting the commission were passed by the 
1992 General Assembly. Public Act 92-257, effective October 1, 1992, amends Connecticut's fair 
housing laws so as to meet the Department of Housing and Urban Development's substantial 
equivalency requirements. The act affords complainants and respondents in housing discrimination 
cases the right to opt for the commission to bring its enforcement action superior court as opposed to 
an administrative hearing. It also limits the present sex discrimination exception for organizations that 
provide single sex and sleeping accommodations to places in which rooms have shared bathroom 
facilities. 

The General Assembly also enacted Public Act 92-85 An Act Concerning Sexual Harassment 
Education and Training in the Workplace. Effective October 1, 1992, the commission will be 
authorized to require all employers of three or more workers to post a notice informing employees that 
sexual harassment is illegal and that remedies are available to the victims of sexual harassment. This 
new law will also authorize the commission to require all employers of 50 or more workers to provide 
their supervisory employees two hours of education and training on federal and state sexual 
harassment laws, regulations and remedies. The commission gathered information concerning sexual 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



115 



Allegation* Filed by Protect* 


rf FM*«S<! : : : 


:■:•:•:•:•:•:•:■:•:•:•:•:•:•: 






Class 


1990-91 


199192 


Change 


Race 


523 


681 


30% 


Religious 


21 


33 


57% 


Mental retardation 


9 


11 


2 


Color 


521 


653 


25% 


Sex 


605 


747 


23% 


National origin 


171 


241 


41% 


Ancestry 


161 


224 


39% 


Marital status 


34 


29 


-15% 


Age 


444 


517 


16% 


Physical disability 


309 


391 


27% 


Alienage 


1 


2 


1 


Blindness 





4 


4 


Prior conviction of a 
crime 


3 


2 


-1 


Mental 
illness/disability 


24 


47 


96% 


Familial status 


9 


23 


156% 


Source of income 


14 


18 


29% 


Learning disability 


5 


4 


-1 


Use of guide dog 











Sexual orientation 


-- 


21 


-- 


Other 


65 


101 


55% 


Total 


2,919 


3,749 


28% 



The Year at a Glance 

Case Statistics from 

the Commission 

on 

Human Rights and 

Opportunities 



Aflegatiotts Filed by 

C5V.""i? 


Lype 


situation 
Employment 


1 9W-91 iwi-92 Change 
2,733 3,466 27% 


Housing 


120 174 45% 


Public 
accommodations 


59 96 63% 


Credit transactions 


2 2 


Civil liberities 





Code of fair practices 





Criminal offender 


4 4 


Other 


7 7 7 


Total 


2,919 3,749 28% 



Filed by_Hc 


i-> 


£:•:•:•:■:•:•:•:•;•:•:•:•:•:• 




using l^ttiworKes:; 


>:■:■>■:■:<■:■■<:<::■: 




1990-91 


1991-92 


Change 






Rental 


47 


64 


36% 


Sales 


14 


7 


-50% 


Eviction 


9 


14 


56% 


Other 


13 


15 


15% 


Retaliation 





1 


1 


Total 


83 


101 


22% 



Filed bv Public 


Accommodations Categories 




1990-91 1991-92 


Change 


Entertainment 





2 


2 


Recreation 


3 


2 


-1 


Public Agency 


11 


25 


127% 


Food 


1 


6 


5 


Other 


22 


33 


50% 


Total 


37 


68 


84% 



Complaints Filed ''By Region 


Location 


1990-91 1991-92 


Change 


Capitol 


425 587 


38% 


Southwest 


330 474 


44% 


West Central 


324 412 


27% 


Eastern 


454 561 


24% 


Total 


1,533 2,034 


33% 



Filed by Employment Categories 






1990-91 


1991-92 


Change 


Hiring 

Promotion 

Demotion 


134 

95 

61 


167 
106 

74 


25% 
12% 
21% 


Discharge 
Terms 

^conditions 
Retaliation 


1,177 
539 
171 


1,422 
541 
220 


21% 

037% 

29% 


Sexual 

harrassment 

Other 


65 
207 


250 
240 


285% 
16% 


Pregnancy 
Aiding & abeting 
Advertising 
Failure to refer 


164 

6 

1 


128 

4 


2 


-22% 
-33% 



1 


Failure to classify 
Exclude from 




2 

1 
2,623 



4 




2 

-1 

20% 


memberships 
Expel from 
membership 
Total 



3,158 



Allegations Filed By Region 
Location 1990-91 1991-92 


Change 


Capitol 865 1,245 


44% 


Southwest 667 807 


21% 


West Central 447 602 


35% 


Eastern 940 1,095 


16% 


Total 2,919 3,749 


28% 



ASegatiofiS Closed 
Pre-determination settlement 


1990-91 
193 


1991 -92 Change 

186 -4% 


Satisfactory adjustment 


28 


43 


54% 


Withdrawl with settlement 


308 


260 


-16% 


Public hearing 


32 


49 


53% 


No reasonable cause 


2,280 


1,983 


-13% 


Administrative dismissal 


549 


523 


-5% 


Withdrawl without settlement 


726 


581 


-20% 


No-fault agreement 


-- 





-- 


Release to sue 


.. 


53 


-- 


Hearing officer Decision on 








default 


- 





.. 


Total 


4,116 


3,678 


-11% 



116 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

harassment and began drafting regulations to implement Public Act 92-85. That act, which is not self 
implementing, requires the commission to adopt regulations before employers are required to comply 
with its provision. The commission's proposed regulations concerning description of organization, 
rules of practice and personnel data are the result of a two-year effort to revise and enhance the 
commission's current procedural regulations and adopt new regulations required by statute. The 
regulations were noticed on August 8, 1991 to receive input on the impact of legislation enacted in 
1991 on the regulations. After the regulations were revised to encompass comments received to date, 
they were renoticed in the November 26, 1991 issue of the Connecticut Law Journal. On December 
13, 1991 a public hearing was conducted to receive comments on the regulations. The regulations 
were revised to reflect the latest comments and approved by the commission and the attorney general. 
As the fiscal year was about to close, the commission was preparing to submit these regulations to the 
Legislative Regulations Review Committee. 

• Banner year for enforcement of Connecticut's anti-discrimination laws - During FY 1991-92, the 
agency: received more complaints than in any year in commission's history; made determinations on 
more cases than in any year in commission' s history; determined reasonable cause in more cases than 
in any year in commission's history; initiated a commission complaint against a large Connecticut 
employer, a complaint which affects more than 50 employees; received 250 sexual harassment 
complaints, nearly four times the amount received the previous year. 

All this was accomplished despite the fact that the commission was at its lowest staffing level in 
years and had to endure two rounds of layoff notices that eventually resulted in seven employees being 
laid off. The staff is committed to insuring that the commission's mission becomes a reality. 

Processing of Discrimination Complaints 
New Cases Received 

Discrimination complaints filed with the commission rose by 33 percent from the previous fiscal 
year, and allegations rose by 28 percent. In addition , the agency also processed 3,894 intake 
dispositions — inquiries about legal rights which did not become formal complaints, but which 
required staff time for interviews, research, referrals and other tasks. 

Complaints filed againststate agencies numbered 138 — seven percent of all cases filed — 13 more 
cases than filed in FY 1990-91 . Allegations involving age discrimination were 14 percent of the case 
load. The average age of a person filing an age discrimination complaint was 53, and half of the 
complainants were 55 or older. Twenty-two were under 40, and 122 were 60 or older. 

A total of 1,925 complaints were pending on June 30, 1992, including complaints which were 
reconsidered or reopened. The commission's Management Information Services Division tracks the 
processing and maintains the records of discrimination complaints filed with the agency. During the 
year, the division provided numerous reports to field operations personnel and prepared reports to 
fulfill contract requirements for the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and 
the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Both federal agencies defer 
complaints to the commission for investigation and partially reimburse the state's general fund for the 
commission's assistance. The division also provided special reports to the Office of Federal Contract 
Compliance Programs, as well as to municipalities for use in their annual revenue-sharing audits. 

Cases Resolved 

During the last fiscal year, the commission made considerable progress in addressing the large 
volume of pending discrimination complaints. The commission resolved 3,678 allegations of 
discrimination in FY 1991-92. A single complaint filed with the commission may contain allegations 
of more than one discriminatory practice and may be based on more than one protected class. An 
example would be a complaint claiming discriminatory employment conditions and termination from 
employment based on age and physical disability. Complaints sometimes include issues over which 
the commission has no legal authority along with allegations which are jurisdictional. An example 
would be a complaint alleging termination from employment based on race and retaliation based on 
"whistle-blowing." Such non-jurisdictional allegations are listed in the tables as "other." 

Favorable results for complainants were achieved in 14 percent of all complaint allegations closed 
resulting in roughly $1.3 million in settlement awards. The great majority of these settlements are 
mediated "out of court" by the commission without the need for a costly public hearing which is 
similar to a trial. Monetary awards for complaints resolved by predetermination settlement, satisfac- 
tory adjustment, or withdrawal with settlement totaled $1,082,463 in FY 1991-92. An additional 
$183,377 was awarded for complaints decided at public hearing. The commission continues to 
monitor compliance with settlement agreements and hearing orders to ensure their terms are carried 
out. 






ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 117 

Public Hearings 

Public hearings are held on complaints that are certified after an investigation has established there 
is reasonable cause to believe a discriminatory practice has been committed, and after efforts to 
eliminate the practice through conciliation have failed. 

Under the law, attorneys who have been admitted to practice in the state for at least two years, who 
are able and willing to hear discriminatory practice complaints, may submit their names to the 
agency 's executive director who shall transmit their names to the governor for consideration. Hearing 
officers serving during the fiscal year were: lohn D. Adams, Enfield; Merle Berke-Schlessel, New 
Haven; John Cooney, Manchester; John F. Daly, IU, Hartford; John R. Flores, Hartford; Deborah 
Samuels Freeman, Hartford; Robert J. Haggerty, Willimantic; Ronald C. Harris, Windsor; Donald R. 
Holtzman, Hartford; Carolyn W. Kone, New Haven; Gail S. Kotowski, Guilford; Barbara G. Lifton, 
New Haven; Thomas C. McNeill, Jr, Avon.; Neil F. Murphy, Jr., Farmington; Brerjdan J. O'Rourke, 
New Canaan; Helen Z. Pearl, New Britain; Jon L. Schoenhorn, Hartford; Herbert R. Scott, New 
Haven; LeaN. Shedd, Hamden; Roxanne E. Sinclair, Waterbury; John F. Stafstrom, Jr., Bridgeport; 
Nicholas W. Thiemann, Westport. 

More than twice the number of discrimination cases were assigned to a public hearing in FY 92 than 
in the previous year — a total of 178 cases. Of that number, 154 were employment cases, 13 were 
housing cases and 11 were public accommodations cases. A total of 71 cases were resolved through 
the public hearing process: 24 were hearing officer opinions, 43 were negotiated settlements and four 
were final orders of dismissal or withdrawals. 

There were eight administrative appeals from the commission's dismissal of complaints pending 
at the end of the fiscal year. There were also nine court actions pending concerning public hearing 
cases. These primarily involved appeals from decisions of hearing officers or actions brought by the 
commission to enforce hearing officer decisions. Two enforcement actions were settled during the 
year resulting in monetary awards of SI 1,923.00 to complainants. The commission prevailed in two 
appeals from hearing officer decisions and lost a third. 

Affirmative Action & Contract Compliance 

The Affirmative Action and Contract Compliance Division evaluates state agencies' affirmative 
action plans and provides training and technical assistance to state agencies in plan development and 
implementation. The division also reviews employment practices of firms contracting or subcontract- 
ing with the state and its political subdivisions other than municipalities. Contractors are required to 
provide information regarding their employment and subcontracting practices, and if they do not 
comply with state anti -discrimination statutes, they cannot receive future contracts. The division also 
develops, revises and implements the commission's affirmative action plan. 

During Fiscal Year 1991-92, the commission received 101 state agencies' affirmative action plans 
for review and analysis, of which 84 were approved and two disapproved. Two certificates of 
noncompliance were issued and subsequently withdrawn upon compliance. The commission con- 
ducted 140 technical assistance sessions and numerous telephone consultations and workshops 
during the year. The commission monitored agencies' performance to increase the effectiveness of 
the implementation of affirmative action through 15 on-site compliance reviews. 

The commission published its 15th annual report, The Status of Affirmative Action in Connecticut 
State Government. The 145 -page book describes in narrative and charts, the activities of state agencies 
to comply with state affirmative action law during the 1991 calendar year. The commission analyzed 
data based on affirmative action summary reports from each state agency. Included in the report are 
comparative data for 1990 and 1991 about the state work force and about each individual agency 
broken out by race, sex and occupational category. 

During the year, the commission established a statewide committee with a mandate to conduct 
comprehensive review of the affirmative action laws and regulations to ensure that state government 
promotes equality of all of it citizens in both its substance and in its administrative procedures. 
Committee members represented a cross- section of state government and a wide spectrum of opinion 
to ensure that Connecticut's affirmative action policies and procedures are truly exemplary. 

In October 1991, the commission issued a semiannual report, The Status of Affirmative Action in 
Connecticut State Governments and the Impact of State Government Employee Layoffs on Affirmative 
Action and Protected Classes. An analysis of the layoffs showed Hispanic males and all Hispanics 
were the only groups which experienced a statistically significant disparate impact as a result of the 
layoffs within state government as a whole. The commission recommended that all state agencies 
reassess their priorities with a view to reallocating resources in order to carry out their affirmative 
action responsibilities. 

During the year, the staff reviewed 7,964 notices of contracts awarded by the state; selected 1,032 



118 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

contracts for monitoring and conducted 876 desk audit reviews of contracts. Computerized contract 
compliance data provided timely and accurate information on the status of all contractors and 
conformance reviews. Contract compliance technical assistance to state agencies and contractors was 
provided upon request. The commission also mom tors state agencies' efforts to solicit the participa- 
tion of minority business enterprises in state contracts . The commission has notified agencies that they 
must submit reports on numbers and dollar amounts of contracts awarded to minority business 
enterprises annually. This data was computerized and the commission generated a report on the 
"Utilization of Minorities and Women Business Enterprises." The commission maintained a presence 
on the Legislative Minority Business Enterprises Review Committee and the newly created Committee 
on Contract Compliance and Economic Development, which consists of minority business owners 
from the private sector and state legislators and is chaired by the commission. 

Education & Outreach 

The commission not only enforces the state's civil and human rights laws, but also, through its 
Education and Outreach Office, serves as an advocate for contemporary human rights issues and a 
source of education for the public about human rights. The Education and Outreach Office, enhanced 
in 1992 through the reallocation of agency resources, organizes community outreach activities for the 
agency in the form of community meetings, special events and public speaking engagements. 

Operation I.D. — Identify discrimination is a newly developed educational forum being presented 
in communities through out Connecticut. The forum presents information to assist the public in 
identifying critical issues in the fight against discrimination. What constitutes illegal discrimination 
and how to report it to the commission is discussed, and audience interaction is encouraged. The 
commission has conducted three Operation I.D. forums to date: the first in Bridgeport in conjunction 
with several Hispanic organizations, the second in Hartford cosponsored by the Hartford NAACP, 
and the third in Hartford cosponsored by the San Juan Center. The coming year will see this fledgling 
program presented in numerous communities across the state and linkages are being developed with 
women's groups, minority groups and other constituencies of the commission. 

During FY 1991-92, commission staff members also responded to numerous requests for public 
speaking engagements. Through the coordination of the Education and Outreach Office, staff gave 
presentations to approximately 1800 persons about civil rights, the Americans with Disabilities Act, 
sexual harassment, affirmative action, contract compliance, and other issues. The commission played 
an integral role in the statewide conference, The Americans with Disabilities Act: The Keys to 
Implementation for State Government. Also, during National Fair Housing Month in April, the 
commission served as cosponsor of the annual Connecticut Fair Housing Conference. 

Next year, will mark the 50th anniversary of the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and 
Opportunities, the nation's oldest state civil rights agency. Planning was undertaken this year for a 
series of public events to commemorate this milestone. The yearlong commemoration will include 
a professional theatrical presentation with the proceeds donated to a scholarship fund, the inaugura- 
tion of an annual awards banquet to honor those who have made significant contributions to civil rights 
in Connecticut, a statewide civil rights conference and an international human rights program. This 
year, the Education and Outreach Office continued to assist in the development of an independent 
network of local human rights commissions serving municipalities. This self-governing body — 
C AHR, the Connecticut Association for Human Rights — serves as a forum to share information and 
activities of particular interest to persons working in the field of human rights in the state of 
Connecticut. 

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Commission continued to be an important special project of 
the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities which serves as its secretariat and consultant. 
The Annual Bell Ringing Ceremony, held at the state capitol on Monday, January 20, was attended 
by more than 200 people. The program, a musical tribute to Martin Luther King Jr., featured Governor 
Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. as the keynote speaker and Louis Martin, executive director of the Commission 
on Human Rights as master of ceremonies. 

Production of At Issue, a magazine-format television program exploring contemporary issues in 
human rights, was begun during the past fiscal year by the new Education and Outreach Office. At 
the close of the year, the first show, Eyes of Hope, about a young man turning his life around with the 
help of his boxing coach, was scheduled to be broadcast over cable access stations statewide. 
Subsequent shows will explore violence in the streets, AIDS, the history of civil rights in the state and 
other topics at issue for the citizens of Connecticut. 

The Education and Outreach Office also works with representatives of both print and broadcast 
media to provide information about human rights and the activities of the state's human rights agency, 
through news releases and other communications to the media. The office also coordinated agency 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES U9 

participation in informational broadcasts on radio and television, including programs and interviews 
on all major stations concerning sexual harassment. 

Commission publications were updated during the fiscal year to include sexual orientation as anew 
protected class. These included the flyer, How toFileaDiscriminationComplaint and Discrimination 
Is Illegal posters available in English and Spanish. The annual report of the agency and a booklet of 
Connecticut an ti -discrimination laws were also available to the public. 

After meeting with representatives of the People With AIDS Coalition, the commission produced 
a new flyer about filing complaints of discrimination based on AIDS/HIV status, emphasizing the 
added confidentiality procedures instituted by the agency for these complaints. 

The commission also played a leading role in writing and designing For Ourselves and Our 
Daughters: Speaking Out on Sexual Harassment in Connecticut, the preliminary report of data and 
stories related by callers to the Sexual Harassment Hotline. The Hotline was sponsored in December, 
1 991 , by a coalition of advocacy and labor organizations in response to widespread discussions about 
sexual harassment generated by the Clarence Thomas Supreme Court nomination hearings in October 
of that year. 

The 1992 General Assembly enacted Public Act 92-85, An Act Concerning Sexual Harassment 
Education and Training in the Workplace. In addition to drafting regulations for the implementation 
of this law, the commission has taken the lead in compiling a database listing of training consultants, 
a trainer's guide, and a list of print and video resources for sexual harassment prevention. 

State Insurance Purchasing Board 

PETER BULKELEY, Chairman 

Robert B. Goode, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Established - 1963 Statutory authority - Sec. 4a-19, 20 and 21 

Central office - 55 Elm St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Number of full-time employees - 2 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $8,613,782.12 

• 

At the conclusion of the fiscal year the following members served on the board: Peter Bulkeley, 
chairman, Old Saybrook; Robert B. Goode, Jr., vice chairman, West Hartford; Joseph A. 
Fields, South Windsor; Saren M. Langmann, Farmington; Thomas J. Leddy, Portland; Robert J. 
McLucas, West Hartford; Edward F. McCabe, Glastonbury; William S. Miko, Jr., Monroe; Sandra 
F. Orluk, Granby; Elizabeth L. Snider, Hartford; John F. Solan, Jr., Bloomfield; William E. Curry, 
Jr., state comptroller, ex-officio. 

During the year the board held seven regular meetings in full committee. In addition, the chairman 
and agent of record continued aperiodic review of ongoing matters. Boardmembers continue to serve 
as volunteers and receive no compensation for the performance of their duties. Along with the agent 
of record, they make themselves available for insurance questions relating to all departments and 
agencies of the state. 

The principal duties of the board are to: determine the method by which the state shall insure itself 
against losses by the purchase of insurance as governed by statute; obtain the broadest coverage at the 
most reasonable cost; direct negotiations for the purchase of such insurance and determine the 
applicability of deductibles and self -insurance requesting appropriations from the contingency fund 
to establish reserves and safeguard the process as necessary; designate the agent or agents of record 
and select the companies from which the insurance coverage shall be purchased; negotiate all 
elements of insurance premiums, surety bond premiums and the agent's commission; establish 
specifications for each contract of insurance and request bids for each such contract through the agent 
of record with each such contract being for a specified period of time. 

The board serves as the focal point of risk management and insurance matters affecting the state. 
In its daily surveillance of the overall program, the board strives to maintain optimum coverage at 
minimal cost to the taxpayers. A continued balance of commercially placed coverage and self- 
insurance principals, including retentions and deductibles, helps to serve the program. Limits of 
liability for major exposures including the fleet, highway, airport and transit bus operations were 
retained as the board secured appropriate coverage at a cost projected to be economically advanta- 
geous to the state. 

Recent deductible formats were maintained in areas previously insured from the initial point of 
exposure. The property deductible format continued to provide savings to the state. All-risk 



120 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

replacement cost coverage with an "agreed amount" of $3,53 1,000.00 was secured at a rate of $.025 
per $100 of value. As legally required, the board continues its assessment of the feasibility of self- 
insurance as a possible alternative to segments of the present system. By incorporating retentions and 
deductibles in major property and liability programs, a careful balance of the assumption of risk is 
maintained. The board continues to pursue proposals for three-year policy terms whenever available. 
Such proposals help to refine the projections of future budgets and serve to help preserve the board's 
notable record of demonstrated budget control. Gross expenditures for insurance premiums for the 
fiscal year amounted to $10,413,041.84, of which $3,844,134.34 represents deductible reimburse- 
ments in accordance with various insurance policy provisions. $1,799,259.72, of the gross expenditures, 
represents refunds including return premiums and reimbursements from departments and agencies for 
insurance purchased on their behalf and for which reimbursement provisions are made in the statutes 
or through some other means. Loss histories of all policies are studied each year. Under Conn. Gen. 
Statutes 4a- 19, 20 and 21, preparation of specifications for all coverages are completed prior to the 
placement of each contract. The board has established a usual six percent commission rate for the 
agent of record. This is substantially below the average rate of commission otherwise paid on 
commercial insurance business within the industry. The agent of record's total commission income 
for the fiscal year was $381,414.25. 

In late 1991 and early 1992, the board conducted an analysis of the performance of the existing 
agent of record, and unanimously voted to reappoint the existing agent of record. The agent attends 
all meetings of the board and its sub-committees and provides the necessary research, technical 
advice, negotiating skills, access to markets and daily contacts to complete the total risk management 
concept of the board. 

In line with the state's established position on affirmative action, the board reports that it does 
business only with those insurance companies which are licensed or approved by the State of 
Connecticut Insurance Department and which practice positive affirmative action in their own 
operations. There were no changes in the total number of personnel positions of the board during the 
year. When vacancies for these two positions do occur, the board adheres strictly to the practices 
established by the Department of Administrative Services Personnel Department. 



State Properties Review Board 

WILLIAM F. GERETY, Chairman 

Richard P. Brainerd, Vice Chairman 

Charles W. Mizak, Acting Executive Director 

Established - 1975 Statutory authority - Sec. 4b-3 

Central office - 165 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 5 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-1992 - $260,436 

• 

The State Properties Review Board consists of six members. Three appointed jointly by the 
speaker of the house and the president pro tempore of the senate and three appointed jointly 
by the minority leader of the house and the minority leader of the senate. The members are: William 
F. Gerety, chairman; Richard P. Brainerd, vice chairman; Rowland Ballek, secretary; William A. 
Barone; Joseph F. Coombs; and Pasquale A. Pepe. 

The function of the board is to review all transactions involving the acquisition, construction, 
development or leasing of real estate for housing the offices or equipment of all agencies of the state. 
The board also reviews all transactions involving the lease or sale by any state agency of any real estate 
to third parties. Also, any architects, landscape architects, professional engineers or land surveyors 
selected by the commissioner of Public Works and any contracts entered into by the commissioner 
with any architects, landscape architects, professional engineers or land surveyors for employment 
of any project are subject to the approval of the board prior to their employment by the commissioner. 

In addition under P. A. 80-349 and P. A. 80-441, charged the board reviews, evaluates and approves 
the acquisitions of development rights on agricultural land in the Agricultural Land Preservation Pilot 
Program. The board meets as often as is necessary to conduct its review. 

The board follows the affirmative action plan prepared and administered by the Department of 
Administrative Services. 




MOTOR VEHICLES 



Department of Motor Vehicles 

LOUIS S. GOLDBERG, Commissioner 
Nicholas A. Camillone, Deputy Commissioner 
Michael W. Kozlowski, Deputy Commissioner 

William W. Murty, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1917 Statutory authority - Title 14 

Central office - 60 State St., Wethersfield, Conn. 06109-1896 

Average number of full-time employees by fund - 

724 General; 68 Emissions; 17 Federal 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - 

Transportation Fund - $35,684,083 and Emissions Fund - $19,080,915 

Capital outlay - $435,872 

Organization structure - 12 Full Service Branches, 

4 Photo License Centers, and 2 Photo License Buses 

• 

The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) was established by legislative act in 1917 to 
accomplish two major objectives that have remained unchanged: 

(I) To promote and maintain highway safety by administering standards' for the registration of 
motor vehicles and the licensing of operators of such vehicles, 

(II) To raise revenue through such activities to fund the construction and maintenance of state 
highways. 

In addition to these objectives, the legislature subsequently added responsibility for licensing and 
regulation of automotive-related businesses, such as dealers and repairers, automotive dismantlers 
and auto body shops, school bus operators, truckers, and leasing companies. The department's 
objective in these areas is the protection of the state's motorists and consumers. 

Today, the department registers 2.6 million vehicles and licenses 2.4 million operators, including 
operators of commercial and public conveyance vehicles. These responsibilities require over 6.1 
million transactions with the public annually. The department collects approximately $244 million 
annually, $170 million of which supports the Department of Transportation, with the remainder 
allocated to other statutory funds . DMV also assists in state and municipal collection of sales, use and 
property taxes. 

This administration is dedicated to providing innovative management in a consumer-friendly 
environment for the delivery of motor vehicle-related services to Connecticut's motorists and to 
applying and enforcing the state's motor vehicle laws. Consistent with Governor Weicker ' s direction, 
DMV is committed to establishing policy without regard to politics and designing programs to 
produce results rather than being symbolic. 

Major Interdi visional Initiatives 

Through an intensive cooperative effort and a spirited team approach, the following interdivisional 
initiatives have been implemented or are currently in progress. In certain projects, leadership is 
assigned to the appropriate operating division, while in others, DMV's Alternate Delivery Systems 
(ADS) group coordinates interdivisional activities and establishes pilotprograms. The ADS approach 
was first used in implementing Commercial Drivers Licenses, a federally -mandated project com- 
pleted on April 1, 1992. ADS staff evaluated departmental capabilities and suggested using an outside 
vendor to test some 57,000 anticipated applicants. DMV is "on line" with the national licensing 
database and has tested all those drivers who have applied on a timely basis. 

A pilot project with the Automobile Club of Hartford promises to give even broader access to 
license renewal services. AAA will provide renewal services at the Manchester and Waterford offices 
using equipment supplied by DMV. If the pilot proves beneficial to consumers, DMV and AAA, 
expansion of this program will occur. 

The implementation of the new Long Island Sound license plate is also a major project. The new 
marker plate, which will benefit the Long Island Sound Fund at the Department of Environmental 
Protection, is being integrated into the system with the help of several Connecticut corporations who 
are providing marketing advice and assistance. 

A coordinated effort was necessary in the concept, design and implementation of four Photo 
License Centers and the DMV Photo License Bus. Consumer- friendly hours allow convenient public 

122 



MOTOR VEHICLES 1 23 



access to these alternate DMV sites on weekdays between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. and weekends between 
9 a.m. and 1 p.m. 

New customer service inroads are being made as DMV develops an on-line registration system for 
leasing companies and dealers licensed by DMV. A joint pilot project with the trade group 
representing the leasing licensees will lead to a system of electronic transfer of information between 
these leasing companies and DMV. This system will reduce DMV registration volume dramatically, 
eliminating periodic backlogs and processing delays. 

To comply with the Federal Clean Air Act, the emissions program will be improved. Plans now call 
for coordinating biennial emissions and registration expiration dates and staggering renewals 
throughout each month, effective 1995. 

The department, recognizing the varying needs and abilities of drivers, is working with its Medical 
Advisory Board as well as interested public service groups to design a "graduated" license program 
which will be responsive not only to the sense of dignity, independence, mobility and accessibility 
offered to individuals by the private automobile, but also to highway safety issues. This "graduated" 
license program will greatly expand Connecticut's very limited, restricted license procedures, and 
represents a significant step forward in traditional DMV licensing policies. "Graduated" licenses may 
include provisions for driving under specific conditions such as use of corrective lenses, use of 
vehicles during daylight hours only, use of special mirrors and highway use limitations. 

Customer Service 

DMV processed transactions during fiscal year 199 1 -92 in seven fewer branch offices. The closing 
of these branch offices (necessitated by budget shortfalls the state was experiencing) was done in such 
a way as to avoid as much dislocation and overcrowding as possible, through redeployment of staff 
to areas of anticipated growth and increased demand. This effort was successful because the necessary 
steps were taken to pre-empt most foreseeable problems. 

Li efforts to increase levels of service to the public, DMV continues to explore new service points. 
In addition, many old procedures have been simplified, while procedures creating obstacles to 
efficiency have been eliminated. As noted by the Commission to Study the Management of State 
Government (the Thomas Commission) in their final implementation report, "This is a long-overdue 
reorganization and consolidation and represents a major accomplishment by Motor Vehicles 
Commissioner Louis S. Goldberg and the Weicker administration. It is the first time in generations 
that an attempt has been made to look at the state as a whole and determine how many offices are 
actually required to meet Connecticut's needs." 

Major Customer Service initiatives 

• Consistent with the Thomas Commission's recommendations for regionalizing DMV services, 
a large office is currently under construction on Route 7 in Norwalk and will be completed during the 
summer of 1993. 

• The Photo License Centers, DMV ' s first response to the need to close seven branch offices in June 
1991, have been efficient and well received. Cooperation from local government and private busi- 
ness has resulted in centers in Milford, Stamford, Middletown and Manchester. 

• The Photo License Bus, a retro-fitted Connecticut Transit bus, has been a very successful adjunct 
to our branch office and photo license center network. The bus visits Westport, Norwalk, Derby, 
Vernon, Waterford, Hartford, and Putnam. A second Photo License Bus has been added recently to 
service additional locations. (On an annualized basis, the license centers and the first bus removed 
200,000 transactions from the branches; the second bus will increase that amount.) 

• Virtually all renewal registrations are now processed by mail, rather than in branch offices. (This 
removes another 200,000 annual transactions from branches.) 

• Licensed driving schools now arrange tests for their students in locations other than DMV offices. 
DMV inspectors are dispatched to one of four regions in the state. Sites for each testing session are 
provided by the driving schools. The schools guarantee a minimum number of test- takers for each 
session as a condition of their participation. (This procedure eliminates as many as 50,000 license 
applicants annually from branches.) 

• Safety inspections performed on used vehicles previously registered in another state are being 
waived when the previous state is one of 22 which have programs equal to Connecticut' s. The Vehicle 
Identification Number is now verified during the emissions inspection, keeping almost all t h o s e 
vehicles out of DMV lanes. (This equates to 60,000 fewer vehicles in DMV inspection lanes each 
year.) 

• Automotive dealers who meet certain standards now perform safety inspections on vehicles 
purchased from states other than the 22 included in the program above. DMV inspectors cer ti fy 



124 MOTOR VEHICLES 



the inspection, further reducing the number of vehicles which must visit DMV lanes. 

• Dealers who take delivery of new cars each year as a courtesy to leasing or rental car companies 
are now able to register those vehicles without standing in branch lines. (This will eliminate another 
25,000 transactions annually from branches.) 

• All new car dealers on the dealer issue program recently switched from metal plates to paper 
window certificates. This change reduces misuse and eliminates the need for dealers to visit branch 
offices to replenish inventories. It also allows them to provide temporary registration documents for 
more registration classes. 

• DMV is researching (with a vendor) a "paperless" title system for leased and rental car companies, 
plus lienholders. This program would eliminate the need to print thousands of titles yearly and reduce 
demands for duplicate titles. 

• Motorcycle license applicants who take the Department of Transportation motorcycle training 
course will no longer have to take the road test administered by DMV. (The number of motorcycle 
road tests should be reduced by 10,000 annually.) 

The department is aware of the acute deficiencies of the general information telephone system. The 
following steps have been taken to address this problem: 

• Staff has been increased to the maximum number of positions available in the phone center. 
(Retirements and hiring freezes prevented deploying adequate staffing earlier in the year.) 

• Developed a bid solicitation to upgrade the telecommunications technology installed in the phone 
unit. An improved system will be installed by late 1 992, with upgraded voice response and messaging 
capabilities for touch tone and rotary phones. 

• A second shift was added in the phone center. Beginning in September, DMV operators will be 
available from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. 

Research and Planning 

The Research and Planning Section, in addition to supporting other divisions, took the lead role in 
a number of innovative projects this year designed to introduce new technology to improve customer 
service. For example: 

• Investigating the feasibility of digital imaging technology as a means of storing, retrieving and 
disseminating photo license pictures and data (including magnetic stripes or bar codes for automati- 
cally extracting information from the license itself without having to key it in). 

• Researching the benefits of installing advanced work stations at branch office registry counters 
to expedite registration transactions, immediately update departmental computer files, and automati- 
cally record fee payments for bookkeeping purposes. 

• Examining Automated Teller Machine (ATM)/Kiosk technology as a means for the public to 
transact business with DMV off site without staff interface. 

Legal Services Division 

In addition to acting in an advisory capacity concerning motor vehicle laws and regulations, Legal 
Services develops and advocates legislative initiatives and monitors legislative activities; develops 
and pursues the adoption of regulations required by statute or initiated by DMV; monitors the 
implementation of new laws by the department; and conducts administrative hearings in numerous 
areas such as drunk driving arrests, fitness to hold a motor vehicle operator's license, franchising of 
new car dealers, and failure to maintain required no-fault insurance. The division holds over 7,000 
hearings per year. 

The division recently developed regulations revising the point system for motor vehicle operators 
who commit moving violations. High point violators will automatically receive a 30-day operator's 
license suspension, eliminating the need for an administrative hearing prior to suspension. 

New regulations defining standards for issuing an operator's license to persons with health 
problems also have been adopted and will assist DMV in making fair and appropriate licensing 
decisions with such citizens. 

Legal Services has assisted in negotiating and preparing an extension to contracts related to DM V's 
initiatives to improve customer service. Further assistance has been provided to negotiate and draft 
an extension for the current contract for Connecticut's vehicle emissions inspection program, which 
includes provision for future options in the program. Planning has commenced for a new contract to 
begin in 1995. Some other initiatives in progress include: 

• Proposed revisions of the statutes authorizing administrative suspensions for persons arrested for 
drunk driving, to permit the Administrative Per Se program to deal more effectively, consistently and 
fairly with such persons who request administrative hearings. 



MOTOR VEHICLES 125 



• Improved enforcement of motor vehicle registration requirements by summoning for hearing 
residents of the state who have a Connecticut operator's license but have their vehicles registered in 
other states. 

• Continued review of DM V statutory responsibilities to determine more effective and efficient 
procedures in areas such as sales and municipal property tax collection, passenger vehicle safety 
inspections, vehicle titles, complaints against licensed dealers and repairers, fatal accident suspen- 
sions, and revisions of standards and procedures for the licensing of drivers of public service vehicles, 
including school bus drivers. 

Commercial Vehicle Safety Division 

The primary responsibilities of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Division are to help ensure the 
safety of the motoring public on Connecticut's roads and highways. The division's accomplishments 
include: 

• In concert with the Federal Highway Administration and federal grant support, DMV embarked 
on a program of expanding commercial vehicle safety inspections at the weigh/inspection stations 
and rest stops across the state. By identifying the inspection vehicles with bright markings, DMV 
has made the trucking industry and the public more aware of their enforcement of commercial vehicle 
regulations. Working with other state agencies and local officials in lower Fairfield County, DMV 
opened the Greenwich weigh/inspection station in May 1992. 

• Designed a program for commercial motor vehicles that transport passengers, including strict 
monitoring visits by DMV Inspectors. 

• Implemented an ongoing criminal record check for drivers requiring public passenger transportation 
permits, i.e., school bus drivers. 

• Expanded the regulatory and oversight functions of the Commercial Driving School Unit to 
include driver education programs offered by secondary schools. 

Data Processing 
DMV's data processing resources are focused on introducing advanced technology to improve 
customer service and reduce employee processing time, extending and expanding current level 
technology to attain and maintain planned cost reductions while improving service objectives, 
developing new computer applications software to meet emerging and changing business needs, and 
operating and maintaining current systems which support the day-to-day agency operations. The 
unit's accomplishments include: 

• Successfully implemented the most complex, comprehensive change ever to the DMV's Business 
Information Systems required for Commercial Driver Licensing. 

• Implemented the use of bar code technology on license renewal applications which, through 
scanning, will reduce the time necessary to process renewals. 

• Negotiated a contract with American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators network 
(AAMVAnet) for the exchange of data between state agencies and other local, state and federal 
entities which will allow all users to reduce network communication costs. 

• Implemented Zip+4 addressing and bar coding of address information for high volume mailings, 
enabling DMV to get lower USPS rates. 

• Initiated the first step in meeting Harper Hull Report goals by starting the transfer of No- Fault 
Insurance Audit System computer operations to the state's data center. 

Human Resources 

The Human Resources Division has responded to the administration's goal for a more customer- 
friendly department by implementing new programs designed to enhance employee participation in 
the change process. 

Sixty-one employees took the state's early retirement package last year. The agency is currently 
hiring entry-level noncompetitive positions in our customer service areas to ease the strain caused by 
these departures. The division instituted an Employee of the Month Program to honor employees from 
branch offices and the central office for excellent service to DMV and the state. A program to honor 
employees for long service is slated to begin this year. In conjunction with the Personnel Development 
Center, DMV is completing its Service Excellence training for all branch employees and will begin 
training central office staff this year. Motor Vehicle inspectors are continuing their training at the 
Connecticut Police Academy where they undergo an intensive 15 -week law enforcement program. 
Training was provided to managers on two timely issues: sexual harassment and affirmative action. 

DMV undertook efforts to examine employee health and safety issues. Beginning in FY 92-93, 



126 MOTOR VEHICLES 



DM V will launch an extensive program to ensure a healthy and productive work environment for all 
employees. 

Affirmative Action 

DMV recognizes affirmative action as an immediate and necessary objective as it continues to 
provide equal employment opportunity regardless of race, color, sex, marital status, religion, age, 
national origin, ancestry, physical disability, present or past history of mental disorder, mental 
retardation or criminal record, as required by state and federal laws. This commitment underlies our 
goal for the full and fair participation of women, blacks, Hispanics, older persons, physically and 
mentally challenged and all other protected group members in the work force. It is DM V's policy not 
to do business knowingly with any contractor, subcontractor or supplier of materials who discriminates 
against protected class members. 

Driver Services Division 

DMV has adopted a "mail-in" restoration campaign for persons suspended for failure to honor a 
court summons. This affects 55,000 operators annually and will significantly reduce the walk-in 
traffic at DM V. The division adjusted the Insurance Audit Program to target those owners of vehicles 
who have at least five points assessed to their driving records. Approximately 43 percent of the owners 
contacted were referred for suspension action. 

Fiscal Services Division 

Fiscal Services Division devoted much of its time to these activities which enhance Departmental 
effectiveness: 

• Developed, automated and implemented revenue accounting, reporting and personal services 
budgeting system; 

• Developed an automated branch bookkeeping system; implemented a procurement review 
process; 

• Is implementing an automated time and attendance system. 

Special Investigations Division 

Special Investigations has the responsibility of investigating activity associated with all regulatory 
functions performed by the department. The division is involved in the investigation of unlicensed 
dealers and junkyards, body chop shops, emissions sticker misuse, licensing and registration fraud 
and internal affairs situations. 




REVENUE SERVICES 



Department of Revenue Services 

ALLAN A. CRYSTAL, Commissioner 

Stephen F. Furman, Deputy Commissioner 

Katalin Preier, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1901 Statutory authority - Sec. 12-1 

Central office - 92 Farmington Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06105 

Average number of full-time employees - 900 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $42,760,265 

Capital outlay - $251,078 

Organization structure - Administration, Appellate, Audit, 

Collections and Enforcement, Information Services, Inheritance, 

Legal, Operations, and Taxpayer Services 

• 

The Audit Division performed approximately 96,000 field and office audits of selected 
taxpayers and administered continuing compliance, enforcement and control programs for all 
Connecticut state taxes. The division generated over $264.5 million in additional assessments, which 
is a 13 percent increase over the projections for the fiscal year. The division worked extensively on 
the establishment and implementation of the Connecticut Personal Income Tax. Extensive interaction 
continued with other Connecticut state agencies, the tax agencies of other states and the federal 
government on various audit, compliance, educational and information programs. 

The Collection & Enforcement Division collected $109,328,629 in overdue tax revenue. This 
exceeded the amount forecast for the fiscal year by nine percent. The faltering Northeast economy has 
had an enormous impact on the division's efforts to collect delinquent tax debts. Business failures 
continued to climb, as illustrated by a 24 percent increase in the number of bankruptcy claims filed 
by the department. Last fiscal year 8,692 overdue accounts required some type of enforcement 
response, e.g., tax warrant, permit suspension hearing or tax Hen, to bring them into compliance. This 
number increased to 1 0,0 1 7 or 1 5 percent over the same period last year . There were 111 arrests made 
compared to 84 the previous fiscal year. 

The Taxpayer Services Division delivered assistance to taxpayers in a number of ways. The 
division responded to 508,143 telephone inquiries and provided tax information 24 hours a day 
through the use of taped tax messages on the agency's telecommunications network. CONN-TAX, 
the Department's automated telephone system, was put into operation in February, 1992. CONN- 
TAX includes pre-recorded telephone messages on state income tax, as well as individualized refund 
information. This system operates 24 hours a day. 

Going hand-in-hand with this effort was the inauguration by the commissioner's office of a 
department computer bulletin board, and a fax -on-demand forms retrieval system, both "firsts" for 
state tax agencies. 

The Appellate Division is responsible for responding to and resolving taxpayer appeals through 
informal and formal hearings. The division continues to streamline its operating procedures, and 
improve its service to taxpayers and their representatives, while continuing to resolve the over 1,800 
appeals it receives annually in a timely fashion. For fiscal 1992, 1,981 cases were resolved, yielding 
$94 million in revenue. 

In the Administration Division, the Central Mail Unit processed over 4.2 million pieces of 
incoming mail and more than 6. 1 million pieces of outgoing mail. The petty cash fund provided 901 
travel advances. The business office received 1,984 purchase requisitions, resulting in issuance of 1, 
234 purchase orders . The Central Reprographic Unit printed and prepared over 14.7 million forms 
for distribution. The Forms Management Unit revised or created 366 forms. There were 106 tons of 
white paper recycled. The agency contracted out for the printing and mailing of 2.75 million income 
tax booklets. The average number of full-time employees is 900. The recurring operating expenses 
came to $42,760,265 and the capital outlay was $251,078. 

The Operations Division maintains the internal accounting of all state revenue and administers 
programs to ensure the accuracy and validity of all taxpayer information on the agency income tax 
return processing system, the master business data base computer system and the deposit journal 
information control system. The Operations Division was directly involved in the successful 
implementation of the new state income tax including: the processing and depositing of tax payments, 



128 



REVENUE SERVICES 129 



the processing of all related tax returns, the issuance of refund checks and the issuance of bills. During 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1992, the Operations Division: 

• processed 4.3 million tax returns and 195,202 applications. 

• processed and deposited 1.76 million checks totaling $5.8 billion dollars. 

• issued 636,965 refunds totaling $215.4 million dollars. 

• processed and resolved 17,379 requests for penalty waivers. 

• issued 530,21 1 motor carrier decals generating $5.4 million dollars. 

The Information Services Division was instrumental in the design and implementation of the 
Personal Income Tax Processing System. This includes the system for handling withholding and 
prepayment returns. Information Services determined that the Department of Revenue Services 
would be best served by directing that the software consultant would develop and test and Income Tax 
Processing System utilizing Local Area Network. An appropriate number of personal computers, and 
support software including Realia COBOL and Realia CICS were purchased toward this end. 
Computer processing cost savings realized by this decision were in excess of $100,000. 



1 30 REVENUE SERVICES 



Gaming Policy Board 
Division of Special Revenue 

DEMETRIOS LOUZIOTIS, SR., Executive Director 

Linda J. Yelmini, Deputy Executive Director 

Established - 1971 Statutory authority - Chap. 226 and 226b 

Central office - 555 Russell Rd., Newington, Conn. 06111 

Average number of full-time employees - 426 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 $35,127,243 

Capital outlay - $71,000 

Organization structure - Office of the Executive Director, Lottery Unit, Off-Track 

Betting Unit, Gambling Regulation Unit, Administration Unit, Licensing and 

Integrity Assurance Unit, Planning and Research Unit, and Security Unit 

• 

The 1991-92 fiscal year was the thirteenth in which the Gaming Policy Board and Division of 
Special Revenue regulated and administered legalized gaming activities in Connecticut 
pursuant to the provisions of Conn. Gen. Statutes Chap. 226 and 226b. It was also the twelfth year in 
which the board and division have operated under the Department of Revenue Services (for 
administrative purposes only.) 

Members of the Gaming Policy Board during the year were: Edward Kratovil, Darien, chairman; 
John T. MacDonald, Pomfret Center; Nelson C. L. Brown, Wethersfield; Robert G. Mooney, East 
Windsor; and Carroll Dunham, Lyme. Mr. Dunham, resigned from the board in June. Demetrios 
Louziotis, executive director, served as a member of the board ex officio. 

A total of $1,036,365,000 was wagered by participants in legal gaming activities as follows: 
$175,285,000 at off-track betting facilities; $259,360,000 at the greyhound and jai alai parimutuel 
facilities; $41,049,000 from Bingo and Sealed tickets sales; $543,685,000 represented lottery sales. 

Transfers to the general fund totaled $253,721,000. An additional $173,000 was generated for the 
general fund as the result of fines, fees and licenses. 

During the year, the Gaming Policy Board convened twelve regular and three special meetings. 
Among actions taken, the board approved the appointments of Richard Krupke, unitheadof Licensing 
and Integrity Assurance and Susan White, unit head of Lottery; approved a recommendation to place 
the administration of off-track betting under the responsibility of the unit head of Gambling 
Regulation; approved a four-month contract with Auto -Management for the operation of off-track 
betting; approved a five-year extension with AmTote International, Inc. for computer support for the 
on-line lottery games; approved contracts with companies such as Canada Life Insurance, Great West 
Life and Annuity Insurance Company and others to purchase annuities to fund high tier lottery prizes; 
approved annual performance dates for Hartford, Milford and Bridgeport Jai Alai frontons and the 
Plainfield Greyhound Park; approved contracts with Churchill Downs, Hollywood Park, Hialeah 
Racetrack and Oakwood Jockey Club, among other organizations concerning the transmittal of racing 
information for races of national interest for use in Connecticut's off-track betting operations. 

Lottery sales for the year totaled a record $543,685,000, $221,300,000 was transferred to the 
general fund and $288,613,000 was awarded in prizes. The breakdown by game follows: 



Game 


Sales 


To General Fund 


Prizes Awarded 


Daily/Play 


$195,228,000 


$ 88,200,000 


$ 93,301,000 


Lotto 


219,794,000 


93,150,000 


116,221,000 


Cash Lotto 


8,911,000 


1,200,000 


6,777,000 


Instant 


119,752,000 


38,750,000 


72,314,000 


Total 


$543,685,000 


$221,300,000 


$288,613,000 



Since its inception, the lottery has generated total sales in excess of $5, 1 89,000,000, has transferred 
over $2,241,000,000 to the General Fund and has awarded over $2,634,000,000 in prizes. To date, 
over 401 people have won prizes of $1,000,000 or more. 

The Gambling Regulation Unit is responsible for regulation of the sport of jai alai, the operation 
of greyhound racing, the operation of charitable gaming and the operation of off-track betting. During 
the year, the unit out-posted inspectors of the Ledyard Fox wood Casino operated by the Mashantucket 
Pequot Indians. This function was eliminated in June due to budgetary constraints. 

Connecticut Yankee Greyhound Racing, Inc. of Plainfield (Plainfield Greyhound Park) operated 
from July 2, 1991 - December 30, 1991 and from January 1, 1992 - June 30, 1992. A total of 591,201 



REVENUE SERVICES 131 

patrons attended 449 performances (176 evening, 32 twilight and 241 matinee) at this facility and 
wagered $72,992,000. A total of $59,325,000 was returned to the public, $8,663,000 to the 
association. A total of $5,014,000 was transferred to the general fund. The Town of Plainfield received 
a total of $364,960 in parimutuel taxes. 

Berenson Parimutuel, Inc. of Hartford (Berensons' Hartford Jai Alai) operated from July 2, 1991 
- December 29, 1991 and from January 1, 1992 - June 30, 1992. A total of 419,176 patrons attended 
361 performances (252 evening, 109 matinee) at this facility and wagered $66,291,000. A total of 
$59,325,000 was returned to the public, $7,537,000 to the association and $3,855,000 was transferred 
to the general fund. The city of Hartford realized a total of $662,920 in parimutuel taxes. 

Bridgeport Jai Alai, Inc. of Bridgeport (Bridgeport Jai Alai) operated from December 1, 1991 - 
December 31, 1991 and from January 1, 1992- June 4, 1992. A total of 344, 074 patrons attended 240 
performances (134 evening, 106 matinee) at this facility and wagered $56,899,000. A total of 
$46,647,000 was returned to the public, $6,433,000 to the association and $3,304,000 was transferred 
to the general fund. The city of Bridgeport was the recipient of $568,988 in parimutuel taxes. 

Connecticut Jai Alai, Inc. of Milford (Milford Jai Alai) operated from July 1, 1991 - November 30, 
1991 and from June 5, 1992 - June 30, 1992. A total of 437,284 patrons attended 233 performances 
(102 evening, 131 matinee) at this facility and wagered $63,178,000. A total of $51,657,000 was 
returned to the public, $7,217,000 to the association and $3,672,000 was transferred to the general 
fund. The city of Milford received a total of $63 1,777 in parimutuel taxes. 

Additionally, proceeds from unredeemed parimutuel tickets (outs tickets) outstanding for more 
than one year amounting to $676,228 were transferred to the general fund. 

The division, through its Gambling Regulation Unit, has monitored a total of 27,090 tests of urine 
specimens of greyhounds at Plainfield Greyhound Park for prohibited medication during the fiscal 
year. Fines were levied on occupational licensees totaling $13,737 for violations of parimutuel rules 
and regulations after appropriate administrative hearings as follows: Greyhound racing, 64 fines 
totaling $5,665; jai alai, 52 fines were imposed totaling $5,247 at Berensons' Hartford Jai Alai, 9 fines 
totaling $625 at Bridgeport Jai Alai, and 14 fines totaling $2,200 at Milford Jai Alai. 

The Gambling Regulation Unit's Charitable Game Section has completed its fifth year of 
regulating gaming activities conducted by charitable organizations. During the period the following 
activity occurred: 

Organization Registrations/Permits Issued 

53 Bingo registrations; 553 permits 
413 Sealed Tickets permits 
1 ,607 B azaar and Raffle permits 

21 Games of Chance registration; 104 permits 
8 Recreational Bingo for senior citizens registrations 

Individuals Sales Permits Issued 
2,147 Bingo 
1,252 Sealed Ticket 

4 Games of Chance equipment operators 

Equipment Dealer Permits Issued 

1 1 Bazaar and Raffle 
4 Games of Chances 

A total of $87,585 has been collected in permit fees from all charitable gaming activities. 
Organizations authorized to conduct Bingo generated $30,491,000 in gross receipts and $7,359,000 
in net profit and $434,176 in taxes payable to the state. Pursuant to Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 7- 169c, 
effective January 1, 1989, recreational bingo for senior citizens was authorized for any organization 
whose membership consists of persons 60 years of age or over. Thirty organizations have been 
registered to conduct such activity. A total of 19,801,146 sealed tickets were distributed with a retail 
value of $10,658,000. These tickets will generate $2,822,482 in revenue for the charitable organiza- 
tions selling them and have returned $ 1 ,065,859 to the state. Organizations conducting the raffles and 
bazaars reported $16,449,000 in gross receipts and $9,582,000 in net profit while those conducting 
games of chance or Las Vegas nights reported $438,579 in gross receipts and $191,344 in net profit. 

The major development in Off -Track Betting's sixteenth year of operation was the March 1 , 1992 
change in vendor from AmTote International to Auto -Management. The total system handle for the 
year was $175,285,000. Of this amount, $133,452,000 was returned to the public; $8,383,000 was 



1 32 REVENUE SERVICES 



paid to racetracks; $6,447,000 for totalizator and related services; and $1,753,000 was paid to host 
municipalities in accordance with Public Act 86-3 18. Transfers to the general fund totaled $14,400,000. 

When the vendor changed, Teletrack closed and a teletheater was opened in the New Haven 
Coliseum. The overall activity in New Haven for the year was: Performances Patrons Wagers July 
1, 1991 to February 29, 1992 405 183,324 $34,799,000 March 1, 1992 to June 30, 1992 206 33,619 
$ 6,659,000. In its second year of operation the Bradley Teletheater in Windsor Locks offered 611 
performances, with 210,390 patrons wagering $43,958,000. On November 1, 1991 Plainfield 
greyhound opened its Off -Track Betting simulcast facility, which produced $9,600,000 in handle. 
The branches and telephone betting combined generated $80,269,000 in handle. 

The Licensing and Integrity Assurance Unit is responsible for performing vital accounting 
functions for all gaming operations, the settlement of all lottery claims, and the issuance of 
occupational licenses to employees of parimutuel facilities, lottery and off-track betting services. 
During the year, the unit completed annual audits at Milford Jai Alai for the fiscal years ended 
December 31, 1990 and December 31, 1989. Audits at Bridgeport Jai Alai for the fiscal years ended 
December 3 1 , 199 1 and December 31,1 990 and Hartford Jai Alai for the fiscal year ended December 
31, 1991 and December 31, 1990 are in progress. In addition, the unit completed reviews of the 
nonproprietary capital expenditures made in connection with the Off -Track Betting System from 
October 28, 1990 through April 28, 1991, and the operating revenues and expenses incurred from 
April 28, 1990 through February 28, 1992 by its Off-Track Betting vendor. 

The unit's Licensing Section administered the issuance of 6,55 1 occupational licenses, with license 
fees totaling $41,030. An additional 3,233 licenses were issued for employees of the Fox wood Casino. 
Jai Alai, dog racing and teletrack performance fees totaling $167,685 were collected in accordance 
with the provisions of Public Act No. 86-312 and deposited in the Chronic Gamblers Treatment and 
Rehabilitation Fund. 

The Planning and Research Unit continued its role in the coordination and support of all long-range 
planning for the agency; providing planning and monitoring assistance, as well as support to a host 
of agency-wide projects undertaken during the year; oversight and support to the administrative 
hearing process at the division and board level. The unit coordinated a study of legalized gaming 
requested by the governor, which also met the statutory requirements for a study concerning the socio- 
economic impact of gaming which must be performed every five years. In addition, the research 
efforts of the unit have contributed to critical decision-making by providing impact estimates and 
decision analyses on a wide variety of issues. 

During fiscal year 1991-92, the Security Unit initiated 260 investigations, involving both criminal 
and administrative violations pertaining to legalized gaming operations. Additionally, 11 referrals 
were made to the Legalized Gambling Investigative Unit of the state police. The unit is responsible 
for maintaining the integrity of legalized gaming operations administered and regulated by the 
division; providing support services to all other units within the division; maintaining cooperative 
working relationships with the Legalized Gambling Investigative Unit of the state police and the 
Office of the Chief State's Attorney. 

The division's Administration Unit continued to perform the support functions of budget prepa- 
ration and management, purchasing, internal accounting, data processing, and buildings and grounds 
management. 

During 1991-92, the division benefited from the volunteer services of 44 senior citizens, who 
contributed 132 hours of service, valued in excess of $550 to support special, sales agent drawings 
in Connecticut's Instant Lottery. 

In compliance with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 46a-78, the Division of Special Revenue and all 
contractors, subcontractors and licensees with whom the division does business are strongly 
committed to provide equal opportunities in employment to all qualified persons solely on the basis 
of job related skills, ability and merit. The division continues to take affirmative action in its 
employment practices giving applicants and employees equal treatment, without regard to race, color, 
religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disorder (past/present history), age, 
blindness, marital status, mental retardation and criminal record. Such actions include but are not 
limited to employment, upgrading, demotion or transfer; recruitment or recruitment advertising; 
layoff or termination; rates of pay or other forms of compensation and selection for training including 
apprenticeship. The Division of Special Revenue did not knowingly do business with any bidder, 
contractor, subcontractor, or supplier of materials who discriminates against members of any class 
protected under Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 4-1 14a as amended by Sec. 8 of Public Act No. 83-559. 




BANKING 



Department of Banking 



RALPH M. SHULANSKY - Commissioner 

Barbara S. McGrath - Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1837 Statutory authority - Title 36 as amended 

Central office - 44 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 159 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $10,002,937 

Organization structure - Administrative Division, 

Bank and Credit Union Regulation Division, Consumer Credit Division, 

Securities, and Business Investments Division 

• 

The Department of Banking is responsible for the regulation and examination of financial 
institutions and various related entities chartered, licensed, or registered by the state. The 
purpose of such regulation is to monitor the safety and soundness of institutions falling within the 
jurisdiction of the department in a manner that accommodates the public. The banking commissioner 
is also charged with administering the securities, tender offers, and business opportunity laws, the 
Truth-in-Lending Act and other consumer credit laws, the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, and a 
major portion of the Act Concerning Security Deposits pertaining to rents. In addition to its regulatory 
and administrative functions, the department responds to inquiries, investigates complaints, and 
compiles and disseminates financial data relating to regulated entities. 



^^!jj^^^gtfip^v|sed in I99J+92 



mm 



j»ne3<u«m jmmwm 



State bank and trust companies 

Trust departments of state bank and 
trust companies 

Savings banks 

Trust departments of savings banks 
Savings banks life insurance 

departments 

Savings and loan associations 

Credit unions 

Small loan licensees 

Sales finance licensees 

Collection agencies 

Secondary mortgage licensees 

First mortgage licensees 

Debt adjusters 

Broker-dealers 

B roker-dealer agents 

Broker-dealer branch offices 

Investment advisors 

Investment advisor agents 

Agent of issuer 

Secutities registrations 

Business opportunity registrations 

Money order and travelers' check 

licensees 

Check cashing licensees 

Bank holding companies 

*Branch data as of YE 1991 



48 
(285 branches) 

11 

61 
(530 branches) 
10 



22 



38 
(192 branches) * 

11 

56 

(517 branches) * 

12 

22 



(10 branches) 


(5 branche 


91 


97 


48 


55 


165 


185 


247 


222 


548 


596 


364 


365 


1 


1 


1,499 


1,557 


48,663 


50,984 


431 


528 


612 


757 


3,586 


5,274 


119 


130 


4,166 


5,033 


96 


91 


18 


22 


23 


24 


46 


42 



Regulatory Function 

The department main- 
tains a separate Banking 
Fund. All department ex- 
penditures are covered by 
assessments and fees lev- 
ied against institutions and 
individuals licensed and 
regulated by the banking 
commissioner. Fees and 
assessments collected to- 
taled $11,064,759 for 
1991-92. 

Administrative 
Division 

The Administrative 
Division establishes the 
policies and basic guide- 
lines for the overall man- 
agement of the depart- 
ment, to administer, di- 
rect, supervise, control 
and support the operations 
of examining, licensing 
and registering of 
Connecticut's financial 
and related institutions. 

Bank Examination 
Division 

The B ank Examination 
Division is responsible for 
the supervision of state- 
chartered bank and trust 



134 



BANKING 135 



companies, savings banks and savings and loan associations. This division also licenses money 
forwarders and check cashers and has responsibility for analyzing branch applications, acquisitions, 
mergers, conversions, and new bank applications. The division also registers and supervises bank 
holding companies. 

A substantial number of Connecticut's banking institutions fell prey to the allure of big profits from 
overzealous commercial real estate lending in the mid-1980s and the downturn in the economy that 
followed. Twenty -one banking institutions failed during 1991-92, 1 6 of which were state-chartered. 

Regarding the formation of new banks, a Temporary Certificate of Authority was issued to the 
Simsbury Bank & Trust Company on March 24, 1 992. An application for the formation of Canterbury 
Bank and Trust Company, New Milford, was withdrawn without prejudice on August 1, 1991. 

Other significant activity within the division included the approval of nine bank branch applications 
and approvals for "Cargill Bank of Connecticut, a savings and loan association" to change its name 
to Cargill Bank of Connecticut and Bank of Stamford to change its name to Fairfield County Trust 
Company. As of June 30, 1992, an application for the merger of The Dime Savings Bank of 
Wallingford with City Savings Bank of Meriden under the name of The Dime Savings Bank of 
Wallingford was pending. 

Credit Union Division 

This division examines and supervises state-chartered credit unions and meets with officers and 
directors of each credit union to review the findings of the examination report. The division also offers 
assistance to new credit unions in an effort to ensure that directors, officers and committees understand 
their responsibilities and obligations under the law. 

As of June 30,1 992, there were 85 state-chartered credit unions licensed and operating as nonprofit, 
nonstock corporations in Connecticut. All share accounts in credit unions chartered by this state are 
federally insured to $100,000 per account by the National Credit Union Administration, a federal 
agency. 

During 1991-1992, four credit unions were merged and two credit unions were placed into 
receivership. As of June 30, 1992, an application was pending to charter anew credit union in Hartford 
to be known as the West Indian Credit Union, Inc. Share draft programs have been authorized in 23 
of the state-chartered credit unions. 

Securities and Business Investments Division 

The division's administrative jurisdiction relates to the securities, business opportunity and tender 
offer laws. The division is headed by a division director, who is assisted by two assistant directors and 
a chief examiner. 

The Securities Registration Section reviews and processes applications for securities, business 
opportunity and tender offer registration. It reviewed 2,271 initial and 2,762 renewal securities 
offerings and 9 1 initial and renewal business opportunity programs . In addition, the section processed 
1,488 securities exemption filings. 

The Broker-Dealer and Investment Adviser Registration Section reviews and processes applica- 
tions for the registration of broker-dealers, broker-dealer agents, investment advisers, investment 
adviser agents, and agents of issuers wishing to transact business in Connecticut. During 1991-92, 
there were 60,978 registrants, representing an increase from the previous fiscal year. In addition, the 
section conducted 82 examinations of main offices and branch offices of Connecticut registered 
broker-dealers and investment advisors. 

The Enforcement Sectionis charged with investigating and initiating action against persons alleged 
to have violated the Connecticut Uniform Securities Act or the Connecticut Business Opportunity 
Investment Act. One hundred and forty-nine securities investigations and 78 business opportunity 
investigations were opened during 1991-92. Many of the investigations were a result of written 
complaints received from the public. In conjunction with its investigative function, 41 securities 
subpoenas and four business opportunity subpoenas were issued. Four cease-and-desist orders 
(naming 1 6 parties) were issued relating to securities matters, and six cease-and-desist orders (naming 
18 parties) were issued relating to business opportunity matters. 

The banking commissioner signed 38 stipulation and settlement agreements and four consent 
orders (naming four parties) with respect to securities issues. Also, one order revoking registration 
was issued regarding securities matters. 

The banking commissioner also referred one securities matter (involving six parties) and two 
business opportunity matters (involving two parties) to the Office of the Attorney General. Two 
securities matters (involving four parties) were referred to the Office of the Chief State's Attorney. 



136 BANKING 



Consumer Credit Division 

This division is responsible for the licensing and regulation of small loan companies, sales finance 
companies, first and second mortgage brokers and lenders, consumer collection agencies, and debt 
adjusters. It is also responsible for enforcement of the state's Truth- in-Lending law as well as a 
number of other laws related to consumer credit. 

As part of its enforcement activities, the division responds to a large number of consumer inquiries. 
During the year the division conducted 3 80 examinations of businesses subject to the state's consumer 
credit laws and received 1,773 written inquiries related to consumer credit matters. In addition, the 
division's staff received 13,636 telephone inquiries. 

Public Outreach 

The department places a high priority on public outreach. The banking commissioner, deputy 
commissioner and other staff members have frequently addressed groups throughout the state, 
participated in conferences and workshops, and have provided testimony to federal and state 
legislators dealing with the many new issues that concern both consumers and the industry. 

Each department division has assigned personnel and established procedures so that complaints 
and inquiries are responded to promptly. Complaints alleging discriminatory or other illegal practices 
are investigated and appropriate administrative action is taken in a timely manner. Landlord-tenant 
disputes concerning the return of security deposits are mediated and legal remedies may be sought in 
the event of violations. 

The department has undertaken various educational efforts to help the public understand services 
provided in the financial marketplace and recognize fraudulent investment offers. Television public 
service announcements and informational publications have been produced, Investor Alerts have 
been periodically disseminated, and a Securities Bulletin highlighting enforcement measures taken 
by the department's Securities and Business Investments Division published. An annual Securities 
Forum was organized to provide timely information and advice to industry representatives and 
interested citizens. A pamphlet is also available on rent security deposits explaining key tenant- 
landlord issues. A report on the financial condition of depository institutions is compiled, analyzed 
and published annually. 

Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action 

The Department of B anking is deeply committed to implementing the letter and spirit of affirmative 
action, equal employment opportunity and contract compliance. The department's annual Affirma- 
tive Action Plan was approved by the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. The 
department's progress in the attainment of affirmative goals is evidenced by the following data for 
1991-1992: 

Females comprised 52 percent of the total work force. Black persons comprised 14 percent; six 
percent were Hispanic. Other race persons made up five percent of the total work force. In addition, 
the department employs several physically disabled individuals and 40 percent of the total work force 
is over age 40. 

The department continues to pursue aggressive and innovative recruitment strategies and external 
outreach programs including high school and college internships and orientation programs. 




INSURANCE 



Insurance Department 

ROBERT R. GOOGINS, Commissioner 
William J. Gilligan, Deputy Commissioner 
Established - 1865 Statutory authority - Title 38a 
Office Mailing Address - P.O. Box 816, Hartford, Conn. 06142-0816 
Office location - 153 Market St., 11th Floor, Hartford, Conn. 
Average number of full-time employees - 74 
Recurring operating expenses - 1990-91 - $5,160,583 
Capital outlay - $965,717 
Organization structure - Administration Division, Life and Health Division, Licens- 
ing and Investigations Division, Property and Casualty Division, Examination 
Division, Market Conduct Division, and Consumer Affairs Division 

• 

The Insurance Department regulates the insurance industry in accordance with four fundamental 
regulatory objectives: (1) the continued solvency of insurance companies and insurance- 
related entities so that they may faithfully discharge their contractual obligations to their policyhold- 
ers and claimants; (2) the maintenance of a stable market for insurance at affordable rates; (3) the 
continued licensing of trustworthy and competent agents, brokers and adjusters; and (4) the fair, just 
and equitable treatment of policyholders and claimants by those persons and entities regulated by the 
Insurance Department. 

Legal Services/Receiverships & Guaranty Funds 

This office directs the receivership and guaranty funds activity of the department and provides legal 
advice and related services to the commissioner and the six divisions of the Insurance Department on 
a broad spectrum of issues that arise in regulating the insurance industry. The legal staff of this office 
also drafts, monitors and analyzes legislation; drafts and promulgates regulations; and participates in 
department hearings involving rates, license enforcement, and acquisitions of domestic insurance 
companies. The Legal Division during the year promulgated five regulations, assisted department 
divisions in 40 administrative enforcement proceedings or stipulated settlements that resulted in the 
assessment of $ 149,825 in fines and penalties, assisted with seven insurance rate hearings, one hearing 
on the acquisition of control of a Connecticut-domiciled insurer, and two hearings on appeals from 
decisions of residual market mechanisms. This office also coordinated the review, hearing and 
approval of the application of Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company to redomesticate to New York 
and merge with Home Life Insurance Company. Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 38a- 13 requires that this 
report to the Governor reflect the names of companies involved in receivership proceedings. As 
described below, the Insurance Commissioner served as the liquidator of one health maintenance 
organization and served as ancillary receiver of seven insurers domiciled in other states. 

The Insurance Commissioner was appointed Liquidator of Liberty Health Plans, Inc. ("Liberty") 
of Naugatuck, Connecticut on April 25, 1989. Liberty was an HMO which served more than 10,000 
members in the Greater Waterbury area. During the year the liquidator completed payment of all Class 
1 claims which totaled $47,577. 19 and $2,5 10,809.62 in Class 3 claims which were comprised of the 
claims of participating providers, non-participating providers and individual Liberty members. 
Because the liquidator ended the year with $87,617.39 in total receivership assets remaining, steps 
were initiated to seek the approval of the Superior Court to make a second and final distribution to 
Liberty claimants. The commissioner, in the discharge of his statutory duties as liquidator, has taken 
all lawful steps to maximize the amount of money to be returned to subscribers and creditors of 
Liberty. On August 7, 1986, the Insurance Commissioner was appointed ancillary receiver of Allied 
Fidelity Insurance Company, an Indiana insurance company that was placed in liquidation on July 1 5 , 
1986. During the year, the ancillary receivers obtained the approval of the Superior Court to pay 
$500,000 in full and final settlement of one claim filed in the amount of $640,000 once the United 
States government releases its priority claim filed against the receivership assets. 

On April 26, 1989, the Insurance Commissioner was appointed ancillary receiver of American 
Mutual Liability Insurance Company (AMLICO) and American Mutual Insurance Company of 
Boston (AMI), both domiciled in Massachusetts and placed in liquidation on March 9, 1989. During 
the year, the ancillary receiver entered into an agreement with the permanent receiver of AMLICO 

138 



INSURANCE 



139 



and AMI whereby investment income earned since January 1, 1989 attributable to the Connecticut 
special deposits will be reallocated between the domiciliary and Connecticut ancillary estates, subject 
to the approval of the Superior Court and domiciliary court. 

In November 1989, the Insurance Commissioner was appointed ancillary receiver of Enterprise 

Insurance Company (EIC), Mission Insurance Company (MIC), and Mission National Insurance 

'ompany (MNIC), California companies under liquidation. During the year the commissioner 

completed the final distribution of ancillary receivership assets to the Calif omialnsurance Commissioner 

as liquidator for these companies and the ancillary receiverships were terminated. 

On May 21, 1991, the Insurance Commissioner filed with the Superior Court a petition for his 
ippointment as ancillary receiver of Western Employers Insurance Company and to take possession 
)f $2.5 millionof assets of the insolvent insurer for the benefit of workers' compensation policyholders 
and claimants. Western Employers is a California-domiciled insurer that was placed in liquidation on 
April 19, 1991 . During the year claimants were given an opportunity to file claims against the assets 
of the ancillary receivership. 

Administration Division 

The Administration Division, through its Business Administration office, is responsible for all 
functions relating to budget and fiscal services. These services include: preparation and administration 
of the budget; payroll preparation; personnel administration; development of the department's 
affirmative action plan; and payment of all expenditures necessary for operation of the department. 
The Business Office collects and deposits all proceeds due the department from fees generated from 



1991 Calendar Year Premiums Written io Connecticut 


Individual Life 


$1,022,372,623 


Individual Annuities 


651,817,302 


Group Life 


287,068,725 


Group Annuities 


156,225,557 


Credit Life 


14,352,896 


Industrial Life 


24,380 


Accident & Health - Group 


4,366,533,598 


Accident & Health - Individual 


492,939,376 


Workers' Compensation 


725,523,166 


Automobile ■ Private Passenger 


1,629,918,903 


Automobile - Commercial 


295,305,887 


Title 


35,470,929 


Homeowners Multi-Peril 


380,858,715 


Commercial Multi-Peril 


362,591,980 


Medical Malpractice 


100,759,738 


Other Liability 


400,860,174 


All Other Property-Casualty 


398,977,451 


Surplus Lines 


97,963,147 


Total Premiums 


11,419,564,547 



insurance companies, agents, brokers and adjusters. During the year, $6,215,898 was collected in 
various fees and $2,875,192 was collected from the 4 percent premium tax levied on surplus line 
insurers. Expenses billed and recovered from Connecticut-based insurance companies for assessment 
of the cost of the Insurance Department were $7,928,712. 



Life and Health Division 

This division reviews all group and individual life and health insurance policies that are delivered 
or issued for delivery in this state by licensed insurance companies. 

These policy forms must be approved by the department prior to their being offered for sale. The 
policies are reviewed to see that they are in compliance with the General Statutes and regulations 
governing life and health forms. The division also processes requests for rate increases on individual 
accident and health policies. 



140 INSURANCE 



The division receives and responds to telephone calls and written inquiries concerning the technical 
aspects of life and health insurance coverage. 

The division is responsible for reviewing the applications of those firms that wish to establish 
alternative care delivery systems in Connecticut that are known as Health Maintenance Organizations 
(HMOs). All financial aspects of the operations of the HMOs are monitored by the division 
subsequent to approval of the application, including the rates to be used. 

There were eleven HMOs in Connecticut at the end of the 1991-92 fiscal year with approximately 
574,000 enrollees. 

Licensing and Investigations Division 

This division is responsible for ensuring that only competent and trustworthy persons are licensed 
to perform insurance activities in Connecticut. This is performed by developing and maintaining up 
to date educational standards and examinations for all license applications and the issuing and 
renewing of licenses to qualified applicants. 

Educational standards and examinations are developed and monitored by this division for all 
educational courses, study materials and instructors used in conjunction with approved pre-license 
training programs required by Conn. Gen. Statutes. 

There are approximately 100 pre-license training courses approved in this state. Courses are 
approved for insurance companies, educational institutions, insurance associations, insurance training 
schools and insurance publishing companies. 

The licensing division also determines the acceptable qualifications for all applicants applying for 
licenses in nine different categories and is responsible for issuing and renewing licenses in accordance 
with Conn. Gen. Statutes. At the present time, 217,917 licenses, to sell all forms of insurance, have 
been issued to 45,106 insurance agents. In addition, there are currently 6,704 licensed insurance 
brokers, 4,840 casualty adjusters, 1,543 motor vehicle physical damage appraisers, 154 fraternal 
agents, 153 excess lines brokers, 526 certified insurance consultants, 132 public adjusters, and 38 
premium finance companies. 

This year the division received 44,202 agent license applications. In total, the division received 
46,211 applications for license in nine different categories. 

This year license examinations were administered to 9,233 individuals seeking licenses to sell or 
service insurance in this state. The division issued approximately 7,362 letters of certification for 
resident licensees to obtain a similar license in other states. Licenses are issued to resident and non- 
resident applicants. 

The division receives and responds to approximately 50,000 phone calls per year. This year the 
division generated in excess of 5 million dollars to the general fund of this state. 

Examination Division 

The principal function of this division is to monitor the solvency of the insurers licensed to transact 
the business of insurance in the state of Connecticut. "Insurer" includes life insurance companies; 
property casualty insurance companies; mortgage guaranty insurance companies; health care centers, 
fraternal benefit societies, and life insurance departments of savings banks. 

Each licensed insurer is required to submit annually to the division, a statement of its financial 
condition and a summary of all business transacted during the preceding calendar year. On March 1, 
1991, annual statements were filed by 1,047 insurers that were licensed as of December 31, 1991. A 
company's license is renewed only if its financial condition, as reported in its annual statement, 
demonstrates its continued ability to meet policyholder obligations. 

During the calendar year 1 99 1 , 37 insurers' licenses were amended granting them authority to write 
additional lines of insurance; 6 insurers' licenses were restricted as a result of action by the 
department. On June 30, 1992, 1 ,049 insurers were licensed to do business in Connecticut. During the 
fiscal year 1991-1992, 138 conferences were held with insurers to discuss their operations. 

On-site financial condition examinations remain one of the most important components of 
regulatory supervision and solvency monitoring. Recognizing that these examinations may overlap 
with those performed by internal auditors and independent public accountants, procedures for office 
and field examinations were revised in 1992 to provide for more effective financial monitoring. A 
financial analysis unit reports to a supervisory examiner, performs desk audits of the financial 
statements of every licensed company on quarterly basis and reviews all other filings submitted to the 
division. Recommendations of the accounts, transactions and items which should be reviewed by the 
field examination unit, under the direction of a supervisory examiner, during the regularly scheduled 
financial condition examination of each Connecticut domiciled company, are made by the financial 
analysis unit. 






INSURANCE 141 



Connecticut statutes require insurers to be examined at least once every five years. Domestic 
insurers must furnish the other states with a report of examination to continue doing business outside 
Connecticut. Connecticut chartered insurers are examined on a "targeted" or "limited" basis unless 
the financial analysis unit indicates a potential problem may exist and a comprehensive examination 
is required. Examinations of 35 insurers including 4 organizational examinations of newly chartered 
Connecticut companies were conducted during 1991-92. 

A license from the Insurance Commissioner is required to do an insurance business in Connecticut. 
The Examination Division processes applications from foreign companies desiring admission to this 
state. On January 1, 1991, there were 136 applications pending. During 1991 38 new applications were 
received, 29 companies were licensed to write business in Connecticut, and 1 1 applications were 
rejected. There were 134 foreign applications pending on December 31, 1991. In addition, six 
Connecticut domiciled companies were licensed to transact business during 1991. 

Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 38a-77 requires the Insurance Commissioner to value the reserves held 
by domestic companies for all life insurance and annuity contracts in force. The Examination Division 
performs the required v aluation work. As of December 31,1991, general account reserves amounted 
to $60.9 billion. Separate account reserves were $ 46.4 billion. All annual and quarterly financial 
statements filed by licensed insurers are public documents. The division recorded 665 persons 
reviewing documents during the fiscal year. A total of 15,162 telephone calls were received by the 
division. 

Property and Casualty Division 

This division is responsible for reviewing all filings submitted by insurance companies relating to 
property and casualty insurance. During the year, the division handled 3,584 filings pertaining to 
changes in policy forms, manual rules and rates and filings required for monitoring competition. 

The Property and Casualty Division regulates 21 major lines of insurance sold by 444 companies 
at an annual cost in Connecticut over $4.4 billion in 1991. 

The division regulates property and casualty insurance through a three-tier system of statutory 
standards embodied in Conn. Gen. Statutes Title 38a . 

Competitive rating laws establish standards for regulation of personal risk insurance which 
includes such lines as private passenger automobile, homeowners, dwelling and other insurance 
covering personal and household needs. The statutes rely on competition in the marketplace to 
establish and maintain competitive standards. 

The division monitors market share of major insurers, reviews pricing among insurers for standards 
types of coverage and price comparisons among companies. Because price awareness is necessary to 
make an informed choice, the division publishes consumer guides with price comparisons of major 
carriers throughout the state for homeowners and automobile insurance. 

Commercial insurance is subject to file and use rating laws which also rely on competition subject 
to the standard that no rate shall be deemed excessive unless such rate is unreasonably high for the 
insurance provided or a reasonable degree of competition does not exist. 

Commercial insurance includes property and liability insurance coverages for all commercial 
vehicles and enterprises and includes insurance for manufacturers, contractors, hospitals and 
municipalities. It also includes insurance covering professional liability insurance for doctors, 
dentists, lawyers and other professionals, as well as title insurance, mortgage and bond guarantee, 
inland and other lines such as fidelity, surety, glass and burglary insurance. 

Commercial insurance covers home day care, liquor liability, environmental pollution, asbestos 
removal liability and other specialty property and liability coverages. 

The division examines submissions of the forms, rules, rates and programs from companies, rating 
and advisory organizations and requires changes where necessary to conform to applicable law and 
statutes. The division monitors price competition and levels of availability of needed insurance. 
Where appropriate, the division will recommend legislation or request authority to issue regulations. 

Workers' compensation insurance is regulated through prior approval laws which require 30 days 
advance filing of changes in rates. Workers' compensation insurance premiums in Connecticut 
totaled $726 million for the 1991 calendar year. The use of credit deviations from group filed rates 
by one or more companies within that group is permitted. Each company must calculate its own 
expenses, investment income and adjust approved loss costs accordingly. All rates in the residual 
market are subject to prior approval by the commissioner. The residual market includes the 
Connecticut Automobile Insurance Assigned Risk Plan (C AIARP) and the Fair Access to Insurance 
Requirements (FAIR) Plan. 



142 INSURANCE 



Additional functions of the division are to license and examine rating, advisory and joint 
underwriting organizations and self-insurance pools and plans; serve on committees such as the 
Municipal Liability Trust Fund, the Connecticut FAIR Plan and the Connecticut Automobile 
Insurance Assigned Risk Plan. 

The division acts as a ready source of information and resolution to consumer inquiries and 
complaints relative to the cost, content and availability of property and casualty insurance and 
provides assistance to other state agencies, municipalities and to the Legislature. 

During the year, 287 written complaints and inquiries were handled pertaining to premium 
computations, rule interpretations and coverage questions. 

Conn. Gen. Statutes Sees. 38a-349 and 38a-689 require all insurance companies licensed to write 
private passenger automobile liability or homeowners insurance to file underwriting guidelines with 
the commissioner. Companies are required to file any changes 30 days before they become effective. 
During the year, 28 companies or groups filed 35 revisions with the commissioner. 

Nine companies filed experience with the commissioner for their mass -marketing programs 
covering the 1991 calendar year, as required by Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 38a-805. The combined 
written premium for these companies was approximately $5 1 .6 million. This represented a4.7 percent 
increase over the premium written during the previous calendar year. 

The Insurance Commissioner is responsible for establishing and approving plans to make 
automobile and property insurance available to persons and organizations who are unable to obtain 
insurance in the voluntary market. 

For automobile, the plan is known as the Connecticut Automobile Insurance Assigned Risk Plan. 
During the 199 1 calendar year, the number of new applications for private passenger automobile was 
105,111 compared to 123,632 during the 1990 calendar year, a decrease of 15 percent Comparing 
calendar year 1991 to 1987, the number of applications has decreased by more than 57,000 
applications. For the first five months of 1992, there has been an 26.2 percent decrease over the same 
period in 1991. 

Commercial Automobile Insurance Procedures (CAIP) is a program in the plan which provides a 
loss-sharing mechanism among insurance companies for commercial risks. For the 1991 calendar 
year, 4,816 assignments were made to the three insurance companies which are the servicing carriers 
for the CAIP Program. This was a 34 percent increase in the number of assignments compared to the 
corresponding period in 1990. The amount of new applications' premium for these CAIP risks was 
$15.7 million for the 1991 period, compared to $10 million for the 1990 period. For the first five 
months of 1992, there has been 46.5 percent decrease in the number of assignments and a 57 percent 
decrease in the premium written for these applications, compared to the first five months of 1 99 1 . The 
variation in the number of assignments made under the CAIP Program is the result of changes in the 
companies that service commercial risks. Three of the original four servicing carriers have withdrawn, 
being replaced by two new carriers. As a result, companies have had to non-renew policies, and 
applicants have had to reapply to the new carriers. Initially this artificially increased the assignment 
counts, but now the number of new assignments has decreased sharply. 

For property insurance the plan is known as the Fair Access to Insurance Requirements (FAIR) 
Plan. For fiscal year 1991, 3,883 policies were issued involving written premiums of $3 million. 

Twenty -seven organizations and municipalities have filed applications for and received approval 
to self-insure under Section 38a-371c of the Connecticut No-Fault Vehicle Insurance Law. Fourteen 
municipalities are presently acting as self- insurers with respect to their private passenger vehicles. In 
addition, 13 organizations currently have approved programs in force in Connecticut. Before granting 
an approval for an organization other than a municipality, the organization must file an application 
to self-insure with the commissioner. Each self-insurer must provide evidence of financial security 
of the type and amounts required by the commissioner. The organization must also submit periodic 
reports on accidents, contribute to the cost of operations of the Connecticut Assigned Claims Plan and 
must reapply at the end of each annual period in order to continue as an approved self-insurer. 

Municipalities are only required to notify the department that they are self-insurers. There are no 
other filing requirements for the municipalities. 

This division also has the statutory responsibility of approving financial responsibility for outdoor 
amusements involving mechanical devices, tents, fireworks displays and indoor special effects. 
During the past year, in excess of 400 applications were reviewed and approved by the Insurance 
Department before permits to operate were granted by the State Fire Marshal. 

All annual and quarterly financial statements filed by licensed insurers are public documents. The 
division recorded 466 persons reviewing documents during the fiscal year. A total of 14, 1 1 5 telephone 
calls were received by the division. 



INSURANCE 143 



Market Conduct Division 

This division conducts on-site examinations of an insurer's books and records to review the 
company's treatment of its policyholders and claimants. This includes renewals, non-renewals and 
cancellations of policies issued to residents in this state as well as claims. This unit also verifies that 
rates being charged for various lines of insurance fall within the approved limits as established by this 
department. 

The division conducts investigations of licensees when possible violations of laws have been 
alleged or suspected. If, as a result of these investigations, further administrative action is required, 
the division takes the necessary steps. The division maintains a list of eligible surplus lines insurers, 
adds those companies which meet strict financial and management criteria and eliminates those which 
are deemed financially unsound. There are 69 insurance companies on the list. The division collects 
and audits tax returns of all excess lines brokers. Examinations are conducted as a matter of routine, 
at the request of other divisions of the department, or when the department suspects market problems 
may exist in an insurer's Connecticut operation. The division determines whether risk retention and 
risk purchasing groups doing business in Connecticut are in compliance with Connecticut and federal 
law. There are 156 risk-purchasing groups and 47 risk-retention groups in compliance. 

Consumer Affairs Division 

The Consumer Affairs Division receives and reviews complaints and inquiries from residents of 
this state concerning their insurance problems, including claim disputes, and serves as a mediator in 
such disputes in order to assist the commissioner in determining whether statutory requirements and 
contractual obligations within the commissioner's jurisdiction have been fulfilled. 

Staff within this division examine each complaint received to determine whether licensees of the 
department have acted properly and correctly pursuant to statutes, regulations and contractual 
provisions. 

Numerous complaints are justified and are resolved favorably on behalf of Connecticut's citizens 
following the examiner's review of all data pertinent to the complaint. Many additional complaints 
examined result in an examiner's conclusions that licensees complained against have acted properly. 
In these instances, examiners will respond in a manner designed to inform and educate the person 
filing the complaint. Remaining types of complaints received and examined result in factual disputes 
which require judicial review inasmuch as the licensees complained against have exhibited substantial 
defenses in support of their positions. 

The Consumer Affairs Division receives several hundred telephone calls each day. Examiners 
often submit information, advice and suggestions in response to callers' questions which assist them 
in their further independent pursuit of an insurance related matter or problem. In addition, many 
individuals each day personally appear at the division to file and discuss their complaints with 
examiners. 

Frequently, when examining complaints, the Consumer Affairs Division staff will see indications 
of alleged wrongdoing by licensees. In these instances, examiners will continue their efforts on behalf 
of the consumer and refer the information to the proper division within the department for appropriate 
action. 

The Consumer Affairs Division documents all complaints received and submits quarterly reports 
to the commissioner. These reports contain the numbers and types of complaints received and the 
number of complaints which have been resolved. The computerized complaints system initiated in 
the department enables identification of companies, individuals and organizations against whom 
complaints were filed, source of complaints, coverages, reasons for complaints, disposition of 
complaints, recovery amounts, justification determinations, status and enforcement action. These 
records and reporting capabilities enable identification of problem areas and are shared with other 
divisions. The Consumer Affairs Division published a ranking of insurance companies comparing the 
number of complaints related to the premium volume. Two lists were published, one rating 
automobile insurers and one rating accident and health insurers. 

The Consumer Affairs Division established criteria to provide an independent arbitration proce- 
dure for the settlement of disputes between claimants and insurance companies concerning automobile 
physical damage and automobile property damage liability claims in which liability and coverage are 
not in dispute. 

In addition, the department maintained records of each dispute and have compiled appropriate 
statistics to send a copy to the Insurance Committee of the General Assembly. 



144 INSURANCE 



Affirmative Action Policy 

It is the policy of this department to assure non-discrimination and affirmative action in all phases 
of the employment process including recruitment, application, interviewing, selection and testing, 
appointing, assigning, orientation, training, evaluation, promotion, and counseling without regard to 
race, color, religious creed, sex, age, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, learning disability, 
marital status, sexual orientation, present or past history or mental disorder, mental retardation, 
political beliefs or criminal record. 

To carry out this policy, the Insurance Department has undertaken positive action to overcome the 
present effects of past discrimination and to achieve, in a meaningful way, the full and fair utilization 
of women and minorities in the work force. It has developed a program of affirmative action and equal 
employment opportunity as an immediate and necessary objective which it pledges to aggressively 
pursue in every phase of its personnel policies. The Insurance Department shall continue to provide 
its services in a fair and impartial manner. 




LABOR 



Department of Labor 

RONALD F. PETRONELLA, Commissioner 

Lawrence S. Fox, Deputy Commissioner 

John E. Saunders III, Deputy Commissioner 

Bennett Pudlin, Executive Director 

Established - 1873 Statutory authority - Section 31-1 etal 

Central office - 200 Folly Brook Blvd., Wethersfield, Conn. 06109-1114 

Average number of full-time employees - 1,217 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - federal - $88,026,641; state - $10,183,244 

Capital outlay - federal - $1,859,464; state - $49,874 

Organization structure - Central office and 18 local offices 

• 

The historic mission of the Department of Labor (DOL) is to protect and promote the interests 
of the working women and men of Connecticut. DOL helps train people for jobs in a highly 
competitive global economy, helps people find jobs, protects people on the job, provides income 
support for people between jobs and collects and analyzes work-force data. 

To improve service to workers and employers, the department launched a major reorganization of 
its service delivery. DOL began to reduce layers of management and to train and empower its front- 
line staff to provide integrated service. The goal is faster, more thorough assistance to customers with 
fewer handoffs. A conference on "Surviving Unemployment," attended by more than 300 unem- 
ployed people and those who provide services to them, helped the department learn what improve- 
ments in customer service were needed. A parallel change is an overhaul and upgrading of computer 
software and hardware. This will improve the agency's overall budgeting and cost accounting and 
assist in processing unemployment checks. 

Also to improve customer service, the Labor Department adopted a policy guaranteeing equal 
access to assistance for all regardless of ability to read, write or speak English. Since 1982, a federal 
court consent decree has required the department to provide bilingual assistance to Spanish-speaking 
unemployment claimants in local offices. DOL has begun translating all important forms and 
informational material for Unemployment Insurance and Job Service into Spanish. It initiated pilots 
in two local offices that use interpreters for fact finding and appeals hearings. The initial focus was 
on the needs of Spanish-speaking customers. DOL intends, however, to expand this program to other 
significant language minorities and to all department programs. 

Annually revised employment and unemployment figures issued in March more accurately 
reflected the severity of the economic recession in Connecticut during 1990 and 1991. During the 
fiscal year, seasonally adjusted nonagricultural employment dropped by 57,400 jobs. The state's 
unemployment began the 1991-92 fiscal year at a seasonally adjusted rate of 7.2 percent, fluctuated 
several times over 12 months, reaching a high of 7.5 in January and a low of 6.8 percent in May, and 
finished at 7. 1 percent. June's rate was below the 7.8 percent national rate but up three-tenths of a point 
from the previous June. 

In November, a federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation Program began providing 
additional benefits to workers who had exhausted regular state benefits. Connecticut's Unemploy- 
mentlnsurance Trust Fund, from which regular state jobless benefits are paid, began showing a deficit 
in January 1991; as of June 30, 1992, the state had borrowed a total of $505 million from the federal 
government to pay claimants. 

Average weekly manufacturing earnings rose 4.4 percent for the year, well above the 3.1 percent 
increase in the Consumer Price Index. Manufacturing output and personal income also were up at 
year's end, and average initial weekly claims for unemployment benefits were down. 

Laid-off employees at seven companies in the state were found eligible for an array of benefits 
under the federal Trade Act after it was determined that their employment was adversely affected by 
foreign imports. 

Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment benefits paid during the year totaled $597.3 million. Benefits were available to 
qualified workers totally or partially unemployed through no fault of their own; ready, willing and able 
to accept suitable full-time work; and otherwise qualified under the law. In October, the maximum 



146 



LABOR 147 



weekly benefit rate increased by $ 1 8 to $288 . Claimants could receive an additional $ 1 per dependent 
to a maximum $50 weekly. Payments under the regular state program could continue for up to 26 
weeks during a one -year benefit period. During the year, the average duration of a claim under the 
regular state program was 17 weeks. 

Taxes paid by more than 94,000 covered employers on the first $7, 100 of each employee's wages 
totaled $235 million during the year, an amount inadequate to meet demands of claims for benefits. 
On January 23, 1991 , Connecticut exhausted its trust fundbalance and was forced to borrow from the 
federal government to pay benefits. 

From October 1991 through June 1992, the department used quarterly employer taxes to repay 
$ 1 63 .6 million on the principal of the federal loan to save employers hundreds of thousands of dollars 
in interest. The outstanding loan balance on June 30 was $505.3 million. 

In November, federal legislation created the Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) 
Program, which provided additional weeks of federally funded benefits to individuals who exhausted 
their 26 weeks of regular Connecticut benefits and had no rights to regular compensation. The number 
of weeks of EUC payable within a state depended on the state's unemployment rate and totaled 6, 13 
or 20 weeks. Connecticut's high unemployment rate qualified workers for 20 weeks. The legislation, 
effective November 17, 1991, contained a lengthy "reach back" clause to cover individuals who had 
exhausted benefits and/or had a benefit year that ended after March 1 , 1991 . As a result of this clause, 
the agency sent packets including notifications, instructions, forms and other material to about 75,000 
individuals potentially eligible for EUC or state benefits under anew Connecticut claim. To minimize 
the time clients spent on line, local offices statewide extended public hours. 

An amendment to EUC legislation in early February increased the number of weeks available under 
the program and extended its duration to July 4, 1992. Connecticut residents already filing EUC and 
new filers became entitled to an additional 13 weeks of benefits, for a total of 33 weeks of emergency 
compensation. (The most recent amendment to the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Act, 
signed July 3, 1992, extended the program and provided 26 weeks of EUC to individuals who 
exhausted state unemployment after June 13, 1992. That law specified that no new claims for EUC 
can be filed after March 6, 1993, and no payments for continued claims after June 19, 1993.) 

Occupational Safety and Health/Working Conditions 

Safety and health compliance inspections of 252 public sites were conducted by this division, 
affecting workplace conditions of 1 6,290 state and municipal employees . Violations were discovered 
during 214 inspections, with citations for 756 serious and 1,305 other-than-serious hazards. Proposed 
penalties totaled $126,506. 

Voluntary safety and health compliance by private sector employers was encouraged under a 
continuing federal contract offering on-site consultations upon request. OSHA staff provided this 
service to 494 private-sector firms with more than 16,000 workers and to 77 public agencies with 
3,800 employees. Training programs and speeches to advance occupational safety and health were 
presented to more than 3,000 employer and employee representatives. 

The 19th annual injury-illness survey was compiled using data from 8,000 employers covering 
more than 1.6 million workers and representing nearly all private sector Standard Industrial 
Classifications plus state and local governments. The 1990 survey recorded a 9.8 incidence rate of 
recordable occupational injuries and illnesses for every 200,000 employee-hours worked. On 
average, one of 1 1 Connecticut workers suffered injury or illness incidents during the year. 

Working Conditions completed 1,408 annual inspections, 1,051 for conditions of employment and 
357 for private employment agencies. These resulted in 220 written recommendations for corrective 
action. 

More than 28,000 telephone calls were logged, with major areas of interest: OSHA, 5,196; 
employment of minors, 5,447; insurance, 2,138; and private employment agencies, 1,149. 

Harold Weiner of New London was appointed to the five-member OSHA Review Board in May 
1992. 

Regulation of Wages 

Through enforcement of statutes and regulations regarding payment of wages, the Regulation of 
Wages Division recovered $4.3 million in unpaid wages, surpassing $4 million for the second 
consecutive year. 

Thirteen wage-and-hour investigators completed 1,155 audits for compliance with minimum 
wage, overtime and record-keeping requirements. Violations resulted in $1.8 million being distrib- 
uted to 3,865 workers. Prevailing-wage staff conducted 307 inspections and found 187 firms failing 



148 LABOR 



to comply with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 31-53. More than $534,000 in legally owed wages were 
recovered for 588 workers. Seven wage enforcement agents investigated and resolved 4,381 
complaints for non-payment of wages, returning $1,925 million to workers. 

All money recovered for workers was due to employers' submitting wages at the request of the 
division to comply with the law, through criminal prosecution pursuant to Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 
3 1 -71g and 3 1 -69 or civil action through the Attorney General's Office pursuant to Sec. 3 1-68 or 3 1- 
72. 

The division also embarked on an educational enforcement program in which technical services 
were made available to employers, explaining their obligations under wage-and-hour laws. A pilot 
program was launched that selected an industry and provided a guidebook and seminars. 

Automated Data Processing 

The Automated Data Processing ( ADP) Division developed, implemented, processed and supported 
data processing application systems. At the end of the fiscal year, it was in the midst of converting 
— and developing where required — all computer applications from the existing Unisys 1100/92 
system to an IBM ES/9121 model 320 mainframe. 

The Connecticut General Unemployment Insurance Development Effort (GUIDE) system was 
being developed using an 1 1 -team approach, with each team working on different components. This 
breakdown will enable the project to meet the July 1993 installation date. 

The division also defined a system to support goals and business practices of the new Labor 
Department. For instance, Job Service and unemployment insurance (UI) data processing programs 
were scheduled for production by July 1, 1993, to implement a fully integrated data base. The Systems 
Development Unit automated federal extended UI programs and shared-work programs (allowing 
collection of partial unemployment benefits while working reduced hours). UI checks and continued 
claim documents were being converted from an antiquated impact-printing application to a laser 
system. 

The agency was mandated to administer the jobs program targeted to place general assistance 
recipients into the labor market. ADP began developing reporting and financial tracking for the $7.3 
million grant for job-ready general assistance recipients. In conjunction with the agency wide 
financial and accounting reporting systems scheduled for implementation in October 1992, an 
employee leave reporting/tracking system was being developed to provide cost center managers with 
on-line accessibility. 

A Data Processing Administrative Control Unit was established for automated system computer 
operation programs running on the IBM system, such as automated tape management, program/ 
library security and access and automated computer scheduling. Installation of an uninterrupted 
power system was expected by September 1992. 

Data Entry was in the process of upgrading its key edit equipment. The hardware configuration can 
be expanded and reduced according to workloads. It will be connected to the IBM mainframe via a 
communication link, eliminating the need for creating and transporting magnetic tapes. 

Affirmative action activities within the division during the past year: two white females and five 
white males constitute new hires. Promotions went to four white females, one black female, five white 
males and one black male. Five individuals who left agency employment were: two white females, 
one Hispanic female, one black female and one white male. Female and minority employment at the 
close of the year totaled 41 percent of filled positions, a four percent decrease from the previous year. 

Research and Information 

Research and Information compiled and disbursed economic data on the work force for adminis- 
trative and economic planning by the agency and the state and for the planning needs of businesses 
and individuals. In conjunction with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, monthly estimates were 
developed of the labor force, employment, unemployment totals and unemployment rates for the 
state, 1 5 labor market areas and each municipality. Also prepared were estimates of the number of jobs 
by industry and hours of work and earnings. Occupational staffing patterns in each industry were 
profiled to project future need for workers with specific occupational skills. These were matched 
against current graduates of educational and training programs to forecast worker shortages or 
surpluses. 

Other programs identified major layoffs and plant closings to monitor industry change and worker 
retraining needs, and the agency worked with the Connecticut Census Data Center (part of the Office 
of Policy and Management) and the Department of Economic Development to expand and improve 



LABOR 149 



public dissemination of demographic, business and labor data. Statistics were developed for use in 
administering Job Service and UI programs, JTPA programs and information needed by employers 
for affirmative action planning. Various reports were available to the public, most without cost. 

Efforts focused on providing information, analysis and planning services for developing job 
training, employment and education programs . DOL played a lead role in developing the Connecticut 
Economic Information System, in cooperation with the Office of Policy and Management and 
Department of Economic Development. Automated systems will enhance administrative planning, 
economic development and employment services. 

Job Service 

Job Service registered 208,650 people for employment services and directly assisted 21,845 in 
securing jobs. Of that total, 4,586 were veterans, 948 had disabilities, 5,251 were younger than age 
22 and 11,762 were UI claimants. Registration with Job Service was required for maintaining 
eligibility for benefits. Vocational counseling was provided to 7,858 individuals; 2,139 registrants 
were administered aptitude tests; 30,927 individuals were referred to other support services such as 
training. 

Job Service administered these federal programs, designed to improve the employability of 
residents: 

• Targeted Jobs Tax Credits, to encourage hiring people from designated target groups by offering 
employers up to $2,400 in federal tax credits. 

• Trade Adjustment Assistance, to provide training, job search and relocation allowances and 
additional UI benefits to workers whose employment is adversely affected by increased foreign 
imports. 

• The Dislocated Worker Program, to extend such services as retraining, job search and eligibility 
for financial aid to workers certified under Title HI of the Job Training Partnership Act. 

• Federal bonding, to help qualified workers obtain permanent full-time jobs when inability to 
obtain bonding is the only barrier to employment. 

Between July 1, 1991, and June 30, 1992, the agency processed approximately 700 applications for 
Alien Labor Certification. Under the Immigration and Nationality Act, job service was responsible 
for recruitment of U.S. workers for positions offered to foreign nationals before applications were 
processed beyond the initial review. This program helped employers meet their labor needs and 
ensured U.S. workers an opportunity to apply for available openings. 

The Alien Agricultural Employment Program also falls under the Immigration and Nationality Act. 
The intrastate job bank and the interstate clearance system were used to recruit U.S. farm workers. 
To ensure safety and comfort, a routine inspection of camps was conducted prior and subsequent to 
the workers' arrival. Of the 1,691 job openings for agricultural workers, 600 placements of domestic 
workers resulted during the fiscal year. 

The Employment Search Program, a component of Job Connection, was administered by job 
service under an agreement with the Department of Income Maintenance. Recipients of Aid to 
Families with Dependent Children received employment services to help them achieve economic 
self-sufficiency. Of the 1,024 enrollees in Vocational Exploration workshops, 804 successfully 
completed the curriculum. Enrollments in job search workshops numbered 493, with 404 successful 
completions and 154 participants entering employment at an average starting wage of $7.51 per hour. 

Veterans Employment Representatives at all local offices had prime responsibility for ensuring that 
eligible military veterans received preferential service for jobs and training. 

Job Training and Skill Development 

More than 3, 628 persons and 215 businesses benefited from workplace-based training through $1.9 
million in state funding and technical assistance from the Office of Job Training and Skill 
Development to attract new business and industry. This helped businesses expand or assisted 
established companies with new technology to remain competitive. In collaboration Department of 
Economic Development, more than 40 projects were initiated and 22 contracts executed. As a result 
of these collaborative projects and other initiatives, more than 938 jobs were created. Approximately 
600 displaced homemakers received information, referral and employment services to help them 
achieve economic self-sufficiency, using $524,000 in state funds. 

The apprenticeship program registered 1,368 persons, and 710 apprentices completed training to 
achieve joumeyperson status, bringing the state's total apprentices to 8,223. Fifty Connecticut 
companies took advantage of the corporate tax credit in the machine tool trades to increase their 
number of apprenticeships. 



150 LABOR 



Job Training Partnership Act 

Federal funds for Title IIA of the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) totaled $14.7 million for job 
training services to more than 4,800 residents. Of these, 90 percent were economically disadvantaged 
and more than 40 percent were receiving some form of public assistance. With guidance and technical 
assistance of the state JTPA Administration, local service delivery areas placed more than 1,100 
clients in full-time unsubsidized employment. The Summer Youth Employment and Training 
Program, Title IIB, provided jobs and basic remedial education to 4,246 eligible youths age 14 to 21 
using $5.7 million in federal funds. 

Under the Economic Dislocation and Worker Adjustment Assistance Act of Title HI, $3.6 million 
in federal funds helped dislocated workers. Basic readjustment and retraining services were extended 
to some 1 ,800 workers. Of these clients more than 900 had completed the services by year's end and 
approximately 700 were placed in unsubsidized jobs. An additional 1,500 laid-off workers received 
services paid for with $3.5 million in discretionary funds. The Dislocated Worker Unit provided Early 
Intervention and Rapid Response Team services to 14,312 laid-off workers at their job sites. A total 
of $27.5 million in JTPA funds was available for services to more than 12,000 Connecticut residents. 

Appeals 

The Employment Security Appeals Division, an independent, quasi-judicial agency within the 
department, heard appeals from the granting or denial of Unemployment Insurance benefits. The 
Referee Section, the lower appeals authority, was staffed by a chief referee, 33 referees and 24 clerical 
employees. The higher authority, the three -person Board of Review, had a permanent chairman, one 
labor and one management member, seven staff attorneys and five clerical employees. The Referee 
Section received 22,405 appeals and disposed of 24,346 cases, thus reducing abacklog of appeals that 
had developed because of higher unemployment claim activity. The Board of Review disposed of 
1,878 appeals. Both branches added durational professional and support staff to address higher work 
loads. 

Efforts continued to educate the public about unemployment insurance. Appeals Division staff 
members participated in training attorneys for pro-bono projects in cooperation with Connecticut's 
legal services programs and the Small Business Development Center. Staff members also assisted in 
establishing an unemployment compensation legal clinic at the University of Connecticut School of 
Law. The division' s growing expertise with automated scheduling and case management systems was 
shared with other states when staff members traveled to a multiregional conference to conduct training 
on that subject. The division was also responsible for promulgating regulations governing the conduct 
of agents who represent parties for a fee at appeals hearings. Regarding affirmative action, one 
minority member was hired as a permanent appeals referee and Spanish interpreters were introduced 
in appeals offices in Bridgeport and Hartford. 

Board of Labor Relations 

During the fiscal year, 887 cases were filed with the Board of Labor Relations, up from the 838 in 
the previous year, also a record. Of these, 762 cases involved prohibited or unfair labor practice 
complaints and 125 petitions addressed representative issues. More than 85 percent of all cases were 
settled through mediation without the need for a formal hearing. There were 77 secret ballot elections 
to designate collective bargaining agents and 103 board hearings, resulting in 39 decisions. 

At the beginning of the year, 16 court cases were pending, 15 in Superior Court and one in the 
Appellate Court. Eight decisions reviewing board action were issued, with the courts affirming the 
board' s rulings in five cases . Three were remanded to the board and at fiscal year ' s end were on appeal 
either to the Appellate Court or Supreme Court. Five new cases were filed during the year. At year's 
end, 17 cases were pending in the Superior Court and Supreme Court. 

Board of Mediation and Arbitration 

Mediation, fact finding and arbitration to all employers and employee organizations were provided 
by the six-member Board of Mediation and Arbitration. Effective May 26, 1992, fact finding was 
eliminated by Public Act 92- 170. Assisting in the resolution of board responsibilities were 46 alternate 
members representing labor, management and the public. 

Requests for assistance continued to grow as grievance arbitration filings rose from 1,410 to 1,484, 
a record high; 352 cases were withdrawn or settled prior to formal hearings. Grievance arbitration 
awards totaled 388. Overall, the board disposed of 1,295 grievance arbitration cases, and $64,375 in 
filing fees were remitted to the General Fund. 



LABOR 151 






Continued emphasis was on mediation to resolve grievances before the more costly arbitration 
process and to help reduce the backlog of cases awaiting formal hearings. There were 386 requests 
for mediation in the public sector and 3 14 notifications of contract expirations in the private sector. 
In municipal collective bargaining impasses, fact finding was imposed in 103 contracts and binding 
arbitration in 193 other contracts. 

Plans for automating board services were a priority, with training and equipment needs identified. 

Connecticut Employment and Training Commission 

The Connecticut Employment and Training Commission took steps to improve coordination of the 
state's employment and training services. With the Governor's support, the General Assembly 
adopted legislation initiated by the commission to establish regional work force development boards 
led by the private sector. Modeled on labor market boards of western Europe, the Connecticut boards, 
in cooperation with designated state agencies, will assess by region the needs and priorities for 
investing in the development of human resources. They also will coordinate a broad range of 
employment, education, training and related services. 

The commission recommended to the Governor a comprehensive, statewide plan for human 
resource development. The plan emphasized links between state business incentives and employee 
development; increased access for all Connecticut citizens to learning and skill-upgrading opportunities 
needed to assure competitiveness; systematic, industry-recognized approaches to develop students 
for employment upon graduation from high school; and measurement of continuous improvement in 
the state's approach to work force development. The commission guided agency staff in developing 
a thorough inventory of all the state's education and training -for-employment resources. 

Affirmative Action 

The Office of Affirmative Action developed and implemented programs and activities that 
contributed to achieving cultural diversity at all levels of the agency. 

All managers have participated in cultural diversity training. In addition, agency affirmative action 
goals were assigned to each unit, providing the opportunity for participation and accountability of all 
managers. Protected group members comprised 65 percent of the work force. The agency also 
formally approved policies regarding filling vacancies, promotions, sexual harassment, discrimina- 
tion based on sexual orientation and an affirmative action complaint procedure. 

Personnel 

The Personnel Unit emphasized staffing requirements within the context of the agency's Affirma- 
tive Action Plan. These objectives complied with federal and state laws, regulations guidelines and 
executive orders. Personnel also played a role in developing new job descriptions to complete the 
agency organization. The unit conducted 57 merit promotion examinations to implement upward 
mobility and reorganization needs. In addition, 12 social services trainee positions were established 
to create an upward path for clerical and intermittent employees. A training program was designed 
to provide skills necessary to meet the minimum experience and training requirements to bridge these 
employees to an entry-level professional classification. Staff members were encouraged to broaden 
their knowledge by reassignment and cross-training. Hiring of intermittent workers because of higher 
filings for unemployment benefits was completed, and staff training addressed new procedures and 
programs . Workers ' compensation cases filed by employees were monitored. Safety in the workplace 
remained a prime concern. The department monitored implementation of collective bargaining 
contracts. 

Communications Office 

The Communications Office provided information to the public, especially through the news 
media. During the year, it issued 35 news releases of general interest, monthly reports of statewide 
and local economic conditions and biweekly summaries of unemployment claims filings. It also 
arranged numerous broadcast and print media interviews for officials and other staff members, 
dubbed videotapes for other units, drafted speeches and explained to the media rules for conducting 
client interviews in local offices. It researched and answered media queries, recently averaging 1 10 
a month. It coordinated an Employee Recognition Week to acknowledge service milestones and 
participated in planning news and other conferences. To assist local offices, it created Spanish- 
language posters and helped obtain translations. 

The office customized publications used to explain the agency's reorganization to individuals 
whose support was necessary and produced an employer's guide to UI tax audits. In addition to 



152 LABOR 



producing and obtaining temporary and permanent office signs, it designed covers, provided 
illustrations for and edited publications created by other units and created camera-ready legal notices. 
With other agencies, it participated in two nuclear emergency drills that tested methods to control 
rumors and relay information. Staff also helped provide information to the public during a brief 
shutdown of state service because of a budget impasse. Videotaping included a reorganization update 
distributed to all offices and archival footage of a dislocated worker conference, a chat among staff 
on reorganization and workers implementing the federal emergency unemployment program. The 
office issued a bimonthly employee publication, Labor at Work, and published an annual report. 

Business Management 

Business Management was responsible for budgeting, disbursement and accounting of funds for 
programs mandated and funded by the U.S. Department of Labor and the state General Fund. It 
provided fiscal and administrative support services to the agency and its employees, processed vendor 
payments and managed intergovernmental fiscal relationships. 

Local office leasing and management also were responsibilities of this office. During fiscal year 
1991-92, plans were made to relocate and redesign the Manchester, Hamden and New Britain local 
offices to provide integrated customer services. Redesign of the central office was planned; all local 
offices also will be redesigned to help implement reorganization. 

Planning was launched for a new Federal Accounting Reporting System to be implemented in 
October 1992, replacing the existing Cost Accounting System. Implementation of an Activity Based 
Costing System and a Cost Center Budgeting System is scheduled for 1993. Activity Based Costing 
will help managers analyze their processes and make them more cost effective. In the future, every 
cost center budget will be associated with a plan of service, which will be part of a unified process 
for agency goal setting and managerial evaluation. In conjunction with the new accounting system and 
DOL's reorganization, Business Management also is to be restructured. 

Staff Development 

Staff Development training ranged from one-on-one assistance to sessions for more than 100 staff 
members at a time. 

The year began with a two-day discussion among managers on the question: Does the department 
need a major overhaul? The answer was "yes," and the detailed design of the new agency began to 
take shape. Acting as facilitator, Staff Development helped identify DOL customers (current and 
anticipated, internal and external, primary and secondary) and their needs, specifying the ideal 
performance to match service to those needs. This involved defining the revamped agency, its 
hierarchy, reporting relationships, functions and linkages. Staff Development facilitated feedback via 
meetings of managers, groups representing a cross-section of the department and front-line local 
office staff. It conducted training in designing pilot projects and preparing proposals to test changes 
in the agency and methods to measure performance. Several layers of management received training 
in change, quality, team building, measurement of service success, objectives and problem solving. 

Other special sessions involved coordinating training on the emergency federal unemployment 
program, career counseling, diversity training, personality inventories, motivational patterns, man- 
agement styles that allow empowerment of staff and total quality management. Cross-training began 
between Unemployment Insurance and Job Service staff. The unit also designed and conducted a 
labor-management committee meeting with 60 union members. Plans were made for a Social Services 
Trainee Program to provide a new career ladder for clerical and durational staff lacking college 
degrees. A presentation was made to the state trainers network. 

The unit participated in designing a conference for unemployed people and representatives of 
agencies providing services to them. Information was provided to the audience, and focus groups 
enabled DOL to receive feedback ways service could improve. For a project with the Department of 
Economic Development on marketing state government, DOL designed training and assisted in a 
customer satisfaction survey of 100 businesses involving 20 state agencies. 



LABOR 153 



Board of Compensation Commissioners 

JESSE M. FRANKL, Chairman 

Established - 1913 Statutory authority - Chap. 568 

Central office - 1890 Dixwell Ave., Hamden, Conn. 06514 

Average number of full-time employees - 109 For Commission, Division of 

Workers' Rehabilitation and Division of Worker Education 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $12,975,047.71 

Capital outlay - $107,164.23 

• 

P>r the past decade, the commission, faced with a doubling of its case load, has sought to make 
the adjudicatory process, localized in the eight districts, more efficient by concentrating 
administrative, data processing, personnel, educational and appellate functions in the chairman's 
office in Hamden. Each of the eight district offices had responsibility over disputes in that territorial 
area. 

The Compensation Review Board has jurisdiction over appeals from individual commissioners. 
Public Act 91-339 enacted in 1991 has completed the centralization of the administrative process 
concentrating all administrative powers and duties in the chairman. Effective July 1 , 1992 the district 
commissioner positions were abolished. A 14th commissioner has been added and all commissioners 
are at-large. Effective January 1, 1992 the Governor appointed an advisory board representing 
employers and employees. 

Besides Chapter 568 workers' claims jurisdiction, the commission has authority over claims by 
elected and appointed officers, volunteer firemen, volunteer ambulance personnel, civil defense 
personnel, auxiliary state policemen, and also over certain special benefit programs for state 
employees, municipal policemen and firemen. Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 31 -284b gives it limited 
contract law jurisdiction over continuation of fringe benefits in employee contracts. Sec. 31 -290a 
similarly extends its tort jurisdiction over wrongful discharge cases. 

There were 59,785 lost-time injuries reported to the commission in the 1991-92 fiscal year. This 
represents an incidence rate of circa 3.9 lost-time injuries per hundred workers in the state - a rate 
differing somewhat from the 4 .7 per hundred reported by the Connecticut Department of Labor during 
the calendar year 1990, its latest reporting period. More complete reporting of injuries to the 
commission should result in a significant closing of this gap in future years. 

There were 34,439 disputes resolved by commissioners, up 12.6 percent from the prior year's total 
of 30,574. There were 1,724 fully tried and formally adjudicated matters, 5 percent of the 34,439 
dispositions total. The other 95 percent were resolved at various preliminary steps in the process 
through extensive mediation efforts and intensive pretrial conferences and procedures by the various 
commissioners. 38.8 percent of all hearings involved back injuries and 25 percent involved the upper 
extremities. 

The Compensation Review Board processed 195 new appeals. There were 178 dispositions, 96 of 
these by written opinions of the three member panels of the Compensation Review Board hearing 
appeals. One hundred forty-eight dispositions, or 83 percent, sustained the decisions below. 

Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 31-280 and Sec. 31-345 mandate that the entire annual expense of the 
commission, including the Division of Workers' Rehabilitation and Division of Workers' Education 
(DWE) is recovered by assessment against licensed insurers and 108 authorized self- insurers. Total 
indemnity and medical payments disbursed by these carriers and self-insurers during calendar year 
1991 totaled $635,896,241.28 with $130,878,886.86 or 20.6 percent of that total paid by self-insured 
employers. 

Total indemnity and medical benefits paid to injured employees in both the public and private 
sectors during 1991 were $763,440,360.08. This includes the $635,896,241.28 cited above plus 
$64,875,719.53 paid by the State of Connecticut to its own injured employees, and the Second Injury 
Fund expenditures of $62,668,399.27 during the 1991 calendar year. This $763,440,360.08 amount 
constitutes an increase of 10.7 percent over calendar year 1990. Based on data from towns with full- 
time paid fire and/or police personnel, 7-433c benefits for local police and fire heart and hypertension 
claims totaled nearly $13 million during 1991. 

During the past 15 years, workers' compensation payments have grown dramatically as has the 
workload of the commission itself. Between calendar 1976 and calendar 1991, for example, total 
compensation payments for medical and indemnity benefits increased from $74.0 million to $763.4 



154 LABOR 



million - or 931.6 percent. Of this total, private and self- insurers' payments rose from $68.7 million 
to $635 .9 million, 825.6 percent; the share paid by the state to its own employees increased from $2.6 
million to $64.9 million, 2,396.2 percent; and the amount paid from the Second Injury Fund increased 
2,139.3 percent from $2.8 million, to $62.7 million. 

During a roughly comparable period, state fiscal years 1978 through 1992, total injuries and 
illnesses reported to the commission increased by 139.3 percent from 24,980 to 59,785. 

The commissioners' workload during this period rose by an even greater proportion, informal 
hearings rising by 204.9 percent from 16,233 to 49,501 and formal hearings increased by 313.3 
percent, in 1978, 758; in 1992, 3,133. The eight trial commissioners in 1978 averaged 95 formals each 
while the 12 in 1992 averaged 261 each. These statistics, taken together, indicate a much heavier 
workload with no indication that the trend will soon be reversed or halted. 

This small agency has no personnel section and relies entirely upon the Personnel Division of the 
Department of Administrative Services for recruiting. 

The agency, (exclusive of the Divisions of Workers' Rehabilitation and Worker Education), 
consists of nine separate offices, each with a small group of employees, including the appointing 
authority. This information has been regularly communicated to the Commission on Human Rights 
and Opportunities. This agency's affirmative action plan is currently in compliance. The agency has 
no full-time affirmative action officer. This agency's affirmative action plan and program is prepared 
by the chairman's secretary based upon data provided by the agency's administrative services officer 
and personnel officer. This agency will continue its commitment to the state Affirmative Action 
Program. 

During the 12-month period ending June 30, 1992, the Division of Workers' Rehabilitation 
provided services to 5,230 injured workers applying for vocational rehabilitation benefits under the 
Workers' Compensation Act. These services included eligibility screening, aptitude testing, voca- 
tional counseling, training (both formal and on-the-job) and direct job placement. Of the 526 
individuals who completed a training program, 355 have successfully returned to the work force 
representing a 19.5 percent increase over the previous year. Another 303 are currently in active job 
search. 

For this period expenditures of the Division of Workers' Rehabilitation totaled $10,926,860. Of 
this amount, $9,508,529 was spent in direct client services including tuition, travel, subsistence, 
books, on-the-job training and fees. 

The Division of Worker Education completed its fourth video, "Workers' Compensation: Getting 
It Straight". Its most complex video effort, this new tape incorporates the major legislative changes 
enacted by the General Assembly. It will be distributed along with the division's other videos, "The 
Informal Hearing", and "ETV: Ergonomics Television". 

Of particular note was the success of the division's CompComp Program. This user friendly 
computer disk is essentially a software package on Workers' Compensation procedures. Produced 
with the aid of the Office of Information Technology, the disks are distributed without charge to the 
public upon request. By the end of the fiscal year more than 1,100 requests had been filled. 

DWE continues to publish three regularly scheduled journals: the Connecticut Business Decision 
Maker which goes to the chief executives of all Connecticut firms employing more than 19 workers; 
The Worker Education Update which goes to employee groups; and Health Works which goes to 
licensed physicians, occupational nurses, and chiropractors. The division's toll free information line 
receives approximately 60 calls per day. 







PUBLIC SAFETY 

AND 

RELATED SERVICES 



Department of Public Safety 

NICHOLAS A. CIOFFI, Commissioner 

Joseph A. Perry, Deputy Commissioner 

George E. Luther, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1979 Statutory authority - Sec. 29-lb 

Central office - 100 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 1,405 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $60,763,728 

Capital outlay - $5,703,259 

Organization structure - Office of the Commissioner, Division of State Police, and 

Division of Fire and Building Safety 




The Department of Public Safety is organized into two divisions: the Divisionof State Police and 
the Division of Fire and Building Safety. The commanding officer of each division is a deputy 
commissioner who reports directly to the commissioner. Also reporting directly to the commissioner 
is the executive assistant. Administrative functions such as affirmative action, personnel services, 
fiscal affairs, governmental affairs and labor relations, as well as the forensic lab report to the 
executive assistant. 

The Department of Public Safety affirms its commitment to the concept of equal employment 
opportunity in all operational and employment areas in compliance with the spirit and provisions of 
applicable state and federal law. During 1991-92, the department received six employee complaints 
from the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, four of which are still pending. 

Personnel Services administers human resource management programs. 

Fiscal Affairs coordinates fiscal management including budget preparation and control, federal 
grant administration, processing requests for goods and services and accounting. 

Governmental Affairs plans, coordinates and proposes the legislative program of the department. 

Labor Relations represents the department by participating in labor contract negotiations, inves- 
tigating employee grievances, conducting grievance hearings, serving as management advocates at 
arbitration hearings and state prohibited practice hearings, and reviewing internal affairs investiga- 
tions for appropriate discipline recommendations. 

The Research and Planning Section assists in conducting short and long range planning, performs 
special projects, analyzes operational activities and maintains the department Administrative and 
Operations Manual. 

The Forensic Laboratory Section provides forensic science services to all police departments, fire 
departments and other state and local agencies. Within the Forensic Laboratory, the Administration 
Section handles evidence management, photography and research and training. The Identification 
Section is responsible for the examination of firearms, toolmarks, questioned documents, fingerprints 
and imprints. The Criminalistics Section performs analyses related to serology, chemistry, biochem- 
istry, trace, instrumentation and DNA. The Reconstruction Section is responsible for crime scene 
reconstruction, criminal profiles, case analysis, computerized video and photographic enhancement 
and crime scene processing. During 1991-92, the Forensic Laboratory conducted 265,254 laboratory 
examinations and tests, and processed 214,929 films and photographs. 

The Public Affairs Office is comprised of two units: the Public Information Office, and the Drug 
Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program. 

Division of State Police 

The Division of State Police is organized within the Department of Public Safety to assist in or 
assume the responsibility of investigation, detection, and prosecution of any criminal matter or 
alleged violation of the law. The deputy commissioner and his staff coordinate and direct the activities 
of the Office of Administrative Services and the Office of Field Operations. The Professional 

156 



PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 157 

Standards Section monitors the professional integrity of the department. The section oversees the 
status of continuing compliance with National Accreditation Standards. It incorporates the Internal 
Affairs and the Inspections Units. 

Office of Administrative Services 

The Office of Administrative Services is responsible for police support functions within the 
division and consists of the Bureau of Selections and Training and the Bureau of Police Support. The 
Crimes Analysis Unit collects information and data to provide interpretive information to the 
department in a variety of operational areas. The Uniform Crime Reporting Unit (UCR) collects, 
analyzes and disseminates Uniform Crime data from all police agencies in the state. The UCR Unit 
also collects, analyzes and publishes information on family violence, sex crimes and crimes motivated 
by bigotry and bias. 

Bureau of Selections and Training 

The Bureau of Selections and Training consists of the State Police Academy & Range, the 
Recruitment & Selections Unit and the Polygraph Unit. The State Police Academy graduated two 
Protective Services training classes (totaling 45 trainees). In-Service Training Programs for 1991-92 
included: Medical Response Technician training, Suicide Awareness, Tactical Communications, 
Human Relations, Domestic Violence, Rape Crisis Intervention, Hazardous Materials, and Cap-Stun. 
Specialized training courses were also conducted for personnel of the Department of Children and 
Youth Services, State Department of Mental Health, and the U.S. Coast Guard. 

The Polygraph Unit conducted 362 examinations: 209 tests were related to criminal investigations; 
the remainder dealt with pre-employment screening . Criminal tests were conducted for state and local 
police, and the court system. 

Recruitment personnel visited colleges, job fairs and military installations. Selections personnel 
coordinated the administration of the physical agility test, psychological and medical screening, and 
background investigation portions of the selection process. 

Bureau of Police Support 

The Bureau of Police Support is responsible for the evaluation, development, installation and 
maintenance of all information management and technological systems within the Department of 
Public Safety. The Facilities Management Section maintains, repairs and renovates all department 
buildings and facilities. It also provides assistance to the commissioner and the Department of Public 
Works in coordinating capital projects. The Fleet Unit is responsible for the procurement and 
maintenance of agency vehicles. 

The Reports and Records Unit is the central repository of all department criminal and motor vehicle 
investigative files. It is responsible for collecting, storing and disseminating these records. The unit 
also designs and produces department forms, prints agency publications, and distributes the mail and 
other printed material. 

The State Police Bureau of Identification (SPBI) is the central repository of all criminal history 
records which includes fingerprints and demographic information on offenders. It processes more 
than 200,000 arrest records annually and disseminates the information to agencies authorized to 
receive it. 

The Information Management Section determines the agency's requirements for data processing 
equipment, as well as plans and coordinates the development of automated information management 
systems. The Data Processing Unit is responsible for the operation and maintenance of department 
computer equipment. 

The Connecticut On-Line Enforcement Communications Teleprocessing Unit (COLLECT) 
maintains the automated statewide "Wants and Warrants" system which interfaces with other states 
and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The unit trains and certifies users of the system, as well as 
maintaining quality control of the operation. The Headquarters Message Center provides centralized 
coordination of emergency communications, monitors department radio traffic, maintains emergency 
call-out lists and activates emergency plans. 

The License and Permits Unit investigates, licenses and regulates more than 300 private detective 
agencies and security companies as well as professional bondsmen. 

The Weapons Group annually processes more than 20,000 new or renewed pistol permits, 42,000 
handgun applications and 55,000 firearms registrations. 

The Telecommunications Section coordinates long range planning and develops the specifications 
for all radio, radar and other communications equipment. The Radio Unit provides two-way radio 
systems and siren maintenance, as well as radar calibration and repair. 



158 PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 

Office of Field Operations 

The Office of Field Operations is responsible for the delivery of police services statewide. Field 
offices are divided into three geographical districts, each with a separate headquarters facility. The 
three districts are: Eastern District (Troop C, Stafford Springs; Troop D, Danielson; Troop K, 
Colchester; Troop E, Montville); Central District (Troop H, Hartford; Troop I, Bethany; Troop F, 
Westbrook; Troop W, Bradley International Airport); Western District (Troop A, Southbury; Troop 
B, North Canaan; Troop G, Westport; Troop L, Litchfield). 

During fiscal year 1991-92, there were 548,895 calls for service recorded by department personnel. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigations 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigations, formerly the Bureau of Special Investigations, consists of 
five sections which perform specialized investigative functions. 

The Statewide Narcotics Task Force (SNTF) investigates all phases of illicit drug activity. During 
FY 1991-92 the task force conducted 2,279 investigations which resulted in 1,207 arrests, executed 
434 search warrants and initiated 10 court-ordered wire intercepts. It seized 78 vehicles and 
$1,087,720 in property and cash. 

The Statewide Organized Crime Investigative Task Force (SOCITF) which includes the Auto Theft 
Unit and the Electronic Surveillance Laboratory investigates and enforces state laws related to 
organized crime and racketeering. In FY 1991-92, 24 criminal investigations were conducted. There 
were 13 search and seizure warrants executed, resulting in seizures totaling $10,940 as well as 13 
gambling devices. The 24 investigations resulted in 19 arrests. The Auto Theft Unit conducted 1 14 
investigations, executed 38 search and seizure warrants resulting in 68 arrests and recovery of 
property valued at $788,570. The Electronic Surveillance Laboratory responded to 75 requests for 
technical assistance and installed and maintained 18 court-ordered wire intercepts. 

SOCITF was an instrumental component of the Latin Kings Task Force which was created on 
January 27, 1992. The expertise of this unit contributed to the successful beginning of the Special 
Operations Section within the Bureau of Criminal Investigations. 

The Central/Criminal Intelligence Section is a computerized information system which provides 
for the collection, retention and dissemination of intelligence data relating to the activities of persons 
or groups which are defined as "criminal" by state and federal statute. The Central Intelligence System 
is the official repository for intelligence data within the Department of Public Safety and its sole 
purpose is to store and disseminate such data. Criminal Intelligence monitors illegal activities of 
subversive groups and other criminal elements to provide strategic and tactical intelligence to law 
enforcement agencies. Such information is used to identify potentially violent situations. The Law 
Enforcement Gang Intelligence Network (LEGIN) monitors the activity of "street gangs." Twenty- 
five federal, state and local agencies now subscribe. In 1991-92 the unit provided 1,959 dissemina- 
tions of information. 

The Special Revenue Investigative Section (SRIS) contains the Gambling Unit and the Casino Unit 
which monitor all forms of legal gambling statewide. Gambling activities include jai-alai, greyhound 
racing, off-track betting, lotteries, bingo, raffles, Las Vegas nights and casino gambling. The primary 
function of SRIS is to prevent organized crime from infiltrating this multi-billion dollar system. This 
section conducted 1,250 background investigations as well as 187 criminal investigations which 
resulted in 97 arrests. The Special Operations Section began functioning on June 1, 1992 in an effort 
to create a realistic force to combat the spread of gang violence throughout the state. This unit is 
responsible for gathering intelligence on all gang related activity within the state, investigating 
incidents involving gang members, and working in conjunction with other law enforcement agencies 
(local, state, and federal) on various task forces and joint investigations. 

Auxiliary Staff Services 

This section delivers various police related services statewide. It is comprised of three units: 
Emergency Services Unit, Auxiliary State Police Unit, and Statewide Traffic Coordinator. 

The Emergency Services Unit performs various specialized services. The Bomb Squad received 
221 calls, 18 of which were false alarms. The Underwater Recovery team responded to 45 diving 
assignments. They recovered 13 bodies as well as evidence valued at over $82,000. The Canine Unit 
provided training assistance to three agencies within the state and 16 out of state agencies including 
four European countries. State Police Patrol dogs were used 2,035 times, bloodhounds seven times, 
narcotic dogs 232 times, bomb dogs 97 times and the accelerant detection dogs 103 times. The dogs 
found 42 missing persons and assisted with 205 felony arrests and 241 other arrests. The State Police 
Tactical Unit responded to five incidents and participated in eight training days. The Aviation Unit 



PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 159 

flew 177 missions for the purpose of transport, search and rescue, criminal investigations and aerial 
speed enforcement. Auxiliary State Police Officers are attached to troops or units and are under the 
direct supervision of the troop commanding officer. The Statewide Traffic Coordinator coordinates 
the traffic control and enforcement functions of the department. 

Division of Fire and Building Safety 

The Division of Fire and Building Safety consisting of the Bureau of State Fire Marshal and the 
Bureau of the State Building Inspector, is responsible for promulgating and administering a wide 
variety of codes, standards, and agency regulations intended to protect the public from the harmful 
effects of fire, explosion, mechanical failure and structural collapse. These goals are accomplished 
through a comprehensive program of investigations, inspections, enforcement, licensing, training and 
providing technical assistance to municipal fire marshals and building officials. 

The Technical Services Section of each bureau administers, promulgates and amends the fire safety 
and building codes in cooperation with the state Codes and Standards Committee. It provides 
technical assistance to municipal enforcement officials and provides the public with code interpre- 
tations, plans review and approval of new materials and systems. It grants code modifications, assists 
local officials and the general public with inspections of all types of facilities for code compliance and 
conducts safety inspections of state-owned buildings. For fiscal year 1991-92 the boiler unit 
performed 3,125 inspections and issued 12,801 operating certificates for high pressure boilers. The 
elevator unit performed 10,651 inspections and issued 6,730 licenses for elevators while reviewing 
238 design drawings for elevators. In addition, 1,453 crane operator licenses, crane registrations and 
demolition contractor registrations were issued. The state building inspector performed 1,129 
construction inspections, 99 plan reviews, reviewed 315 building code modifications and reviewed 
173 handicap and wheel chair exemptions jointly with the Office of Protection and Advocacy for 
Persons with Disabilities. The state fire marshal processed 1,498 code modification requests and 
conducted 249 plan reviews. The Fire Code Unit conducted 238 inspections. 

The training section of each bureau develops and conducts and approves training and educational 
programs for fire prevention personnel, building officials, design professionals and members of the 
construction industry. Training sections test and certify local fire marshals, building officials and their 
subordinates. Continual training is mandatory for all fire marshals, their subordinates and building 
officials. In-service training courses offered by the Bureau of State Fire Marshal had 2,942 attending. 
Training courses administered by the state building inspector had 1,000 attending and an additional 
115 building officials and inspectors were licensed for various responsibilities. 

A computerized Fire Incident Reporting System is maintained as part of the United States Fire 
Administration. In 1991-92 there were 1 15,554 incidents reported by 213 of the 276 participating fire 
departments in Connecticut. Feedback reports are used at the community level for identification of 
fire problems and planning. 

The Investigation and Enforcement Section of the Bureau of State Fire Marshal conducts 
investigations of suspicious fires and accidental fires and assists local fire marshals in identifying the 
cause and origin of fires. It assists local officials with inspections and enforcement of the hazardous 
materials codes, explosive codes and all other codes and standards relating to fire prevention and the 
safety of buildings and persons. Itperforms safety inspections of fireworks displays, amusements, and 
mechanical rides for safety compliance. There were 1,961 licenses and permits issued as follows: 
amusements 377, motion picture theaters 715, explosives 728 and fireworks 141. 

The Bureau of State Building Inspector assists in conducting investigations of buildings and 
electrical work as required. 



160 PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 

Military Department 

MAJOR GENERAL DAVID W. GAY, Adjutant General 

Brig. General Donald E. Joy, Jr., Assistant Adjutant General 

Established - 1977 Statutory authority - Title 27 

Central office - 360 Broad St., Hartford, Conn. 06105 

Average number of full-time employees - 125 

Recurring operating expenses - $8,387,541 

Capital outlay - $0 

Organization structure - Office of the Adjutant General, Business Administration, 

Military Administration, Property and Procurement, U. S. Property and Fiscal 

Office, Air National Guard, Army National Guard, and the Organized Militia 

• 

Under present Department of Defense policy, the National Guard is constituted as constituted 
as the primary backup for the active military forces. The state mission of the National Guard 
is to protect life and property and to preserve peace, order and public safety under the control of the 
Governor. The guard augments state and local civil authorities in the event of emergencies beyond 
their capabilities. The guard also provides assistance to local areas through community service 
programs. 

Facilities 

Presently under state control are 23 armories, 12 Organizational Maintenance Shops, an Army 
Aviation Support Facility, a Combined Support Maintenance Shop, an Aviation Classification Repair 
Activity Depot, a Unit Training and Equipment site, two Air National Guard sites, three field training 
sites, and one outdoor rifle range. 

Construction continues for the major upgrading of facilities at the Army National Guard Training 
Site at Camp Weicker; anew dispensary and two 200-person barracks buildings have been completed. 
Two additional barracks buildings, a Battalion Headquarters building and a maintenance shelter are 
under construction. 

U. S. Property and Fiscal Office 

This office is administered as an activity of the State of Connecticut functioning under the direction 
of the Adjutant General. The purpose of this organization is to implement the policies of the 
Department of Defense and the National Guard Bureau as they pertain to federal property and to 
budget allocations for support of the Army and the Air National Guard of Connecticut. The office of 
the United States Property and Fiscal Office is currently authorized 97 federal employees to enable 
it to accomplish its mission. 

Analysis and Internal Review Division 

The purpose of this division is to assist management in administering, safeguarding, and monitor- 
ing the utilization of federal resources, thus improving efficiency, economy and readiness. This 
assistance is rendered by conducting specific internal review of various functional areas. A total of 
30 internal reviews were completed for the Connecticut National Guard during this period. 

Comptroller Division 

The Budget and Fiscal Accounting Branches have the responsibility for the maintenance of records 
and accounting for all federal funds received in support of the Connecticut National Guard. During 
the year these branches processed over 95,000 transactions maintaining budget and accounting 
records for several major appropriations and separate programs, more than 15 projects, and over 300 
sub-project accounts. A total of more than $72 million has been allocated for the aforementioned 
projects. Additionally, a sum of over $21 million will have been paid to members of the Connecticut 
National Guard for Inactive Duty Training (weekend training assemblies). The Military Pay Branch 
provides payroll services to members of the National Guard. It maintains pay files for more than 5,000 
members. The branch processes in excess of 15,000 pay transactions, approximately 200 miscella- 
neous pay vouchers and 230 travel vouchers each month. Annual Training payrolls for the more than 
5,000 personnel are processed during the fiscal year. The Technician Pay Branch maintains time, 
attendance and salary records for over 450 full-time Army National Guard technicians. 



PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 161 

Data Processing Activity 

The Data Processing Activity provides services in support of the total mission of the Connecticut 
Army National Guard. Programs currently in place provide support in the areas of logistics, budget, 
personnel, payroll, maintenance, training, and other miscellaneous areas. 

Purchasing and Contracting Division 

The Purchasing and Contracting Division of the United States Property and Fiscal Office and the 
Base Procurement Office at Bradley International Airport awarded contracts for construction, design, 
supply and services for the Army and Air National Guard valued at over $11 million dollars. 

Logistics Division 

The Logistics Division is organized on a functional branch system. The branches are: Supply 
Management Branch, which controls the accounting of materials in stock and the management of 
funds allotted for acquisition of supplies, equipment and services; Storage and Distribution Branch, 
which consists of the warehousing and delivery of supplies in support of units within the state; 
Equipment Status Reporting Branch, which maintains the status of all major items of equipment and 
controls their distribution to ensure maximum material readiness of the units; Transportation Branch, 
which is responsible for all commercial movement of personnel and equipment, intrastate and 
interstate. Current inventory value of over $8 million in warehouse assets is used to support day-to- 
day operations and over $131 million of equipment. The Distribution Branch of the United States 
Property and Fiscal Office warehouse services all units in the Connecticut Army National Guard. 

Support Personnel Management Office 

The Connecticut National Guard work force is made up of approximately 730 federal technicians 
and 400 active Guard/Reserve (AGR) personnel. Approximately 96 percent of the technicians are 
employed in the excepted service of the federal civil service and must, as a condition of employment, 
be members of the Connecticut National Guard. The remaining technicians are members of the 
competitive federal Civil Service and are not required to maintain Guard membership. A federally 
funded budget of $40 million annually is allocated to Connecticut to support this work force. 

Plans, Operations and Training 

The Connecticut Army National Guard has continued to provide assistance to local communities 
and the nation. Over 350 requests for loan of Army equipment, civic action projects, concerts and 
parades were honored in support of local communities. Connecticut units and soldiers continued to 
train to improve readiness . More than $4. 1 million was spent on annual training and an additional $1.6 
million was spent for individual formal school training. Approximately $100,000 was expended for 
soldiers who trained overseas at locations such as Germany, Italy, Japan, Panama and Korea. A total 
of 12 mobilization exercises at all levels of command were conducted to improve the Army National 
Guard's capability to mobilize and deploy units in support of the active Army. 

Aviation Section 

The Connecticut Army National Guard Aviation Program consists of three major units: 2nd 
Battalion 126th Aviation Regiment, 169th Aviation Battalion, and Connecticut Aviation Classifica- 
tion Repair Activity Depot. The combined aviation units performed a total of 5,000 flight hours in 
support of the aircrew training program. The 1 109th A VCR AD has been named Army Aviation Unit 
of the Year. The Military Department has continued its efforts to maximize the safety environment 
for all personnel. This year increased emphasis has been placed on environmental training to ensure 
compliance with environmental regulations. 

Personnel 

The Army National Guard has a current strength of 5,13 1, or 85 percent of its authorized strength. 
The State of Connecticut Tuition Waiver Program continues to be an incentive to enlistments, along 
with those bonus programs offered by the National Guard Bureau and the provisions of the 
Montgomery GI Bill recently enacted into law. This year over 1,400 participated in those programs. 
More than 500 personnel participated in their initial Active Duty Training at various posts throughout 
the country during the past year. 

Equal Opportunity 

Minority membership in the Connecticut Army National Guard continues at 20 percent. Community 
awareness activities have been conducted through such events as ethnic observances and family 



162 PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 

activities. Increased recruiting efforts have been developed to promote an increase in the number of 
minority applications for Officer Candidate School and Noncommissioned Officer Schools. Special 
programs have been initiated to increase minority awareness and enhance growth and job opportu- 
nities within the federal system. 

Air National Guard 

The Headquarters, Connecticut Air National Guard, develops policies and insures compliance with 
Air Force policies and regulations pertaining to the Connecticut Air National Guard. The 103rd Air 
Control Squadron, headquartered in Orange, controls both Air National Guard and U.S. Air Force 
aircraft in mock battle scenarios. Participation in the past year involved over 888 weapons-controllers 
missions. The Air Control Squadron is currently at a strength 95 percent of that authorized. The 1 03rd 
Fighter Group at Bradley International Airport consists of the 118th Fighter Squadron, the 103rd 
Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, the 103rd Resources Management Squadron, the 
103rd Clinic, the 103rd Mission Support Squadron, the 103rd Civil Engineering Squadron, the 103rd 
Mission Support Flight, 103rd Security Police Flight and the 103rd Services Flight. The 103rd Fighter 
Group is attached to the Ninth Air Force, Air Combat Command. Its primary mission is to provide 
close air support of ground forces with its A- 10 aircraft. The 103rd Fighter Group is currently staffed 
at 101.2 percent of authorized strength. 

Plans, Operations and Training 

The 103rd Fighter Group has continued combat readiness training in the A- 1 ground attack fighter 
aircraft during the past year, logging 5,660 flight hours in 3,688 separate sorties. A total of 452 hours 
were flown in the C-12F during the same period. The unit has begun initial training for conversion 
to the F-16 which will officially commence in April 1993. 

Facilities 

The Air National Guard facilities at Bradley International Airport consist of 144 acres and 29 
permanent buildings valued at $15,831,000. Additional facilities totaling $13,530,000 will be 
constructed as a result of the F-16 aircraft conversion. The facilities occupied by the 103rd Air Control 
Squadron are located in Orange on 22 acres of federally owned property. Included within the complex 
are 14 buildings valued at $3,739,000. A total of 10 buildings will be replaced by five new, larger 
buildings by 1994, at an approximate federal cost of $7 million. Federal allocations to the Air Guard 
for operations and maintenance are currently $16,205,000. 



Office of Emergency Management 

JAMES F. NEALE, III, Director 

Established - 1951 Statutory authority - Title 28 and Chap. 518 

Central office - 360 Broad St., Hartford, Conn. 06105 

Average number of full-time employees - 33 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $3,063,036 

(includes federal, state and other funding) 

Organization structure - Headquarters and Emergency Operations 

Center and five area offices 




The mission of the Office of Emergency Management is to direct and coordinate the Governor's 
comprehensive emergency management program. The emergency management program 
involves mitigation to control the effect of major hazards, preparedness to protect lives and property 



PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 163 

before disasters, direction and coordination of emergency response to minimize loss of life and 
property, and recovery operations. 

Mission responsibilities of the office include early warning systems, communications systems, 
support of state agency and local planning, training and public information, resource management, 
direction of the emergency operations center, damage assessment, recovery operations and funding 
of recovery and mitigation projects. 

Funded in significant part by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Office of 
Emergency Management received federal funding in fiscal year 1992 of approximately $6,098,772 
for emergency management assistance, population protection, warning and communications, ra- 
diological defense, radiological systems maintenance, emergency management training and exercises, 
disaster preparedness and disaster assistance. 

The office also administers the state nuclear emergency preparedness program. Much of this 
funding is awarded to municipal governments for disaster preparedness planning, training and 
specialized response equipment. 

The office affirmative action plan was approved by the Commission on Human Rights and 
Opportunities and is available for inspection. 

A facility withinoffice headquarters repairs, calibrates and distributes radiation detection instruments 
to civil preparedness forces throughout Connecticut. Area offices are at Fairfield Hills Hospital, 
Newtown; State Police Complex, Meriden; Rocky Hill Veterans Home and Hospital; and Colchester 
and Litchfield State Police Barracks. 

Board of Firearms Permit Examiners 

G. ERIC DOERSCHLER, Chairman 

Arthur C. Carr, Secretary 

Established - 1967 Statutory Authority - Sec. 29-32b 

Central Office - State Armory, 360 Broad St., Hartford, Conn. 06105 

Average number of full-time employees - 1 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $44,385 

Capital outlay - $0 

• 

The Board of Firearms consists of seven members appointed by the Governor. The five 
appointed members are: G. Eric Doerschler, Esq., chairman; Arthur C. Carr, secretary; 
Richard P. Lewis, James J. McMahon, Sr., and Thomas J. Rotunda. There are two vacancies. The 
chairman is the presiding officer at hearings. The secretary is the board's official spokesman and its 
executive head for administrative and operational matters. All members continue to serve without 
compensation. 

The function of the board is to administer and enforce the provisions of Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 
29-32b. Under that section, the board has the responsibility of making inquiries and investigations, 
taking testimony and rendering decisions in connection with appeals brought to the board by persons 
aggrieved by the action or inaction of an issuing authority in matters pertaining to Sec. 29-28 or 29- 
28a in the case of pistol or revolver permits, or Sec. 53-206 or 52-206a in the case of dangerous 
weapons permits. All testimony is tape recorded at hearings and decisions of the board are subject to 
appeal to the Superior Court. 

The objective of the board is to help bring about a reasonable, uniform interpretation and 
observance of applicable general statutes of all 1 70 issuing authorities through out the state. Informal 
consultations with citizens and with police officials continue to prove effective both by expanding the 
knowledge of either of relevant statutes and by resolving 50 percent of appeals without need of a 
hearing. 

During 199 1 -92, the high number of appeals continued with 23 6 appeals received and investigated. 
Twenty meetings were held during which 118 cases were heard and decisions rendered. In addition, 
the board continues its past practice of meeting with issuing authorities, legislators and legislative 
committees to provide input on matters within the board's purview. Board members give presenta- 
tions concerning Connecticut law at various firearms safety and training courses. 

The booklet, Laws Pertaining to Firearms and to Dangerous Weapons, continues to be in high 
demand from police authorities and the general public. 

The board operates, and will continue to operate, in conformance with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 
46a-70 through 46a-78. 



164 PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 

Municipal Police Training Council 

T. WILLIAM KNAPP, Executive Director 

Established - 1965 Statutory authority - Sec. 7-294a-j 

Central office - Connecticut Police Academy, 285 Preston Ave., 

Meriden, Conn. 06450 

Average number of full-time employees - 24 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $1,370,868 

Capital outlay - $17,000 

Organization structure - Office of the Executive Director, Basic Training Division, 

Field Services Training Division, Management Services Division, 

and Certification Division 

• 

Agency responsibilities are to: provide basic police and in-service police training and set 
educational, training and licensing standards for all municipal police officers in the state; 
certify training programs offered to police recruits in accredited police academies; control the 
certification of police instructors; establish procedures for certified review training; recertify police 
officers every three years; recommend and make arrangements for in-service training of veteran 
officers; and encourage the growth of professional development and continuing education programs 
for police officers. In addition to town and city police, the council also trains police personnel from 
the four police departments of the Connecticut State University, the University of Connecticut, 
Department of Environmental Protection Law Enforcement Unit; and numerous other state agency 
law enforcement units. 

The majority of municipal police recruits are being trained at the Connecticut Police Academy. 
Recruit classes during 199 1-92 received 5 60 hours of classroom training. In addition, recruits receive 
a minimum of 80 hours of supervised field training within their respective departments. The 
Municipal Police Training Council shares the Connecticut Police Academy with the training division 
of the Connecticut State Police. At the time the facility was erected in 1965, it was designed and 
constructed to provide only basic recruit training for 40 students. Recent mandates for the Municipal 
Police Training Council to provide in-service training to 8,500 uniformed veteran officers in addition 
to basic recruit training have created a new challenge for the Council to address. The Municipal Police 
Training Council has pursued capital improvement funds for additional classroom space and 
completion of the academy without success. 

In 1982, the General Assembly passed Public Act 82-357 which expanded the powers and 
responsibilities of the Municipal Police Training Council. These included: "review" training for all 
Connecticut municipal police officers ; basic training for any individual hired as a police officer before 
being eligible for "certification;" and the major task of establishing minimum educational and training 
standards for employment as a police officer in any police position. Almost every General Assembly 
session since has added new training mandates to the certification requirements. 

During 1 99 1 -92, the council continued to provide basic training courses for newly hired probation- 
ary officers; most of these classes were held at the Connecticut Police Academy. One training class 
was located off -site. Teaching assistance was received from such agencies as the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI); Department of Consumer Protection, Drug Control Division; United States 
Treasury Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms; Connecticut State Police; United States Drug 
Enforcement Administration; Chief State's Attorney's Office; Connecticut State Police Forensic 
Laboratory; State Medical Examiner's Office; National Auto Theft Bureau; United States Depart- 
ment of Immigration Naturalization; Northeast Utilities and various municipal police departments. 
The above organizations supplied the Municipal Police Training Council with roughly 1,400 hours 
of free instruction, at a savings to the agency of approximately $28,000. 

During 1991-92, the council's Field Training Division conducted 135 training programs attended 
by approximately 6,865 police personnel. Regional in-service training programs are conducted 
regularly to assure Connecticut's cities and towns that their law enforcement personnel are kept 
abreast of new laws, legal decisions, and updated law enforcement methods. 

The Municipal Police Training Council's Law Enforcement Resource Center, located in the 
Connecticut Police Academy, has provided support to police training programs throughout the state, 
as well as to various state and federal agencies and a variety of students of criminal justice and other 
disciplines. Its law enforcement collection is being used more and more frequently by attorneys 
preparing the defense side of liability suits. During the year, over 3,000 patrons visited the Law 



PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 165 

Enforcement Resource Center for study and research and over 2,500 police personnel and 3,000 
Connecticut citizens viewed programs circulated through the Municipal Police Training Council's 
film lending library. These statistics do not include the duplicate film and video collection stored at 
the academy and used by the academy instructional team. 

During 1991-92 only 28 texts were added to the collection, and no new audio-visual programs. 
Because of budget cuts, the Law Reference Section - containing approximately 900 volumes - is no 
longer kept current with annual supplements. Work is continuing on a retrospective cataloging project 
to prepare the existing book collection for automation. 

During Fiscal Year 1991-92, the Municipal Police Training Council regulated the certification of 
over 675 police instructors throughout the state. Records are computerized and allow fast identifica- 
tion of individual areas of expertise. The council also continued its review of the compliance of police 
officers with the legislated requirements for review training ; over 1 67 departments, representing over 
11,000 officers, were scrutinized. The council evaluated the applications of over 10 out-of-state 
applicants for police officer certification and directed programs to help the officers meet Connecticut's 
standards; one regional police academy was inspected, licensed and monitored. Two regional police 
academies were inspected and licensed. One failed to operate due to budget problems and its license 
to operate expired. The activities of the licensed regional academy which did operate were 
monitored. 

The members of the Council are: Chairman Chief Edmund H. Mosca, Old Saybrook; Vice 
Chairman Chief James M. Thomas, Glastonbury; Secretary Chief Thomas E. Flaherty, Milford; Chief 
Erik Dam, New Canaan; Chief Douglas L. Dortenzio, Wallingford; Chief Richard A. Kistner, New 
London; Chief Alfred L. Shull, Simsbury; Chief Thomas J. Sweeney, Bridgeport; First Selectman 
John B . Margenot, Jr., Greenwich; Dean Charles W. Case, University of Connecticut; Joan R. Cronin, 
Norwalk; Jay B. Levin, New London; Carnie Ives Lincoln, New Preston; Frank J. Morgan, Norwalk; 
Ernest J. Nagler, Higganum and Richard N. Palmer, chief state's attorney. Nicholas A. Cioffi, 
commissioner, Department of Public Safety and Special- Agent-In-Charge Milt Ahlerich, Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, are voting ex-officio members. 



Commission on Fire Prevention and Control 

GEORGE LUTHER, State Fire Administrator 

Established - 1975 Statutory authority - Chap. 7-323 

Central office - 294 Colony St., Meriden, Conn. 06450-2098 

Average number of full-time employees - 12 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $751,685 

Capital outlay - $0 

Organization structure - State Fire Administration, Public Information, Fiscal 

Services, Certification, and Training 

• 

The Commission on Fire Prevention and Control is appointed by the governor. The commission 
ers represent the statewide fire service organizations. The following served as commissioners 
during the year: Chairman Maurice F. McCarthy, Waterbury; Vice Chairmen Peter Carozza, 
Waterbury; Secretary Edward F. Haber, Berlin; Jon W. Andresen, Windsor; Edward Gomeau, Old 
Saybrook; William Johnson, West Haven; Kevin J. Kowalski, Simsbury; Daniel Milewski, Stratford; 
Peter Mullen, Branford; George J. Munkenbeck, Jr., Waterbury; Richard H. Nicol, Middlebury; 
George Luther, Meriden; and John Vendetta, Hartford. 

The commission appoints the state fire administrator who oversees the functions of the agency. 
George Luther served in this capacity from 1981 until March of 1992 when he accepted anew position. 
Wayne Sandford was then appointed acting administrator, overseeing four divisions: Public Informa- 
tion, Fiscal Services, Certification, and Training. 



166 PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 

In the past two years the commission has reduced full time staff by two positions from 14 to 12. 

Affirmative Action Statement 

The commission is in full compliance with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 46a-70 to 78. It subscribes to 
the policy of providing equal employment and services opportunity on the basis of merit and 
qualifications, without regard for race, color, religious creed, sex, age, sexual preference, national 
origin, ancestry, mental retardation or physical disability, including but not limited to, blindness, 
unless it is shown that such disability prevents performance of the work involved or jeopardizes the 
safety of the public. 

Capital Building Project - Connecticut Fire Academy 

The construction of the five-building complex at Bradley International Airport made significant 
advances during the year. Located on nearly 16 acres on the northern side of the airport, the complex 
will house the commission's offices and training center. The project is estimated to cost $1 6 million. 
When completed (October 1993) it will have the capacity to train 10,000 persons per year. State of 
the art simulators will be available for both live fire training and training in the handling of hazardous 
chemical emergencies. 

Administrative Projects 

The commission continues to actively promote the recruitment and retention of volunteer 
firefighters in an effort to curtail the shortage of volunteers throughout the state. The commission's 
staff remains active in national committees and boards which impact the duties, responsibilities and 
training of firefighters. 

Public Information Division 

The Public Information Division, headed by Director Cynthia Colton-Reichler, is responsible for 
coordinating and supporting juvenile firesetter intervention programs, establishing and presenting 
public fire education programs and resources and information services. 

Four additional communities implemented Firehawk programs, bringing the total to thirteen. These 
programs identify, evaluate and treat children involved in firesetting behavior. One hundred people 
attended a statewide conference which addressed the on-going needs of local programs. Forty 
firefighters were trained on how to be Firehawk companions, providing guidance and positive role- 
models for children involved in firesetting behavior. The training has taken place though the 
combined efforts of the commission and social services agencies in local communities. 

An informational campaign was launched in the first phase of a project, which will revolutionize 
communications between the 340 fire departments in the state and the commission. The commission 
will be producing and broadcasting television programs which will be received at each fire station. 
Training films, announcements and safety information will be broadcast weekly. 

The division trained 26 fire service personnel to the Public Fire Educator I level, improving their 
ability to teach fire safety to the public. Several programs are made accessible to local fire departments 
and the general public to assist them in delivering public fire education. Available for loan are two 
robotic fire hydrants, two exhibition display boards and a talking computer. 

Fiscal Services Division 

The Fiscal Services Division, headed by Director Fred Morton, is responsible for the personnel, 
financial, purchasing and physical plant functions of the commission. 

Each year the commission publishes over 2.5 million pages of student/instructor printed materials. 
The division oversees the loaning of audio visual materials from the commission's extensive 
collection of films, video tapes, slides and audio tapes. This past year saw a significant increase in 
library usage. 

The division administers the payments to volunteer fire companies for responses to limited access 
highways. 

It has recently automated the accounts receivable process for the sale of training programs, printed 
materials for training, certification emblems and student certification examinations. This process has 
increased the rate of collection for overdue accounts by approximately 70 percent. 

Certification Division 

The Certification Division accredited by the National Board on Fire Service Professional Quali- 
fications is responsible for the development and administration of the testing and certification of fire 



PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 167 

service personnel. This program is voluntary in nature, however many fire departments make it 
mandatory through probationary, bylaw and contract provisions. Therefore, the integrity of the 
system is crucial to avoid legal challenges. 

This division experienced a seven percent decrease in fire service personnel tested during FY 1991- 
92. A total of 3,202 fire service personnel were tested within the 14 levels of professional qualification 
competency testing as offered by this division. Overall, 76 percent or 2,428 individuals successfully 
passed examinations. 

A fee for certification testing went into effect January 1, 1992. This fee will enable the division 
to audit and evaluate local training programs leading to certification. 

The division continues with its contract with Performance Training Systems, Inc. a private 
corporation which markets this division's certification questions to state fire training organizations 
and fire departments throughout the U.S.. 

The sixth annual certified instructors seminar was held at the New Haven Regional Fire School with 
over 100 instructors in attendance. This seminar is designed to serve as a refresher educational 
methodology program. 

Training Division 

The Training Division is headed by Director Wayne Sandford. It is responsible for the development 
and presentation of fire training programs for the firefighters of Connecticut. The division lost one 
trainer position from the previous year. 

In Fiscal Year 92 the Training Division delivered 386 classes to 13,231 students who received 
136,921 hours of instruction. Fire officer training continues to be in high demand. The Connecticut 
Weekend at the National Fire Academy, which is dedicated to fire officer training, was offered for 
the ninth consecutive year. One of five courses was completed by 326 officers from across 
Connecticut. 

A New England regional officers weekend, co-sponsored by the agency with the six other New 
England states, was held at the University of Massachusetts. A total of 70 fire officers from 
Connecticut attended. 

The state Fire School's "Operations Manual" was revised to bring the school in line with the latest 
safety standards for fire training. 

The commission is the coordinator for the training administered by the State Emergency Response 
Commission. Federal and state monies were received from the state Emergency Response Commission 
for twelve hazardous materials training programs. The Hazardous Materials Week program moved 
into it's second year with a attendance of 1,007 individuals who completed at least one of the 29 
programs offered. The 1992 June School was the tenth offered by the commission. 1,197 students 
attended at least one of the 37 programs offered. 

Requests for industrial training doubled over the previous year, 59 courses were delivered to 740 
students. 

A new public education program called the ESCAPE trailer was added. It is designed to train third 
graders to plan and practice an exit escape plan for their home in the advent of a fire. The trailer 
delivered programs to 1 1 school systems training 2,850 students. 



168 PUBLIC SAFETY AND RELATED SERVICES 




CONSUMER PROTECTION 

AND 

RELATED SERVICES 



Department of Consumer Protection 

GLORIA W. SCHAFFER, Commissioner 

Trudi Bird, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1959 Statutory authority - P.A. 412, Sec. 21a-l 

Central office - State Office Building, Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 161 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $7,075,271 

Revenues - $17,850,530 

Capital outlay - $38,220 

Organization Structure - Bureau of Licensing and Regulation: Athletic, Drug 

Control, and Real Estate Divisions; Occupational Licensing Division; Professional 

Licensing Division; Bureau of Consumer Affairs: Consumer Information Center, 

Foods, Frauds, and Weights and Measures Divisions, Product Safety Division: 

Automobile Dispute Settlement Program (Lemon Law); Commissioner's Office; 

Legal Division; and Business Office 

• 

The Department of Consumer Protection is a regulatory and enforcement agency, enforcing 
legislation intended to protect consumers ' health and safety, as well as from injury by product 
use or merchandising deceit. The department conducts regular inspections of wholesale and retail 
food establishments, drug-related establishments, construction sites, childrens' toy sales and com- 
mercial establishments that use weighing and measuring devices . These activities are enhanced by the 
department's jurisdictional ties to the Federal Trade Commission through the Connecticut Unfair 
Trade Practices Act, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration through the Pure Food, Drug and 
Cosmetic Act, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission through the Connecticut Child 
Protection Act, and the National Bureau of Standards through weights and Measures Act. The 
department responds to consumer complaints; investigates alleged fraud, issues and reviews licenses 
for various trades and professions. 

Code of Fair Practices 

The department is firmly committed to affirmative action and providing equal employment 
opportunities on the basis of individual merit without regard to protected class membership. A full- 
time affirmative action officer coordinates and monitors the department's endeavors in the imple- 
mentation of the state Code of Fair Employment Practices, Affirmative Action and Contract 
Compliance, in accordance with state law. 

During the past year, minorities and females composed 56 percent of the hires and 77 percent of 
the promotions within the department. The Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities has 
approved the department's affirmative action plan. 

The Real Estate Commission, which is responsible for the enforcement of state real estate laws, has 
informed real estate licensees about nondiscrimination, fair housing practices and revisions in these 
laws. The commission requires all educational institutions teaching the approved principles and 
practices courses to offer at least one three-hour session devoted entirely to state and federal fair 
housing laws. 

Athletic Division 

The Athletic Division has sole control and jurisdiction over all boxing bouts and wrestling 
exhibitions held within the state except those classified as amateur. All contestants, managers, 
referees, announcers, seconds, promoters and timekeepers in boxing and wrestling are required to be 
licensed. 

During 1991-92, two boxing shows were held and 11 wrestling exhibitions were staged. The 
division issued 78 licenses to announcers, boxers, wrestlers, seconds, timekeepers, matchmakers, 
promoters, managers, referees and judges. Revenues generated from these licenses totaled $2,710. 
The five percent state athletic tax amounted to $28,006. Total gross receipts for boxing and wrestling 
were $558,854. Total money collected by the Athletic Division was $30,716. 



170 



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 171 

Drug Control Division 

This division is responsible for the enforcement of those state laws that pertain to the adulteration 
and/or misbranding of all drugs, cosmetics, and devices; embargoing of substandard drugs, cosmetics, 
or devices and the destruction or removal from commerce of those products which may be adulterated 
or misbranded due to fire or water damage, labeling, unsanitary conditions, improper storage, and 
other factors; the receipt and destruction of criminal drug evidence or other excess and undesired 
controlled drugs; issuance of practitioner registrations for controlled drugs, as well as licensure of 
manufacturers, wholesalers and laboratories that are involved in the legal use or distribution of drugs, 
cosmetics and/or medical devices. It is also involved in the monitoring of legal drug distribution 
systems at all levels of commerce and in the professional practice of all physicians, dentists, 
veterinarians, podiatrists, pharmacists, paramedical personnel hospitals, and other health care 
practitioners and care giving institutions. 

The division is involved in the instruction of municipal and state police officers at the Connecticut 
Police Academy, the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration Training Schools and local police in- 
service training academies; the instruction of students in the paramedical field such as state L.P.N. 
programs, schools of nursing and school of pharmacy; the presenting of in-service training programs 
to societies representing pharmacists, practitioners and others in health related fields; the investiga- 
tion of criminal cases involving sale or possession of drugs or cases in which controlled drugs are 
obtained from legal registrants by thefts, diversion, fraud and deceit or other means; the institution 
of either administrative or criminal actions against medical professionals who may be drug law 
violators; the investigation of all consumer complaints concerning drugs, cosmetics and devices; and 
the maintenance of coordinated and cooperative efforts with all federal, state and local agencies which 
are concerned with these products. 

During 1991-92, the division conducted 563 routine inspections and audits requiring a total of 
4,743 inspection hours; conducted 160 investigations involving dentists, nurses, pharmacists, 
physicians and other health care practitioners; obtained 1 1 arrest-warrants; entered into agreements 
with 13 practitioners for the surrender or suspension of their controlled substance registrations 
following investigations of alleged violations by them; referred 59 reports of completed investiga- 
tions to various health related licensing boards for administrative action; testified on 43 occasions at 
court trials and administrative hearings; made 60 educational presentations to a total of 1 , 65 1 persons ; 
rendered 201 on site advisement; conducted 1,162 destructions of controlled drugs in areas such as 
extended care facilities, pharmacies, physician's offices, etc.; spent in excess of 400 hours in response 
to emergency situations such as floods, fires and product tampering incidents. The division issued 
6,239 practitioner-controlled drug registrations, 252 laboratory licenses, 56 manufacturer's licenses 
and 238 wholesale licenses. Revenues totaled $253,043. 

Education Unit 

This unit is charged with keeping Connecticut consumers advised of their rights under the law and 
alerting them to any known product hazards, deceptions or marketplace frauds. This is done through 
press releases, public service announcements, television and radio interviews. This year, 83 press 
releases were distributed. Radio stations aired 20 public service announcements taped by the 
commissioner. The unit distributed thousands of pamphlets and fact sheets. Sixteen speaking 
engagements were filled by the commissioner and the education unit, reaching an audience of 1,23 1 . 
Other agency staff fulfilled 149 speaking engagement requests, addressing some 7,000 people. 

Food Division 

The Food Division is charged with the enforcement of Connecticut laws and regulations requiring 
the food products sold in Connecticut to be safe, wholesome, honestly and informatively labeled, 
advertised and packaged. Inspections of food establishments are made periodically during the year. 
These include food processing plants, warehouses, and retail food stores, bakeries, non-alcoholic 
beverage plants, frozen dessert plants and vending commissaries. These inspections are made to 
determine compliance with state statutes and regulations including the uniform food, drug and 
cosmetic act, the act regulating the sale of packaged commodities, the unitprice act and various other 
state and federal regulations. 

The Food Division also conducts inspections of cider and apple juice plants, apples, potatoes, 
pesticides and Kosher foods, as well as coin operated food vending machines and roadside stands. The 
division conducts inspections for 'Truth In Menu" advertising at restaurants and retail food stores. 

During fiscal year 1991-92, licenses were issued to 4,797 bakeries, 417 non-alcoholic beverage 
plants, 81 wholesale frozen dessert manufacturing plants, 1,386 retail frozen dessert manufacturers, 



172 CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

526 vending machine companies and 140 apple juice/cider plants. The activities of the Food Division 
included in part 3,494 inspections of retail food stores, 5,538 bakery inspections, 9 inspections of 
Kosher food establishments, 127 pesticide inspections, 1,909 frozen dessert inspections, 17,718 
vending inspections, 173 food warehouse inspections, 64 apple juice/cider mill inspections and 143 
non-alcoholic beverage manufacturers. Total inspections were 29,946. 

The Food Division also reacts to emergency situations such as food and drug product recalls and 
food tampering incidents, natural disasters such as floods and hurricanes, truck accidents and fires 
involving food. In fiscal year 1991-92, the Food Division handled 21 truck accidents and 1 1 fires; 57 
hours were spent involved in Civil Preparedness drills; 30 hours were spent on emergency inspections. 

Five hundred twenty-three consumer complaints were investigated requiring consumer interviews, 
food establishment investigations and laboratory analysis of samples. Total samples collected were 
2,013. 

The Food Division conducted 85 inspections and five reinspections under contract to the Food and 
Drug Administration. This generated a revenue of $34,245. Revenue from licensing, F.D.A. contracts 
and Chapter 418 fees amounted to $271,145. Two hundred nineteen regulatory letters were issued. 
The value of food voluntarily destroyed under Food Division supervision was $43,301. Legal actions 
included 27 Chapter 418 reinspections, one compliance hearing and three injunctions. Twelve food 
recalls required food establishment inspections which expended 137 hours. 

Fraud Division 

The Fraud Division is charged with enforcing legislation intended to protect the consumer from 
injury by unfair or deceptive acts and practices. The division also licenses, inspects, and investigates 
health clubs, closing out sales, itinerant vendors, and jewelry auctioneers. As a public service, the 
Fraud Division's complaint center provides mediation services to consumers who have ongoing 
disputes with Connecticut businesses. The department's health club guaranty fund and home 
improvement guaranty fund are also managed by this division. 

During fiscal year 1991-92, the division focused its investigative resources in the areas of home 
improvement, automobile advertising, comparison advertising, and closing out sales. The division 
conducted 476 home improvement investigations, 175 trade practice investigations, 97 comparison 
advertising investigations and 22 closing out sale investigations. As a result, 277 files were referred 
to the department's Legal Division for formal administrative action and 76 files were referred to the 
Attorney General's Office for criminal prosecution. The Fraud Division issued 171 health club 
licenses, 64 itinerant vendors licenses, 47 closing out sales licenses and eight jewelry auctioneer 
licenses. 

The complaint center receives, processes, mediates and investigates consumer complaints. It also 
forwards complaints to appropriate federal, state or local agencies and responds to formal state 
Freedom of Information requests. During 1991-92, this unitanswered over 134,609 consumer phone 
inquiries and 8,510 written complaints were processed. 

A total of $185,635 was paid out of the health club guaranty fund as a result of 16 health club 
closings. A total of $916,814 was paid out from the home improvement guaranty fund to consumers 
who were victims of unfair or deceptive acts by home improvement contractors. 

Legal Division 

The Legal Division serves as an in-house legal office for members of the department. The Legal 
Division personnel draft legislation, regulations, declaratory rulings, letters for department staff and 
all legal documents utilized in conducting various administrative actions. In-house attorneys 
prosecuted at a large number of administrative hearings required to enforce Department of Consumer 
Protection and board and commission laws. Actions taken by the Legal Division during the fiscal year 
1991-92 included 415 formal hearings, 69 investigatory hearings; 172 investigative demands, 28 
notices of alleged violation of state laws; 1 73 state Freedom of Information requests; 113 compliance 
meetings; regulations withdrawn; 12 regulations enacted; and 64 declaratory rulings. 

Occupational Licensing Division 

The Occupational Licensing Division administers the regulatory responsibilities of eight boards 
and is the registration agent for mechanical contractors. It is the function of each board to establish 
and maintain standards that will provide for reasonable knowledge of each candidate prior to the 
issuance of a license. This is accomplished by establishing a period of apprenticeship in the varied 
occupations which terminates after successfully completing an examination administered under the 
supervision of each board. Mechanical contractors registrations are administered solely under the 
auspices of the commissioner of the Department of Consumer Protection. 



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 173 

There are five separate boards for the following occupations: electrical work; plumbing and piping 
work; heating, piping and cooling work; elevator installation, repair and maintenance work; and fire 
protection sprinkler systems work. 

The Elevator Installation, Repair and Maintenance Board and the Electrical Work Examining 
Board consist of eight members appointed by the Governor: One general contractor; two unlimited 
contractors, two unlimited journeymen and three public members. 

The Plumbing and Piping Work Examining Board, the Heating, Piping and Cooling Work 
Examining Board, and Fire Protection Sprinkler Systems Work Board consist of nine members: three 
unlimited contractors, two unlimited journeymen; one general contractor and three public members. 

The Department of Consumer Protection conducts written examinations. A certificate entitling a 
person to engage in the work or occupation for which a license is sought is issued when such person 
has qualified for a license and has remitted the license fee. All licenses issued by any board expires 
on October 1 in the odd-numbered years. Violations of laws regarding the licensing required by these 
boards have penalties which are prescribed in Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 20-341. 

Collectively, there are approximately 30,988 craftsmen licensed in the following occupations: 
electrical, 14,923; plumbing and piping, 7,905; heating, piping and cooling, 8,944; elevator crafts- 
men, 383 and fire protection Sprinkler Systems Work Board, 2,630. Revenue from these licenses total 
$4,642,025. 

The Board of Television and Radio Service Examiners consists of five members; three public and 
two television technicians. The function of the board is to enforce the provisions of the act which 
includes a requirement for written, practical and oral examinations three or more times a year to 
qualified certified electronic technicians, radio service technicians, and antenna technicians. The 
board also registers apprentices and service dealers. The board received 91 examination applications 
and 1,534 licenses were renewed. Revenue from this activity totaled $128,920. 

The Tree Protection Examining Board consists of seven members, one plant pathologist, one 
forester, two licensed arborists and three public members. The board examines the qualifications of 
applicants who wish to do arboriculture for hire in this state. The board may suspend or revoke licenses 
for sufficient cause. The past year, four examinations were held; 114 applications for examination 
were received; 80 licenses were renewed, making a total of 751. Revenue from this activity totaled: 
$4,815. 

The Well Drilling Board consists of eight members appointed by the Governor: two active well 
drillers, one employee of the Connecticut Health Department, one geologist or professional engineer, 
one member of the Department of Environmental Protection and three public members. The function 
of the board is to administer and enforce the provisions of the Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 25-1 26 through 
25-173a , to establish the requirements for registration for well drilling contractors, and to issue 
permits for new wells and maintain records for existing wells. 

The past year this board issued 4,694 well drilling permits and renewed 121 registrations. Revenue 
from this activity totaled: $40,078. 

Registrations of mechanical contractors takes form of as any corporation, company or other 
business organization offering services in plumbing, heating and cooling work in industrial and 
commercial structures and those buildings that contain more than four dwelling units. Such company 
must employ more than ten licensed individuals. A violation of this statute is deemed an unfair or 
deceptive trade practice. 

There are 52 mechanical contractors registered with revenue from registration of $2,655.00. 

Revenue from various fees collected by the Occupational Licensing Division totaled $4,818,493. 

Product Safety 

The Product Safety Division protects the health and safety of Connecticut citizens in their use of 
consumer products, protects the economic well-being by providing an independent arbitration 
mechanism for settling automotive disputes, and ensure that filling materials used in bedding and 
upholstered furniture are truthfully labeled and properly cleaned. 

Injury and death statistics, product testing, and consumer complaints identify priority issues. 
Recalls are initiated and monitored when products do not comply with mandatory safety standards. 

Educational programs are developed and implemented when investigation indicates widespread 
patterns of misuse. Manufacturers of hazardous substances are inspected to determine if cautionary 
labeling is accurate and complete. Fifteen products were found to violate mandatory safety standards 
leading a recall of over 33,000 units. 

In 1991, 289 automobile complaints were received of which 259 were eligible for lemon law 
arbitration. Over $3 million was recovered for consumers in 1991 bringing to over $21 million the 
total costs recovered for consumer by the program. 



174 CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

Licenses are issued to manufacturers, supply dealers, renovators, and second hand dealers of 
bedding and upholstered furniture. Retail inspections are conducted to ascertain that out-of-state 
manufacturers comply with license requirements. The division spent 250 inspector-hours conducting 
inspections of retailers which generated $1 1,300 in fines. 

License revenue for the fiscal year totaled $64,725. 

Professional Licensing 

The Architectural Licensing Board is responsible for the licensure and regulation of architects, 
partnerships of architects and professional engineers and land surveyors, and the practice of 
architecture by corporations. The board is also responsible for qualifying applicants for licensure, 
which for the first one may include an eight-part examination. 

There is a total of 3,764 licenses under the jurisdiction of the board. In 199 1 - 1 992 the licenses issued 
were as follows: 3,104 renewals, 85 new licenses; 3 certificates of authorization of joint practice by 
architects and engineers and 14 certificates for the practice of architecture by corporations. During 
the year the department administered 260 examinations. There was a total of 33 investigations. The 
board took action on 27 complaints which included three consent agreements, three orders of 
immediate discontinuance and one license placed on probation. 

Revenue generated by the board for the year was $479,886.00 

The Board of Landscape Architects is responsible for the qualifying of all applicants for licensure 
which may include the taking of a five-part examination. There is a total of 336 licenses under the 
jurisdiction of the board, which in 1991-1992 issued 314 renewals and 22 new licenses. The 
department investigated four complaints. The revenue generated by the board for the year was 
$33,205. 

The Board of Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors is responsible for the licensure and 
regulation of professional engineers, land surveyors, engineer-in-training, land surveyor-in-training. 
The board is responsible for issuing certificates of registration for corporate practice of engineering, 
corporate practice of land surveying, joint corporate practice of a combination of architects, engineers 
and land surveyors. 

The board is also responsible for qualifying all applicants for licensure and holds semiannual 
examinations for applicants for professional engineer, engineer-in-training, land surveyor and land 
surveyor- in-training. There is a total of 10,667 licenses under the jurisdiction of the board. In 1991- 
1992 the licenses and certificates of registration issued were as follows: Renewals: 6,107 professional 
engineer, 475 land surveyors and 263 professional engineers and land surveyors and327 corporations. 

There were 25 complaints concerning professional engineering and 19 complaints concerning land 
surveying. The board dismissed 23 of those complaints, issued one order of immediate discontinu- 
ance, and one letter of reprimand. The board dismissed 15 of those complaints, issued two year 
probation with restitution and three license suspensions. The revenue generated by the board for the 
year was $1,856,109. 

The department issued 44 interior designer registrations during the past year for a total of 721 
registrants. There were 20 complaints received concerning persons using the title "Interior Designer" 
without registration. $76,697.50 in revenue was generated from fees. 

The department received 586 applications for general contractor and major subcontractor licenses. 
Two hundred eighty-seven general contractor and 269 major subcontractor licenses were issued and 
30 applications are pending. Total revenues generated for the fiscal year were $360,500. 

In 1991-1992 the department inspected 234 mobile manufactured home parks and issued 237 
licenses. Twenty written complaints were received and eight compliance conferences were held. The 
license fees for the fiscal year generated $106,021 in revenue. 

The Commission of Pharmacy is responsible for the licensing and regulating of retail pharmacies, 
pharmacists, assistant pharmacists, pharmacist interns and the holders of patent medicine permits. 
The commission is also responsible for the qualifying of all applicants for licensure, which for initial 
licensure may include the taking of a four-part examination. The Pharmacy Commission issued 99 
pharmacist-intern registrations, 233 new pharmacist licenses, 3,877 pharmacist renewals, 1,742 
patent medicine renewals, 36 new pharmacy licenses, 680 pharmacy renewals, 29 changes of 
pharmacy ownership, 1 10 changes of manager, 14 changes in pharmacy names, and 10 changes of 
location. During the year, theoretical written examinations were given to 1 1 1 pharmacist candidates. 

The Pharmacy Commission held 25 compliance meetings , four hearing meetings and 13 
conference meetings from July 1991 to June 1992. One pharmacist license was revoked, 14 settlement 
agreements were made and 4 pharmacist licenses were suspended. Revenue for the year received by 
the Commission of Pharmacy totaled $379,677.30. 

The Public Charities Unit's objective is to protect the contributing public from fraud and 



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 175 

misrepresentation in regard to the solicitation of funds for charitable purposes and to prosecute 
persons and entities which engage in such fraud or misrepresentation, to collect information on the 
financial activity of charities in Connecticut and to disseminate the information to the public. 

The Public Charities Unit is a joint program of the Department of Consumer Protection and the 
Attorney General's Office, combining the administrative, investigatory and prosecutorial resources 
of the two agencies into one unit. In 1991-1992, 4,1 18 charitable organizations were registered with 
the Public Charities Unit and 41 professional fund raisers were registered. It received 1,802 
complaints and requests for information on charities; 77 investigatory compliance hearings were 
conducted. The unit collected 580,460 in filing fees during the year. Significant Program Accomplish- 
ments: (1) As part of an on-going public education initiative, the Public Charities Unit released its fifth 
annual report on paid telephone soliciting by Connecticut charitable, civic, police and fire fighter 
organizations. It showed that of S8.9 million donated to professional telephone solicitors, only $2.6 
million (29 percent) reached the charities for which it was intended. (2) The number of soliciting 
organizations monitored by the Public Charities Unit continues to increase. There are now 4,118 
charities on file, an increase of 50 percent in three years. 

Real Estate Commission 

The Real Estate Commission is charged with the overall responsibility of the enforcement of the 
real estate laws and general supervisory authority of the real estate and appraisal businesses conducted 
in Connecticut. The commission requests that the staff of the Department of Consumer Protection 
conduct field inspections of real estate and appraisal licensees ' offices and records, examines all types 
of real estate contracts, appraisal reports, forms and documents used in the general practice of real 
estate and appraisal and investigates complaints filed against licensees. The Educational Section 
qualifies and monitors schools, courses, and advertising in accordance with Real Estate Commission 
guidelines for candidates who must meet both the pre-licensing and post-licensing requirements. 
There are a total of 70 approved schools offering 279 pre-licensing courses. There are 137 approved 
schools offering 828 approved continuing education courses. All licensees must demonstrate every 
two years that they have 12 classroom hours of continuing education or have passed an examination 
demonstrating their current knowledge of the laws and practices of real estate. 

The Licensing Section is charged with the responsibility of qualifying all real estate brokers and 
salesmen. During 1991-1 992 this section processed approximately 3 ,5 69 applications for licenses and 
2,553 real estate brokers' and salesmen's examinations were administered. In addition, approxi- 
mately 1,425 residential appraisal licenses were issued and 739 appraisal licenses, 1,017 Certified 
General Appraiser and Certified Residential Appraiser Licenses were issued. The revenue collected 
was $796,711. The Licensing Section also processed 2,958 real estate salesmen's transfers. The 
section issued a total of 9,585 brokers' licenses and 15,069 salesmen's licenses for a total of 24,654. 

The total revenue received from applications, transfers and issuance of real estate broker and 
salesman licenses was $6,542,730. In addition, a total of $29,000 was deposited in the Real Estate 
Guaranty Fund which protects the general public for claims arising out of the Guaranty Fund this fiscal 
year in the amount of $41,024. 

A total of 434 license certifications were issued resulting in $6,515. Also, $1,965 was collected 
from the sale of lists of Connecticut licensees. This section collected $810 for issuing duplicate 
licenses to replace a lost license or process a name change, address change or change of designee. 
Approximately 25,000 telephone inquiries were received from the general public. 

The Investigation Section handled approximately 14,000 telephone inquiries and 179 verified 
written complaints. In addition, the Real Estate Commission conducted 11 formal hearings and 16 
compliance conferences. Seven fmes were imposed by the Real Estate Commission totalling $5,000. 
Settlement of complaints resulting in a total of $10,600 being returned to the public. There were five 
Guaranty Fund hearings conducted resulting in payment out of the Guaranty Fund totaling $41,024. 

The Interstate Land Sales Section processes all filings of out-of-state developers. These companies 
are required to be licensed in order to promote or offer land within this state which is physically located 
outside of the State of Connecticut. It processed 129 filings for improved and unimproved properties 
-25 registrations pending licensing. The fees received from these filings total $30,150. 

The Real Properties Securities Dealers Section certifies real estate brokers through examination for 
qualification to make public offerings of shares of trust deeds or promissory notes secured by real 
property. Currently, there are 115 certified securities dealers licensed. No syndication permits were 
issued this fiscal year. 

Registration of Community Property Managers is required. Currently, there are 1 15 registrations. 
Total revenue received for processing applications and certificates of registration was $23,550. 

The total revenue received for all licenses, permits, fees, etc. was $7,594,356. 



176 CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 



Weights and Measures Division 

The primary objective of the division is to ensure that measurements are accurate, thereby 
protecting both buyer and seller in transactions involving determination of quantity by examining and 
testing weights and measures and testing weighing and measuring devices used by business and 
industry, federal, state and municipal governments and consumers. 

The Measurement Laboratory serves as the Measurement Center of the state, having custody of the 
physical standards of mass, length, volume and temperature (clinical thermometer standards). A 
primary responsibility of the laboratory program is maintaining National Institute of Standards and 
Technology certification and accreditation, in order to ensure certifiable calibration services. 
Calibration services are performed on standards used by Weights and Measures Inspectors, other state 
agencies, municipalities, registered dealers and repairmen of weighing and measuring devices, as 
well as for business and industry. The accuracy of Connecticut sealed clinical thermometers is assured 
by laboratory testing. 

The laboratory also offers measurement counsel and serves as a reference center in answering 
questions from both the public and private sectors and providing measurement assistance and 
guidance to industry, governmental agencies and educational institutions. 

During the past fiscal year, the division became responsible for two new programs. The Motor Fuel 
Quality Testing Program which includes the registrations of all brands of motor fuel and the testing 
of gasoline. The other program is the licensing of retail gasoline stations which was transferred from 
the Department of Motor Vehicles to this division in November. 

The division inspects and tests annually, all weighing and measuring devices used commercially, 
ranging from motor truck scales of 60 tons and more, to scales used in the buying and selling of 
precious metals and petroleum meters used at bulk storage terminals, to home delivery truck meters. 
New models of weighing and measuring devices are first examined and tested in the laboratory or out 
in the field, prior to their use, sale and distribution to be certain that they meet the requirements of the 
division. In addition, the division oversees and supplements work performed by Municipal Sealers 
of Weights and Measures as warranted. 

The division check-weighs, or measures commodities, to determine that they contain the amounts 
represented, eliminating fraud, carelessness and misrepresentation, so that both buyer and seller 
receive a correct weight or measure. The division is also responsible for two licensing functions: the 
registration of dealers and repairers of weighing and measuring devices, as well as the licensing of 
public weighers. 

The division is also responsible for the inspection, testing, certification and enforcement of the 
Energy Efficiency Standards, specifically: fluorescent luminaries and plumbing products (toilets, 
showerheads, faucets and aerators). Five hundred fifty -eight luminaries and 1 ,380 plumbing products 
were inspected. Eighty-seven new certifications and 49 tests were made on energy efficient fixtures. 
Twenty-four units were removed from sale. The compliance rate was 99 percent. 

Inspectors of the division participated in five days of training and educational seminars . There were 
10 hearings held and one arrest warrant was obtained. Eight days were spent in court testifying in 
overweight truck, short weight packaging and gasoline price sign violation cases. 

The division inspected and tested 10,526 scales, 19,759 gasoline dispensers, 1,613 home delivery 
fuel oil meters, 810 bulk fuel oil meters 252 liquified petroleum gas meters and 308 taxi cab meters. 
Eight hundred four miscellaneous devices were inspected and tested, 953 motor fuel consoles were 
inspected and 3,511 price signs were checked. The compliance rate for scales inspected was 94 
percent and for gasoline dispensers also 94 percent. Packages reweighed totaled 187,318, establish- 
ment stops 10,067. There were 3,927 laboratory tests and calibrations with 13,361 observations. Milk 
holding tanks, provers and tank truck calibrations totaled 530. Two hundred twenty five samples of 
gasoline were tested. The division received and investigated 195 complaints, issued 780 Public 
Weighers licenses, and 894 Dealers and Repairmen licenses. Revenues received totaled $1 86,788.94, 
which include $21 ,73 1 for laboratory calibrations and $1 ,213.44 for services provided to municipali- 
ties. In addition, the division collected $84,800 from the registration of motor fuel and $47,699.50 in 
retail gasoline licenses. 



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 177 

Office of Protection and Advocacy 
for Persons with Disabilities 

ELIOT J. DOBER, Executive Director 

Stanley Kosloski, Assistant Director 

Established - 1977 Statutory authority - Sec. 41a etal 

Central office - 60 B Weston St., Hartford, Conn. 06120 

Average number of full-time employees -45 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $1,889,786 and 

federal - $812,789 

• 

In its 15th year of operation the office handled over 6,500 requests for information and referral 
assistance; 1,176 individual advocacy cases; was involved in 1 10 legal cases; processed more 
than 970 abuse or neglect allegation cases, and provided advocacy training and support to more than 
2,000 individuals and more than 400 organizations. The most frequent problem areas experienced by 
people with disabilities included special education, employment discrimination, denial of financial 
entitlements, abuse of adults withmental retardation, and lack of community based living and support 
facilities. 

The Advocacy Office operates as a state-wide agency dealing with the wide variety of needs and 
discrimination problems faced by people with disabilities. The office has a toll-free, state-wide 
information and referral system to guide people to appropriate public and private agencies and 
services. The office operates a TDD number for deaf and hearing impaired people. 

The office has the authority to negotiate, arbitrate and represent issues before administrative bodies, 
and litigate before a court of law on behalf of an individual with a disability or a class of individuals 
with disabilities. A senior staff attorney directs these activities through the office's Legal Division. 
Staff advocates represent adults and children with disabilities who have educational, employment, 
housing, transportation and financial entitlement problems through the office's Advocacy Division. 

Community advocacy specialists assist community based groups in organizing as effective parent, 
or disability advocacy units through the Community Development Division. As the result of state 
legislation the office has the responsibility and authority to jointly approve with the state building 
inspector all requests for waivers from the sections of the state Building Code that concern 
accessibility standards, and the responsibility to investigate allegations of abuse of mentally retarded 
adults through the office's Abuse Investigation Division. 

Under federal regulations, the office advocates for clients of the Division of Rehabilitation Services 
or Board of Education for the Blind who are eligible for vocational services, and implements advocacy 
programs to support persons with the mental illness label. The office has a legislative specialist who 
introduces, tracks and advocates for legislation that will benefit people with disabilities. 

Department of Liquor Control 

WILLIAM W. SULLIVAN, Chairman 

Edward J. Jadovich, Director 

Established - 1933 Statutory authority - Chap. 545 

Central office - 165 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 45 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $1,592,726 

Capital outlay - $0 

• 

The commission is comprised of William W. Sullivan of Danbury as chairperson, Commissioner 
Walter S. Brooks of New Haven and Commissioner William G. Devine of East Hampton. The 
commission holds public hearings and meetings every Tuesday and Thursday. The head of daily 
operations is Director Edward J. Jadovich. 

This agency continues to execute its duties in interpreting and enforcing the provisions of the 
Liquor Control Act and Regulations of the department pertaining to importation, manufacturing and 
sale of alcoholic liquor. This duty includes approving the suitability of applicants and premises upon 
receipt of applications, the regulation of sale of alcoholic liquor and conduct of premises, investiga- 



178 CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

tion and adjudication of alleged violations, preventing fraud and unfair or illegal trade practices and 
circumvention of the law, registration of all brands of liquor sold in the state, enforcement of the 
pricing provisions of the Liquor Control Act and preventing the sale of liquor to minors and 
intoxicated persons. In this effort, during the past fiscal year, 756 new, 867 temporary and 6,490 
renewal applications were received. 

The commissioners held 218 hearings to consider applications for permits or to decide alleged 
violations of the law, and held 90 commission meetings. During the year total revenues were 
$6,835,735 compared to $6,698,301 for the previous fiscal year, an increase of $137,434. The 
revenues include: liquor permit fees $5,615,806; filing fees $180,070; substitution fees $18,120; 
registration of brands $296,069; fines in lieu of suspension $435,025 ; registration of salesman $ 1 ,575 ; 
miscellaneous $15,700. 

In addition to interpreting liquor laws, the commission is regularly called upon to consider and 
assess other legal issues affecting the rights and duties of its licensees, who may be conducting 
business on a local, national or international scale. Such issues have required the commissioners to 
become cognizant of laws in the field of civil rights, antitrust, bankruptcy, commercial law, property, 
contracts, probate and criminal law among others. The commission has responded to this challenge 
by identifying and cooperating with the other authorities and institutions necessarily involved. 

Examples of the commission's broadening scope of activity include, involvement in numerous 
matters with the Attorney General's Anti-Trust Division, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, the State 
Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, and the State Labor Department. The commission 
in conjunction with such organizations as R.I.D., S.A.D.D and M.A.D.D. as well as the restaurant, 
cafe and package store associations, and license holders has been conducting seminars promoting 
awareness of alcohol abuse and the identification of intoxicated persons and illegal selling of alcohol 
to minors. 

The agency is also constantly in the process of updating or deleting its regulations to fit a changing 
society. It has implemented changes mandated or recommended by the Legislature under the sunset 
review program. Also, where necessary, the agency continues to make its own recommendations to 
the legislature concerning statutory amendments. 

The Department of Liquor Control during the past year complied with all the practices to effectuate 
sections 4-61(b) to 4-61(i) inclusive of the General Statutes. 

Department of Public Utility Control 

CLIFTON A. LEONHARDT, Chairperson 

Established - 1911 Statutory authority - Sec. 16-19 

Central office - One Central Park Plaza, New Britain, Conn. 06051 

Average number of full time employees - 114 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $6,316,360 

Organization structure - Office of the Commissioners, Utility 

Regulation and Research Division, Advocacy and Regulatory 

Operations Division, and Adjudication Division 

The Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) has primary regulatory responsibility for 
investor -owned electric, gas, water telecommunications and cable television companies in 
Connecticut. The DPUC sets rates that assure safe, adequate and reliable service at the lowest possible 
cost. 

Decision-making responsibility resides with the Public Utilities Control Authority, five Com- 
missioners appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the legislature to serve four-year 
terms. 

The DPUC investigated six nuclear plant outages; approved the acquisition of Public Service of 
New Hampshire by Northeast Utilities, parent company of The Connecticut Light and Power 
Company; and approved a 3.96% rate increase for CL&P. The DPUC issued areport to the legislature 
on Public Act 91 -248 concerning conservation and economic development programs. In conformance 
with the Governor's economic development policies, the Department authorized the state's major 
investor-owned utilities to support a state marketing campaign and business response center managed 
by the Department of Economic Development. 

The DPUC initiated an investigation into the use of natural gas vehicles and began consideration 



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 179 

of a rate increase request from Yankee Gas. The DPUC issued two major water rate decisions, 
resolved a long-standing supply problem for a small water company, handled many requests for 
waivers from main extension regulations and issued numerous reports to the Department of 
Environmental Protection regarding water companies' individual conservation plans. In telecommu- 
nications the Department initiated a major investigation of infrastructure modernization, competition 
and local exchange structure. It also approved the Southern New England Telephone Company's 
application to offer "Caller ID" and granted seven cable television franchise renewals. 

During 1991-92, the DPUC received 260 new applications, held 333 days of public hearings and 
issued 152 final decisions. 

It oversaw or performed management audits involving electric, telecommunications and water 
utilities, performed 224 gas pipeline safety inspections and investigated two major gas safety 
incidents. Approximately 22,500 customer complaints were addressed. The DPUC continued its 
commitment to affirmative action. The Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities approved 
the 1991 affirmative action plan. 



Office of Consumer Counsel 

JOHN F. MERCHANT, Consumer Counsel 

Established - 1975 Statutory authority - Sec. 16-2a 

Central office - 136 Main St., Suite 501, New Britain, Conn. 06051 

Average number of full-time employees - 10 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $452,706 

• 

The Office of Consumer Counsel (OCC) is an independent state agency responsible for 
representing the interests of Connecticut's utility consumers. In this capacity, the OCC 
appears before state and federal regulatory agencies and in state and federal courts. The OCC's 
primary role, prosecuting cases favoring ratepayers, is contrasted with that of the Department of 
Public Utility Control (DPUC) which is to establish utility rates and the levels of service to he provided 
by public service companies. Millions of dollars are spent annually by utility companies seeking rate 
increases and other concessions . The costs of these efforts have been borne by Connecticut ratepayers . 
The OCC is mandated by statute to represent Connecticut ratepayer interests in such forums. 

A number of major utility initiatives were litigated during 1991-92. The Southern New England 
Telephone Company (SNETCO) rate case continued this fiscal year. SNETCO proposals concerning 
hundreds of millions of dollars in advanced telecommunications facilities and extended local calling 
were interwoven with proceedings on the status of telecommunications competition in Connecticut. 
The effects of gas from the Iroquois Pipeline on the purchased gas costs of Connecticut gas companies 
and the outages of Connecticut's four nuclear generating stations have resulted in new issues and new 
proceedings. 

The OCC's efforts have focused on removal of unjustifiable costs or mitigation of disruptive 
impacts. In Yankee Gas Services Company's $19 million rate increase proceedings, OCC pursued 
controlling expenses, moderating capital spending and gas supply costs. In the cases of telecommu- 
nications competition, infrastructure development and local calling areas, OCC's focus has been to 
balance the needs of all customer groups and avoid economic harm. Nuclear power plant outages have 
resulted in prudency cases involving each of Connecticut's nuclear generating facilities. In these cases 
OCC's comprehensive analysis, testimony where necessary and legal arguments have touched on 
every critical aspect. The DPUC's final decisions in a number of these cases have recognized 
significant elements in OCC's presentations, though sometimes offering rate increases at higher 
levels than recommended by OCC. 

The effects of Northeast Utilities' acquisition of the Public Service Company of New Hampshire, 
wholesale natural gas costs, the entry of AT&T, MCI, Sprint and others into portions of the intrastate 
telephone marketplace and the design of electric, gas and water conservation programs continued to 
receive considerable input from the OCC. 

The OCC is an equal opportunity employer committed to affirmative action. The agency remains 
committed to the letter and spirit of affirmative action. 



180 CONSUMER PROTECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

Connecticut Siting Council 

MORTIMER A. GELSTON, Chairman 

Established - 1971 Statutory authority - Sec. 16-50g - 16-50z, 

and 22a-114, 22a-132 

Central office - 136 Main St., Suite 401, New Britain, Conn. 06051 

Average number of full-time employees - 10 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $444,714 

Capital outlay - $7,646 

• 

Established July 1, 1971, to balance the need for adequate and reliable public service with the 
need to protect the state environment, including public health and safety, under Conn. Gen. 
Statutes Chapter 277a, the council regulates the siting of electric generating facilities and substations 
of utilities and large private power producers, fuel and electric transmission lines, community antenna 
television towers, cellular telephone towers and telecommunications towers owned or operated by the 
state or a public service company; under Chapter 445, hazardous waste management facilities; under 
Chapter 446a, low-level radioactive waste management facilities; and under Chapters 446d and 446e, 
ash residue management facilities. 

During fiscal year 1991-92, council membership for low-level radioactive waste and hazardous 
waste proceedings consisted of the following: Mortimer A. Gelston, chairman, Commissioner Susan 
S. Addiss, Commissioner Nicholas A. Cioffi, Gloria Dibble Pond, Harry E. Covey, Daniel P. Lynch, 
Jr., Paulann H. Sheets, Esquire, Dr. William H. Smith, Colin C. Tait, Esquire. Council membership 
for energy and telecommunications proceedings was the same, with the exception that the ex officio 
members were Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) Chairperson Clifton A. Leonhardt and 
Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Timothy R. E. Keeney. Through Chairman 
Gelston, the Council participates on the Connecticut Energy Advisory Board and the Interagency 
Electromagnetic Field Task Force; and has established subcommittees for environmental externali- 
ties and site banking. The council's Executive Director, Joel M. Rinebold, supervises staff, serves as 
the council's legislative liaison and manages the council's administrative and procedural activities. 
In 1 99 1 -92, the council held 1 public hearing sessions, 1 7 energy and telecommunications meetings, 
one hazardous waste meeting, and one low-level radioactive waste meeting. The council was also 
involved in several DPUC proceedings. 

The council ruled on 11 petitions for declaratory rulings for electric transmission, electric 
substation and cellular telephone facilities. Certificated facilities for this year consist of one electric 
substation facility, one electric transmission line facility, two cellular telephone facilities, two 
telecommunications tower facilities and one community antenna television facility. The council 
denied one proposed cellular telephone facility. Fifteen development and management plans for 
approved projects have been or are now being implemented under the management of council 
members and staff. The council ensures compliance within its orders through inspection during and 
after construction. In November 1991, the council reported on the 20-year forecasts of loads and 
resources of electric utilities. This forecast proceeding was held jointly with the DPUC to assess 
existing and planned electric generation, substations, and transmission facilities. The proceeding 
analyzed historical trends, the projected load demands, and the effectiveness of conservation and load 
management programs. The detailed report of these forecasts is published by the council annually. 
All proceedings of the council are held as contested cases under the Uniform Administrative 
Procedures Act and include a hearing with full opportunity for due process by all members of the 
public, parties and intervenors. 

In compliance with Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 4-61 (k), the council has adopted an affirmative action 
policy and designated an affirmative action officer. The council has also adopted an AIDS policy. 







CORRECTIONS 

AND 

RELATED SERVICES 



Department of Correction 

LARRY R. MEACHUM, Commissioner 

Established - 1968 Statutory authority - Chap. 325 

Central office - 340 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 4,804 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $248,310,810 

Capital outlay - $142,682,406 

Organization structure - Office of the Commissioner, 

Institutional Services Division, Programs and Treatment 

Division, Community Services Division, Administrative 

Services Division, and Health Services Division 

• 

The Department of Correction protects the community by providing fair, humane, safe and 
secure care for those remanded to it, and by intervening to reduce the criminality of those 
sentenced to its care. 

The fruits of prudent planning have become evident in the 1990s. The department's modem 
physical plant now complements its innovative programs. Four dormitory-style facilities have been 
constructed and dormitory expansions have been competed at four other sites, and one dormitory- 
style and three celled facilities are scheduled for occupancy next year. The population in older 
facilities continued to be reduced. The effect: a safer and more secure environment. 

The evolving, modem department also continued to serve as a comprehensive social welfare 
system, meeting the medical, mental health, educational, drug treatment and housing needs of 
thousands of people in Connecticut. 

On June 30, 1992, the department managed the lives of 16,721 people: 1 1,022 were incarcerated 
in 22 correctional institutions, correctional centers and detention centers; 5,699 were supervised in 
the community on parole or reentry furlough, in halfway houses or on supervised home release (SHR). 
The rate of growth in the number of people incarcerated lessened dramatically. 



j^per^pUJ^M 



Year (July 1) Incarcerated 



1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 



7,316 
8,899 
9,589 
10,814 
11,022 



In the 
Community 

2,515 
4,337 
6,379 
6,587 
5,699 



Total 

9,831 

13,236 

15,968 

17,401 

16,721 



J^ujation Supervised $i| 
Year(Julyl) SHR 


the Community 

Halfway 
Parole ¥T 

House 


Re-entry 
Furlough 


Total 


1988 


1,775 


387 276 


77 


2,515 


1989 


3,587 


355 316 


79 


4,337 


1990 


5,617 


365 355 


42 


6,379 


1991 


5,798 


392 373 


24 


6,587 


1992 


4,720 


602 339 


38 


5,699 



Parole numbers continued to lag behind projections. The increase in the number of those on parole 
did not compensate for the decrease in the number freed from incarceration on SHR, a program that 
by law became more restrictive and will be abolished next year. The effect: inmates will be incarcerated 
for longer periods and more beds will be required. 

Minority group representation in the workforce reached 30.7 percent; female representation, 25.7 
percent. In the protective services category, which includes correctional officers, the percentages 



182 



CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 183 

were 37.4 and 14.3 percent, respectively. Minority representation in management topped 23 percent, 
while females managers accounted for more than 33 percent of the total. 

Office of the Commissioner 
Communications 

Maintaining the department's commitment to openness, the communications office responded to 
2,036 inquiries from the print and broadcast media, and coordinated 121 facility tours for reporters 
and 282 interviews for reporters with staff and inmates. Public information officers for all facilities, 
units and community services offices were appointed and trained. The office inaugurated a program 
to educate the public about corrections through speaking engagements, talk programs and news 
features. Using its desktop publishing capability, the office also produced a variety of publications, 
including the 68-page Annual Report; The Correction Connection, a quarterly newsletter distributed 
to 5,000 employees and throughout the state and nation; and Monday Highlights, a weekly newsletter 
transmitted electronically to 32 facilities and units. 

Planning and Project Management 

With its focus as the revision of administrative directives and departmental regulations, the unit 
developed drafts that covered all departmental policies except health services. Fourteen directives 
were promulgated, four revised and five implemented: inmate population management, population 
counts, restrictive housing, security risk groups and transportation. The regulation on the capacity of 
the correctional system was revised. 

Security 

Staff conducted 40 formal investigations, 42 informal inquiries and 12 security audits; established 
intelligence operations to monitor, track and manage security risk groups and their members; and 
assisted local, state and federal law enforcement agencies in criminal investigations. 

Institutional Services Division 

Thomas F. White, Deputy Commissioner 

On June 30, 1992, 11,022 men and women were incarcerated in 22 correctional facilities in 
Connecticut. Of that total, 16.9 percent were held in pretrial status. Five security levels have been 
established for facilities and inmates. Correctional institutions (CIs) primarily house sentenced 
inmates; correctional centers (CCs), unsentenced offenders and sentenced inmates; and detention 
centers (DCs), unsentenced offenders. Institutions and centers hold adult males, with the exception 
of the Niantic CI, the only facility for females, and the Maloney CI and Manson Youth Institution ( YI), 
which hold males between the ages of 16 and 21. 

Bridgeport CC. A 208-bed dormitory opened in July 1992. A fire closed another dormitory for 
four months. Opened: 1871. Average population: 895. Security level: 4. 

Brooklyn CC. Safety and security improvements were completed. The facility contracted with an 
Easter Seals center for inmate work programs. Opened: 1842. Average population: 478. Security 
level: 4. 

Cheshire CI. The construction of 600 new cells continued. A shuttle bus for visitors and a Jaycees 
chapter were established, and a Spanish language program for staff implemented. Opened: 1910. 
Average population: 828. Security level: 4. 

Enfield CI. Six inmates received associate degrees; 92 attended college courses; and 65 earned 
general equivalency diplomas (GEDs). Approximately 1,200 inmates a month attended AA and NA 
programs. A community -based drug program and an extended family -visiting program were initiated, 
and a volleyball and two basketball courts constructed. Opened: 1959. Average population: 713. 
Security level: 4. 

Gates CI (Niantic). Security improvements were completed and two dormitories and a new 
gymnasium, dining hall, medical unit and commissary were constructed. A drama program, an 
addiction services acupuncture program, a tree farm and an community good-neighbor program were 
started. Opened: 1981. Average population: 478. Security level: 3. 

Hartell D WI CI (Windsor Locks). More than 42,000 hours of inmate labor were expended in fiscal 
year (FY) 1991-92 on community service projects at 15 sites. Opened: 1987. Average population: 
162. Security level: 2. 

Hartford CC. The business and human resources of the three facilities in Hartford were consolidated 
here. Work began on the conversion of a wing into the department's first acute mental health unit. 
Opened: 1977. Average population: 971. Security level: 4. 



184 CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

Jennings Road DC (Hartford). A new recreation yard was completed. New internal systems and 
procedures streamlined day-to-day processes. Inmate crews assisted the Boy Scouts and Department 
of Transportation projects. Opened: 1989. Average population: 112. Security level: 4. 

Litchfield CC. Planning was started to convert the center into a residential substance abuse facility, 
with a reduced inmate population. Opened: 1812. Average population: 116. Security level: 2. 

Maloney CI (Cheshire). The facility opened in April 1992 to provide addiction services and 
educational programs for young offenders. Opened: 1992. Average population: 42. Security level: 2. 

Manson YI (Cheshire). An assessment unit was created to enhance the delivery of services to 
inmates and allocate staff efficiently. A modified learning community was established to offer support 
services and foster life management skills. Opened: 1982. Average population: 686. Security level: 
3. 

Morgan Street DC (Hartford). Renovation work bathroom facilities and the lobby were started 
and a fitness center for staff installed. Opened: 1983. Average population: 186. Security level: 4. 

New Haven CC. The outpatient clinic and educational and processing spaces were renovated, and 
a parking garage completed. Opened: 1976. Average population: 663. Security level: 4. 

Niantic CI. Construction focused on renovating the Shaw Building and on court-mandated and 
other improvements. A Jaycee chapter for inmates was established. Opened: 1918. Average popu- 
lation: 617. Security levels: 2-5. 

Northeast CC (Storrs). The inmate population was increased to 350. Anew dining hall and kitchen 
were constructed and roofs, windows, and sidewalks replaced. Inmate work details in neighboring 
communities were initiated. Opened: 1989. Average population: 315. Security level: 2. 

Radgowski CC (Montville). An upgrade of the locking system was started, and the perimeter 
security system reinforced. The number of inmates involved in community services expanded, with 
inmates assisting an Easter Seals center and a waterfowl association, and speaking before civic 
groups. Opened: 1991. Average population: 302. Security level: 4. 

Robinson CI (Enfield). The inmate population was reduced in August. A new visiting center, 
basketball court, running track and parking lot were constructed, and a mental health component was 
added to the medical unit. Opened: 1985. Average population: 994. Security level: 3. 

Somers CI. The promulgation of security -risk-group restrictions and an increase in participation 
in educational programs led to a major reduction in violence. Thirty-eight inmates earned GEDs and 
seven received associate degrees. A behavior modification program was established in the segrega- 
tion unit. A 500,000-gallon water tower was constructed and a kitchen floor installed. Opened: 1963. 
Average population: 1,429. Security level: 5. 

Union Avenue DC (New Haven). The center processed 17,684 admissions during the year. 
Opened: 1984. Average population: 110. Security level: 4. 

Webster CI (Cheshire). A furlough orientation program was instituted and staff coordinated self- 
awareness seminars for the inmate population. Opened: 1990. Average population: 309. Security 
level: 2. 

Western Substance Abuse Treatment CI (Newtown). Staff developed a new program structure 
to enhance the programmatic environment. Through Convicts for Today 's Youth inmates shared their 
experiences with the public. Opened: 1989. Average population: 149. Security level: 2. 

Willard CI (Enfield). A new dental office, storage garage and athletic area were constructed. 
Cocaine Anonymous meetings were started. Opened: 1990. Average population: 309. Security level: 
2. 

Programs and Treatment Division 

W. Lee Palmer Jr., Deputy Commissioner 
The department offers a variety of institutional and community -based programs to promote the 
social, educational, vocational and spiritual growth of offenders, and to enable them to develop the 
tools necessary for successful reintegration into society. 

Addiction Services 

Addiction Services intervenes at every level of confinement and during community supervision 
through a continuum of substance abuse programs: assessment, primary treatment, self-help fellow- 
ships and aftercare counseling. In FY 1 99 1 -92, the department identified 79. 2 percent of the supervised 
population as substance abusers in need of treatment. Staff conducted 24,627 individual counseling 
sessions, 2,934 AA meetings, 1,917 NA meetings and 9,699 hours of group counseling in facilities. 
In community programs, 23,684 clients received aftercare services, including 15,767 individual 
counseling sessions and 5,154 hours of group counseling. 



CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 185 

Educational Services 

Unified School District No. 1 offers instructional services to incarcerated inmates: adult basic 
education, preparation for the GED, English as a second language, special education, instruction in 
vocational and technical trades, and post- secondary opportunities. Schools in 20 facilities served 
9,650 students during the year. Instruction for youthful offenders increased by 28 percent and for the 
educationally handicapped by 26 percent. A total of 691 inmates earned GEDs, and 463 earned 
certificates in the district's 30 vocational training programs. More than 400 inmates completed 
college courses, and 10 received associate's degrees. The district became the first correctional 
educational system to use microwave technology for student instruction. And the academic, vocational 
and technical curricula were reformatted into a competency-based, modular system. 

Offender Classification and Population Management 

This unitmanages the inmate classification system, population distribution and central records, and 
coordinates transportation and interstate compact agreements. The capacity of correctional facilities 
was increased to 9,953 in February 1 992. By statute, facilities may hold 110 percent of capacity, a total 
of 10,948 inmates, or 10,330menand618 women. During FY 1991-92, the male population exceeded 
statutory capacity on 80 days, the female population on 245 days. Neither population exceeded 
statutory capacity for more than 30 consecutive days. The Central Transportation Unit became fully 
operational in April 1992 to transport inmates and conduct interstate transfers. Interstate agreements 
were established with Oklahoma and Kentucky, bringing the total to 26. 

Prison Industries 

Industries employed approximately 400 inmates to reduce idleness and enable them to earn money 
and develop marketable skills. The unit sold more than $4 million in products and services to state, 
municipal and nonprofit agencies during the year. Workers in the private sector program alone paid 
more than $50,000 in taxes, for child support and room and board, and to the Criminal Injuries 
Compensation Fund. 

Recreational Services 

Recreation and leisure-time activities are made available to inmates at all facilities. Several 
community service activities were inaugurated, such as quilt-making for infants born with a drug 
dependency or AIDS, choir concerts, and the growing of vegetables for food banks and soup kitchens. 

Religious Services 

Every facility has a religious services coordinator responsible for providing pastoral care. Staff also 
perform crisis intervention services for inmates and staff alike, and served as members of the agency's 
Critical Incident Response Team. During the year, the unit conducted 5,904 worship and study 
sessions for 90,648 inmates, scheduled 15,840 counseling sessions for 21,312 inmates, and coordi- 
nated religious programming for inmates and outreach programs in the community. 

Volunteer Services 

This unit promotes the involvement of community volunteers throughout the correctional system 
to augment and enhance staff. During the year, 1,985 volunteers contributed 90,966 hours to inmate 
programs. Their activities included cross-cultural and recreational events, inmate restitution and arts 
projects, educational and counseling sessions, and community, religious and one-on-one support 
services. 

Community Services Division 

Todd N. Fisk, Administrator 

Supervision through treatment remained the cornerstone of the division as its staff and contractors 
in five regions served more than 17,000 individuals in FY 1991-92. The increased use of community 
alternatives reflected the division's efforts for inmates to remain crime- and drug-free. 

Community addiction staff supplied comprehensive services to 4,727 inmates. All contracted 
programs were inspected during the year and monitored for program compliance, with increased 
accountability the goal. 

A total of 1,513 inmates participated in community release programs at halfway houses and other 
residential treatment programs. An additional 882 parolees, inmates on SHR and others in alternative 
incarceration centers participated in the department's residential programs. A residence in Waterbury 
was expanded and construction began on an additional 18 beds in Brooklyn, 15 in New Haven and 
20 in Norwalk. 



186 CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

The department contracted with 23 nonprofit agencies for reentry support and services for more 
than 12,000 offenders who were discharged or placed in community supervision. Employment, 
education or training was located for 1,754 individuals, and housing in the community for 763. 

The number of inmates on SHR fell by 18.6 percent. The parole population increased 53.6 percent; 
1 62 out-of-state parolees were admitted under the interstate parole compact. Approximately one-half 
of all women in custody were on parole or SHR. Sixty officers supervised a total of 15,5 1 offenders 
on parole or SHR during the year. At year-end, a parole officer supervised an average of 95 offenders. 

This year counselors and officers initiated a refined team-management model, blending their roles 
into a collaborative effort when conducting orientation, needs assessments and progressive disci- 
plines and referrals, and setting supervisory standards. 

Bridgeport Region 

Approximately 150 clients successfully completed the addiction services program. The rate of 
bed-use in residential programs exceeded 97 percent. New guidelines for processing community 
release applications were issued, and staff initiated a weekly spiritual fellowship group. 

Hartford Region 

This region supervised 6,907 offenders; addiction services assisted 1,891; and community services 
provided treatment for 3,230. Contractors joined a new client orientation program. 

New Haven Region 

Staff established a closer working relationship with the New Haven Police Department and the 
Hispanic Treatment Clinic at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. 

New London Region 

Staff and volunteers completed the standardization of inmate records, implemented an ex -offenders 
support group, developed community activities and resources, and expanded treatment services and 
programs for inmates. 

Waterbury Region 

Contractors offered specialized programs at the regional office, such as anger management, 
parenting and job development. The unit also placed 25 potential violators in residential programs 
funded by other organizations. 

Administrative Services Division 

Theresa C. Lantz, Deputy Commissioner 
The division establishes and provides a coordinated program of services to agency personnel by 
enhancing their professionalism and well-being, and to agency operations by advising in the areas of 
facility construction and management, fiscal operations, human resources, organizational design, 
research and statistical analysis, strategic planning and technology implementation. 

Affirmative Action 

Equal opportunity through affirmative action planning underscores the department's hiring and 
promotion practices. Total minority group representation in the workforce reached 30.7 percent. 
Female representation stood at 25 .7 percent. The unit trained 646 employees in equal opportunity laws 
and cultural and sexual harassment issues. New affirmative action and sexual harassment polices were 
issued. 

Employee Assistance Program (EAP) 

EAP focuses on issues, problems and concerns that affect the ability of staff to perform their duties. 
During the year, staff served 524 clients, conducted more than 1,000 presentations, and received a 
monthly average of 47 calls on the EAP hot line. Fifty-three staff were certified in the Critical Incident 
Stress Response Program and 45 managers were given an overview of the program: post-trauma 
briefings, intervention processes and attending and continuing recovery skills. 

Employee-Centered Programs (ECP) 

ECP administers proactive programs for staff and their families. It coordinated the Dependent Care 
Assistance Program and 10 health fairs that attracted 1,103 employees; sponsored 10 sessions of a 
stress-management program for 275 staff; initiated smoking -cessation and eyecare programs; estab- 



CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 187 

lished a child-care referral system; organized a family support group; conducted a wellness survey; 
and formulated a departmental safety plan. 

Engineering Services 

Charged with administering and reviewing the department's engineering, construction, mainte- 
nance and real estate functions, the unit monitored the completion of projects totalling $84,896,186 
in FY 1991-92: one institution, five dormitories and 40 projects ranging from structural repairs to 
security upgrades to safety improvements. Sixty-two projects with an estimated cost of $10,199,290 
were started; and 1,526,060 pounds of recyclable items were removed from the wastestream. 

Fiscal and Administrative Services 

This unit coordinates and controls the department's general, enterprise and fiduciary funds, plans 
and directs the preparation of the budget and monitors for compliance with governmental standards 
and accounting principles. Staff installed an electronic fund-transfer system for inmates, a pilot 
commissary and inmate account system at a facility and a modified time-and-attendance system at the 
four facilities. Twenty separate welfare funds were consolidated into one general fund. In FY 1991- 
92, the average daily expenditure per inmate was $56.98, or $20,797.70 annually, an annual reduction 
of $715.40 when compared with the previous year. 

Human Resources 

The unit recruits staff and promotes their personal and professional growth. A workers' compen- 
sation section was established to reduce the number of workplace injuries and illnesses and the time 
lost to claims, and reduced workers' compensation spending by $708,078. Recruiting interviewed 
1,808 correction officer candidates, hiring 388 for training classes, and tested 629 employees for 
promotional opportunities. Labor relations held 208 step-3 hearings, with the agency upheld in all but 
1 1 , and held 1 8 arbitration hearings, with all but one upheld. Budgetary issues forced the issue of 140 
layoff and 940 reduced-workweek notices, though they were later rescinded. 

Research and Management Information Systems 

In this multileveledunit, the research section models, analyzes, projects, and develops reports from 
the inmate database, while the MIS section plans, develops and maintains computerized information 
systems and technology architectures and standards. Research obtained a $25,000 grant from the 
National Institute of Correction to develop a model to forecast incarcerated population levels, and 
responded to more than 1 ,000 requests for information. MIS installed a point-of-sale commissary pilot 
program and developed the specifications and requirements for a reception and classification project. 

Training and Staff Development 

The Center for Training and Staff Development in Storrs trains staff to improve job performance 
and foster personal and professional development. The Center processed five pre-service orientation 
classes this year, containing a total of 438 trainees, 88 percent of whom were correctional officers. 
Staff conducted in-service training programs, ranging from stress management to budget administra- 
tion to management excellence, for 22,956 total participants. 

Health Services Division 

Janice M. Gruendel, Director 

The department's health-care system supplies timely, high-quality medical, dental, pharmacy and 
mental-health services to the incarcerated. The division contains four units: field services, clinical 
practice, quality assurance and operational support. Field services was organized into a five-region 
configuration, each with an on-call physician at all times. Also, the psychiatric on-call system was 
reestablished. 

In FY 1991-92 the division operated seven 24-hour outpatient centers, and four inpatient units 
containing approximately 60 beds. Staff recorded more than 271,906 patients at regular and emer- 
gency sick call; conducted 69,259 intake screenings and 14,6 12 physicals; and ordered 2, 153 emergency 
room visits. 

The division established a mortality review process to enhance care delivery, and a utilization 
committee to review outside referrals and non-emergent surgery requests. 

Staff initiated universal screening for tuberculosis, hepatitis vaccinations for employees, and an 
inmate medical and mental health classification system to match patients with appropriate care units. 
It also established isolation booths for respiratory treatment and diagnostic studies, obtained cryosurgery 



188 CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 

apparatus for every region and introduced new modes of immuno-deficiency treatment. 

The department contracted with Yale -New Haven Hospital for infectious-disease services, and the 
results of a collaborative study between staff and the Yale University AIDS Program were reported 
at the World AIDS Conference in Amsterdam. 

For the first time the dental unit was able to supply on-site services, such as prophylaxis, in addition 
to emergency services. 

Pharmacies filled 307,666 prescriptions during the year at an average cost of $7.76 per prescription. 
The regional pharmacy program reduced the total drug inventory from $610,438 to $284,446, and 
centralized the distribution of screening tests and medical, dental and contingency supplies. 



Board of Parole 

PASQUALE A. MANGINI, Chairman 

Edward R. Braren Assistant to the Chairman 

Established - 1968 Statutory authority - Sec. 54-124a - 54-131g 

Central office - 90 Brainard Rd., Hartford, Conn. 06114 

Average number of full-time employees - 8 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $260,514 

• 

The Connecticut Board of Parole is an autonomous agency, but it is assisted with administrative 
support by the Department of Correction. The Connecticut Board of Parole is authorized to 
grant paroles to individuals in state correctional institutions when they become eligible, in accordance 
with these sentencing statutes. The board's primary responsibilities include granting parole, denying 
parole, establishing the conditions and provisions of parole, revoking parole, rescinding parole, and 
granting discharge from parole. Services and supervision for individuals paroled by the board are the 
responsibility of the Department of Correction, Division of Community Services, and consequently, 
although separate agencies, the two departments have related responsibilities and function coopera- 
tively. The board schedules individuals for parole hearings approximately four months prior to their 
earliest parole eligibility dates. This allows individuals granted parole sufficient time to develop their 
parole programs and also gives the Department of Correction an opportunity to review those individu- 
als who have been granted parole for reductions in custody, placement in community release facilities 
and furloughs. 

Each individual appearing before a panel of the board is heard and informed personally of the 
panel's decision. When parole is denied, the reasons for denial are given to the individual, along with 
the date for reconsidered. Hearings for individuals who are serving their Connecticut sentences in 
other states are ordinarily conducted in their absence. Hearings by telephone, however, are made 
available in such cases. 

Parole hearings have been determined by the courts and the Freedom of Information Commission 
to be open to the public. State law allows crime victims, their families, or legal representatives, to 
appear before panels of the board, and permits them to make statements concerning whether the 
inmate should be released on parole or the nature of any terms or conditions to be imposed upon any 
such release. The board is also required to notify any victim authorized to appear at a hearing of the 
date, time and place of the hearing, if such victim has requested the notice and has provided a current 
mailing address. During this fiscal year, numerous victims and families of victims have appeared and 
testified before panels of the board. 

In the fiscal year the board held hearings on 1 14 days. A total of 506 individuals were granted 
parole, including individuals who were paroled again after having their paroles revoked or rescinded, 
299 were denied parole, 1,342 cases were continued, 34 paroles were rescinded and 44 paroles 
revoked. In total, 90 parolees were successfully discharged from parole at the expiration of their parole 
terms. 

Conn. Gen. Statutes Sees. 54-13 la through 54-131g give the board the authority to grant medical 
parole to any sentenced inmate who suffers from a terminal illness, and who is so incapacitated by 
the illness as to be incapable of posing a threat to society. Panels of the board granted 15 medical 
paroles during the fiscal year. 



CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 189 

Other actions taken by the board included the review, reconsideration and revision of previous 
actions. Actions by the board in all categories totalled 3,359 compared with a total of 612 actions taken 
in the previous fiscal year. 

This increase in board activity, as reflected by these figures, is the result of Conn. Gen. Statutes 
Section 54 125a, which gives the board the authority to grant parole to felony offenders serving 
definite sentences in excess of one year. It is anticipated that board activity will continue to increase 
over the next several years as the full impact of this law are realized. 

The procedures of the board are in conformity with state and federal laws. Board members are 
appointed by the Governor. The board chairman is the only full-time member and acts as its 
administrative officer. Pasquale A. Mangini is Chairman of the Parole Board. In addition to the 
chairman, the board is comprised of the following members: Kathleen Armentano of Enfield; Rocco 
Benvenuto of Riverside; Michael A. DeJoseph, Sr. of Sandy Hook; Charles Kiernan of Old Lyme, 
who resigned from his position in May 1992; Ermen J. Pallanck of Union; Elizabeth Parish of 
Bloomfield; Wilfrido Ramos of Bridgeport; Arnold Schwolsky of Avon; Wilber G. Smith of Hart- 
ford; and Francis C. Stevens of Woodstock. 



Sheriffs Advisory Board/County Sheriffs Agency 

GEORGE R. ZEEB, Chairman 

Established - 1980 Statutory authority - Sec. 6-32a 

Central office - 84 Wadsworth St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 33 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $16,459,424 

Capital outlay - $13,019 

• 

The Sheriffs' Advisory Board was established for the purpose of operating a prisoner transpor 
tation and courthouse security system. It is an autonomous agency which administers its own 
budget and appropriated funds. 

The board is under the Office of the Comptroller for administrative purposes only. The Comptroller's 
office provides technical administrative advice to the County Sheriffs' Agency. 

The board has met on an as needed basis to direct the County Sheriffs' Agency and high sheriffs 
who operate the prisoner transportation/courthouse security system. 

The board cooperated with the Department of Administrative Services and other state agencies on 
behalf of the high sheriffs and the prisoner transportation and courthouse security system; established 
operating procedures for the system and directed its activities as required for efficient coordination 
among the high sheriffs; established and administered the state appropriations allotted for these 
purposes. 

There are five board members and four alternates as mandated by the state law. The members are 
George R. Zeed, chairman, high sheriff of Middlesex County; Honorable Aaron Ment, chief court 
administrator; Larry R. Meachum, commissioner of the Department of Corrections; Alfred J. Rioux, 
high sheriff of Hartford County, and William E. Curry, Jr., state comptroller. 



190 CORRECTION AND RELATED SERVICES 




CHILDREN AND YOUTH 



Department of Children and Youth Services 



ROSE ALMA SENATORE, Commissioner 
Robert W. Werner, Deputy Commissioner 
Sharon A. Martin, Deputy Commissioner 
Established - 1970 Statutory authority - Sec. 17a-2 
Central office - 170 Sigourney St., Hartford, Conn. 06105 
Average number of full-time employees - 1,783 
Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 -$177,915,907 
Capital outlay - $282,885 
Organization structure - Office of the Commissioner: Equal Employment Opportu- 
nity, Children's Trust Fund, and Public Relations; Deputy Commissioner - 
Administration: Fiscal Services, Management Information Services, Revenue 
Enhancement, Private Provider Financial Services, Project Management, Person- 
nel, Licensing and Quality Assurance, and Policy; Deputy Commissioner - Pro- 
gram Services: Health Management, Juvenile Justice, Planning and Program 
Development, Educational Services, Training Academy, and Regional Operations 




The Department of Children and Youth Services (DCYS) is responsible for child protective, 
mental health, juvenile justice, substance abuse treatment and prevention services for the 
state's children and youth. Services are offered through six regional and seven sub-regional offices 
to Connecticut's 169 municipalities. 

Regional management enables the department to plan, develop and coordinate programs that 
reflect the ethnic, cultural and linguistic character of the communities which they serve. Programs so 
established become rooted in the communities and can be expected to enjoy greater support and use 
by the families residing in the regions . Additionally, consumers of services — f amilies — are afforded 
greater opportunity to have input in the development and assessment of programs under such a model. 

Each of the six regions has a 21 member Regional Advisory Council, appointed by the commis- 
sioner, to advise the commissioner and regional management on the development and implementation 
of services. 

The department also operates seven facilities which offer specialized services to Connecticut's 
children and youth. These are: Henry D. Altobello Children and Youth Center in Meriden, a 
psychiatric hospital for adolescents 14-17 years of age; RiverView Hospital for Children in 
Middletown, a psychiatric hospital for children ages 5-13; Housatonic Adolescent Hospital in 
Newtown, psychiatric hospital for adolescents ages 14 - 17; High Meadows, a residential treatment 
facility in Hamden for severely emotionally disturbed children ages 6-15; Long Lane School, the 
state's institution for adjudicated delinquent adolescents located in Middletown; the State Receiving 
Home in Warehouse Point, an emergency residential center for children and youth; and the 
Wilderness School in East Hartland, an outdoor experiential education program for youth. 

The commissioner of DCYS is advised by a State Advisory Council on Children and Youth 
Services (SAC), a 15 -member advisory group whose membership is appointed by the Governor. SAC 
members during fiscal year 1991-92 included: Jean Adnopoz, Chairperson; Albert Alissi, D.S.W.; 
Priscilla August; Lucy Barrett; John Blanton, M.D.; Patricia Blumenthal; Jane Bourns; William 
Breetz; Lisa Michaud; Elise Mooney; Connor Anne Ryan; Tyheshia Saucier; Sister Sandra Shaw; 
Mark Simms, M.D.; and Joseph Woolston, M.D.. 



192 



CHILDREN AND YOUTH 193 



Agency Mission 

The Department of Children and Youth Services, in partnership with service providers, plans, 
provides, funds and coordinates the development of a continuum of integrated services for children 
in need of protection, mental health, juvenile justice and substance abuse services. These services 
shall promote the development of permanent stable settings, where the children are free from harm 
and able to achieve their potential. 

Guiding Principles: 

• The Child is the client. 

• Children are best raised in families. 

• The best interest of the Child is of primary consideration. 

• Services are sensitive to a Child's sense of time. 

• Services should be home-based or in least restrictive settings, closest to home and culturally 
competent. 

Goals: 

• Maintain Child with a family setting. 

• Create integrated community and agency responses to department mandates. 

• Increase public awareness of agency services. 

• Improve overall quality of service delivery. 

• Increase prevention efforts. 

• Demonstrate that employees are valued. 

The mission statement and operating principles provide the framework for a service delivery 
system that is committed to preserving and strengthening families so they may care for their own 
children, while at the same time ensuring that children are safe and have opportunities for health 
development. 

Code of Fair Practices/Affirmative Action 

The department is committed to an aggressive and comprehensive affirmative action plan to assure 
equal employment opportunity and to provide services and programs to the public in a fair and 
impartial manner. It is the department's objective to ensure the full and fair use in the work force of 
women, blacks, Hispanics, physically or mentally disabled persons, older persons, and other 
protected class citizens. 

The department fully supports the state Code of Fair Practices and federal and constitutional 
mandates concerning affirmative action and equal employment opportunity. In line with its commit- 
ment, the agency will not do business knowingly with any contractor, subcontractor, or supplier of 
material who discriminates against members of protected classes. 

Affirmative action and equal employment are immediate and priority objectives, and play an 
important and necessary role in all stages of the employment process. The affirmative action and 
personnel officers conduct a vigorous recruitment program and provide staff orientation, training, 
upward mobility and employment counseling, and handle discrimination grievance procedures. The 
mission of the upward mobility program is to maximize opportunities for employees, particularly 
protected classes, to progress to higher and more satisfying levels of responsibility within a profession 
or occupation. 

Of all full-time department employees, 73.9 percent are protected-class persons and 30.6 percent 
are members of minority groups . Of the 21 2 full-time employees hired in the 1 99 1 -92 fiscal year, 85 .4 
percent were in protected classes, and 43.9 percent are members of minority groups. Promotions for 
full-time staff total 164, and of these, 84.8 percent were protected classes, and 36.6 percent were 
minorities. 

Children's Trust Fund 

The Children's Trust fund was established by the General Assembly in 1985 to raise funds for and 
promote child abuse prevention activities. Several fund raising activities were held and the fund was 
able to provide four grants in the amount of SI 5,000 each for prevention programs. 

Public Relations Unit 

The Public Relations Unit is responsible for keeping the public informed about department 
activities. The unit maintains positive press relations and provides prompt and accurate information 
about the department in response to public inquiries. During fiscal year 199 1 -92, the unit initiated an 
employee newsletter DCYS Information Update, and provided staff support for regional service 
provider forums which provided the basis for a department directory of community services. 



194 CHILDREN AND YOUTH 



Regional Offices 

Region I serves 14 southwestern Connecticut area towns from offices in Bridgeport and Stamford. 
The region opened a total of 2,336 cases and closed 2,181 cases during the fiscal year, handling an 
average daily caseload of 1,086. 

Region II serves 22 southcentral Connecticut communities from offices located in Hamden and 
Meriden. The average daily caseload for the region during FY 91-92 was 1,886, with 3,073 cases 
opened and 2,826 cases closed. 

Region III serves 36 towns in southeastern Connecticut from offices in Norwich and Middletown. 
Region HI opened a total of 2,563 cases, closed 1,513 cases, with an average daily caseload of 1,370 
for the fiscal year. 

Region IV serves 20 northcentral Connecticut towns from offices in Hartford and New Britain. The 
region opened a total of 2,941 cases and closed 2,021 cases during the fiscal year. The average daily 
caseload was 3,094. 

Region V provides services to 42 towns in northwestern Connecticut from offices in Waterbury, 
Danbury andTorrington. Region V opened 2,353 cases, closed 1,774 cases, and had an average daily 
caseload of 1,506 in FY 91-92. 

Region VI serves 35 northeas tern Connecticut communities . These services are provided out of two 
offices, located in Willimantic and Rockville. The region's average daily caseload was 1,446 during 
the fiscal year, with a total of 1,469 cases opened and 1,137 cases closed. 

Hospitals and Residential Facilities 

RiverView Hospital for Children in Middletown is a 50-bed psychiatric hospital serving children 
ages 4 through 13. RiverView is a training center for mental health professionals in affiliation with 
the Yale Child Study Center, the University of Connecticut School of Social Work and the Middlesex 
Community College Human Service Program. The hospital is accredited by JC AHO and is Title XIX 
certified. 

The Henry D. Altobello Children and Youth Center is a 57-bed psychiatric hospital located in 
Meriden serving 14-17 year-old youths whose severity of illness precludes evaluation or treatment 
in community-based or outpatient settings. During the 1991-92 fiscal year, construction began for a 
new psychiatric hospital for adolescents to replace the Meriden facility. The new facility, located 
adjacent to RiverView Hospital, is scheduled to be completed by spring 1993. 

Altobello evaluated and/or treated 167 adolescent during the fiscal year, including 140 new 
admissions. The hospital is also a training center for mental health professionals in social work and 
is affiliated with the University of Connecticut School of Social Work and for selected psychology 
students from Central Connecticut 



State University. Altobello is ac- 
credited by JCAHO and is certified 
by Title XIX 



Child Abuse and Neglect Investigations and Caseloads 



1990-91 1991-92 Change 
Housatonic Adolescent Hospital Investigations* 13,487 14,369 +6.5% 

Average Daily Case Load 13,032 13,414 +2.9% 
* Indicates those referrals accepted for investigation 



is a psychiatric facility located on 
the grounds of Fairfield Hills Hos- 
pital in Newtown. It services the 
western third of the state, encom- 
passing DCYS Regions I and V. The hospital provides a full array of treatment services to youngsters 
ages 14-17 and their families. During the fiscal year 126 patients were treated, including 70 new 
admissions. The hospital is JCAHO accredited and certified by Title XIX. 

High Meadows Residential Treatment Center, located in Hamden, provides an array of services for 
emotionally disturbed children ages 6-15, including a day-treatment program, group residence, 
residential treatment and a short-term diagnostic emergency placement program. During fiscal year 
1991-92, 85 children were served at High Meadows, including 29 new admissions. 

Long Lane School, located in Middletown, is the state' s juvenile correctional facility for committed 
delinquents and headquarters for delinquency Parole Services. DCYS delinquency programs goals, 
within the context of care and custody, include individualized treatment planning, community 
protection, and family reunification. Long Lane and the Parole Service program components served 
juvenile offenders in various levels of supervision, including maximum security. The facility had 316 
new admissions, and its average daily census was 192 in fiscal year 1991-92. The Parole Department 
supervise youth released from Long Lane, plus 240 new commitments placed directly into alterna- 
tives to Long Lane. 

During the 1 99 1 -92 fiscal year, a 20-bed Medium Secure Unit and a new six-bed transitional living 



CHILDREN AND YOUTH 



195 



cottage were opened, and the renovation of Briggs Cottage provided 27 beds to relieve overcrowding 
in other cottages. 

Long Lane School received one of seven national awards from the Federal Office of Social 
Responsibility for a vocational industries initiative. As a result, staff have received technical 
assistance and training to develop a facility-based vocational program. The program will involve a 

private employer who provides 
paid work experiences leading 
to practical job skills. Long 
Lane also established a job site 
in cooperation with a local in- 
surance company. 

The State Receiving Home 
is a 54-bed program located in 
Warehouse Point, that provides 
residential care and evaluation 
for children ages 6-17 who are 
active protective services cases 
and whose circumstances or 
behavior preclude placement 
in a less-restrictive setting. The purpose of residence at the home is to stabilize the child's behavior 
and evaluate future placement and treatment needs. During the fiscal year, 195 children received 
services at the State Receiving Home, including 153 new admissions. The average daily census was 
47.4. 



Long Lane School/Parole Services Activity 

1990-91 1991-92 


Change 


Average Daily Population at 


173 


192 


+ 


Long Lane 






10.9% 


Total Served at Long Lane 


624 


650 


+ 4.2% 


Serious Juvenile Offender 


59 


63 


+6.8% 


Admissions 








Commitments to Parole 


199 


240 


+20.6% 


Total Population Served 


1,117 


1,104 


-1.2% 


(Long Lane and Parole) 









Division of Children's Protective Services 

The Division of Children's Protective Services manages the CARELINE, the Adoption Resource 
Exchange, and three Interstate Compacts on the supervision, placement and return of children across 
state boundaries. 

CARELINE is a 24 hour, seven-day-a-week emergency service for the protection of children from 
abuse, neglect and abandonment. During fiscal year 1991-92, CARELINE received a total of 24,1 12 
calls. CARELINE personnel took 4,914 calls from mandated reporters and the general public 
regarding allegations of abuse and neglect. CARELINE supervisors dispatched 1,029 social workers 
to deal with emergency cases after -hours and on weekends. CARELINE also responded to 2,702 
requests for informational services to parents and families regarding child development, parenting 
skills, support groups, Parents Anonymous, community services and foster care issues. 

A total of 239 children were newly registered and 227 were placed through the Adoption Resource 
Exchange during the fiscal year. Of this total, 144 minority children were newly registered and 146 
minority children were placed. 

More children with special needs are being adopted in Connecticut through subsidized adoptions. 

A total of 348 subsidized adoptions were finalized during fiscal year 1 99 1 -92, representing 95 percent 

I of all adoptions where DC YS is the statutory parent. Increasing numbers of foster parents are adopting 

their foster children. In fiscal year 1 986-87, only 48 percent of adoptions were by foster parents, while 

i in fiscal year 1991-92, 65 percent (224) of adoptions were foster parent adoptions. 

The Interstate Compacts Office administers three statutory compacts between Connecticut and 
other states concerning placement, supervision and return of children across state boundaries. In fiscal 
year 1991-92, the office responded to 19,820 telephone calls and mail inquiries regarding services for 
these children. 

At the end of fiscal year 1992, 1 ,041 children were receiving active services through the Placement 
Compact (adoption, foster care, relative and child-caring placements and supervision). The Juvenile 
Compacthas 67 probationers and parolees under supervision, and serviced 74 runaways, escapees and 
absconders. A total of 13 unaccompanied refugee minors are being served, and 267 children were 
serviced through Interstate Compacts to receive medical coverage. 

Substance Abuse Services 

The Substance Abuse Services Unit addresses substance abuse-related policy, planning and 
funding in keeping with the department's mission and mandate. During the past year, the unit obtained 
a four-year federal grant to provide case management services in Hartford, New Haven and 
Bridgeport, for adolescents with substance abuse problems. The programs focus on youth on parole 
from Long Lane School as well as community youth at risk of involvement in the juvenile justice 
J system due to substance abuse. The program will assist the 34 percent of youth adjudicated delinquent, 



196 CHILDREN AND YOUTH 



who are committed for drug -related offenses. 

Also, eight substance abuse prevention programs placed additional emphasis on outreach to 
involve the parents of maltreated children. Working with regional protective services staff, approxi- 
mately 250 parents were offered programs which supported their children's learning experiences. 
Children were provided with services designed to increase their skills in communication, assertiveness, 
conflict resolution, refusal and stress management. An additional 20,000 children and youth annually 
received substance abuse prevention services through department-supported programs. 

Mental Health Unit 

The Mental Health Unit provides technical assistance to DCYS staff and service providers, 
disseminating information, serving as liaison to other state and federal agencies, developing standards 
of practice and models of care and evaluating programs. The unit has primary responsibility for the 
development of the state's Child and Adolescent Service Program (CASSP), which will address the 
needs of seriously emotionally disturbed children and youth. 

Division of Planning and Program Development 

The Division of Planning and Program Development supports, develops and assists community- 
based programs for children and their families. These programs reflect a continuum of care from 
prevention to out-of-home residential treatment in the areas of mental health, juvenile justice, child 
welfare and substance abuse. The division is responsible for the agency 's planning function, including 
the preparation of the Child Welfare, Juvenile Justice and other plans. 

The division also administers the agency's Wilderness School, located in East Hartland. 

Training Academy 

During fiscal year 1991-92 the department opened a full service training academy in Bridgeport. 
The Training Academy is designed to improve training for all aspects of department operations and 
to prepare a well- trained staff for all levels from management to direct services utilizing competency- 
based curriculum. The academy also administers the Social Work Internship Program and the Tuition 
Reimbursement Program. 

Division of Education 

The Division of Education provides educational program and services at department facilities 
through the Unified School District II (USD II) and assists regional office staff in matters involving 
the educational needs of children within the care of the department. USD II also has education 
jurisdiction for children who have been placed by DCYS in private residential f acilities and for whom 
no other school district has jurisdiction. 

During fiscal year 1991-92, new program development supported by the school district included 
a commitment obtained from the Waterbury School District to work cooperatively to design and pilot 
a transitional reentry program for youth returning to Waterbury from Long Lane School. 

In addition, USD II fully implemented a computerized Individualized Education Program (IEP) 
system to ensure the consistent and efficient development of quality IEP's in a timely manner. The 
department also developed, implemented and provided training on a new assessment policy designed 
to better identify and evaluate the needs of USD II students. 

Division of Fiscal Services 

The division is responsible for financial administration, inventory control, motor vehicles, 
engineering, internal and external audits and overall supervision of all fiscal activities for the agency. 
Additionally, it maintains purchasing responsibility for the central office. 

Division of Private Provider Financial Services 

The division is responsible for establishing cost-effective and efficient rates for services provided 
to children, including foster care, residential facilities, group homes, temporary shelters and 
transitional living programs. The division also administers the Child Welfare Accounting System and 
oversees the statewide development and procurement of contractual services. 

Revenue Enhancement Unit 

The Revenue Enhancement Unit attempts to maximize federal reimbursements for agency services 
through the supervision of the Title IV-E eligibility program. Unit staff analyze the placement of 
children to determine eligibility for federal participation in the costs of care. Additionally, the division 
has established a monitoring system to measure the agency's compliance with federal mandates. 



CHILDREN AND YOUTH 197 



Policy Division 

The Policy Division provides public policy analysis and review for the department as well as 
formulating policies and regulations as required by statute or are otherwise needed to assure quality 
services to children and families. The division also acts as a liaison for the department with the 
legislature. 

Division of Licensing and Quality Assurance 

The Division of Quality Assurance holds administrative case reviews, administrative hearings, 
licenses placement resources, conducts evaluations of contracted services, monitors the department' s 
services and investigates allegations of abuse or neglect of children placed in out-of-home care. 

Administrative case reviews, mandated by federal law are intended to determine whether 
individual children living away from their families require continued placement, to assure that the 
placement is appropriate and to establish a time frame for each child's return home or to a permanent 
family home. In the 1991-92 fiscal year, quality assurance staff reviewed 8,240 individual children's 
plans and 2,772 family plans. Administrative hearings are conducted when departmental actions are 
contested and they totaled 308 during the fiscal year. Additionally, 49 requests for hearings were 
denied, withdrawn or resolved during the same period. 

The Program Review and Evaluation Unit monitors and evaluates programs for children that are 
funded or supported by the department and reviews research projects. The unit conducted 68 programs 
evaluations of contracted services. Additionally, the unit assisted in the development of standards for 
day treatment programs, and the research committee reviewed 16 studies and held 13 consultations. 

The Investigations Unit investigates allegations of child abuse in private child care institutions and 
DCYS licensed foster homes. The unit received 90 referrals involving group care and 112 reports 
against foster homes. 

During the 1991-92 fiscal year, the department licensed a total of 475 new family homes including 
298 foster families, 68 adoptive families, and 109 relative homes. The department conducted 1,249 
relicensing reviews, relicensing 984 and closing 265 . Initial licenses were issued to two child placing 
agencies. The department relicensed 58 child care facilities, 3 1 instate child placing agencies, and 10 
permanent family residences. Eighty-two out-of-state child placing agencies were reviewed and 
approved. 

Division of Management Information Systems 

The Division of Management Information Systems supports regional service delivery activities by 
developing data collection and management systems, acquiring and installing computer equipment, 
providing and managing technical systems, preparing and analyzing reports and assessing implications, 
and maintaining the closed record system. The Systems Automation/Development Unit supports the 
department's automation needs via Local Area Network (LAN), micro and mainframe hardware and 
software procurement, maintenance and cost analysis. 

The Information Analysis and Statistics Unit generates programmatic and fiscal reports on all 
agency provided services and most contracted community services. Specialized statistical reports are 
completed for agency managers, the legislature, federal government and community agencies. The 
division also microfilms closed case and agency payroll records, and shreds and oversees the 
destruction of old records in accordance with statutory requirements. 

Personnel Division 

The Personnel Division supports the regional offices, central office and institutions through the 
recruiting and hiring of qualified staff and the administration of payroll and benefits operations, 
worker' s compensation, and employee counseling. The division is also responsible for administrative 
control of agency positions and labor relations. Personnel processed 5,279 personnel transactions, 
including 257 new hires and 235 promotions. 



198 CHILDREN AND YOUTH 




ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT 



Department of Economic Development 

JOSEPH J. McGEE, Commissioner 

Robert Santy, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1979 Statutory authority - 32-lb 

Central office - 865 Brook St., Rocky Hill, Conn. 06067 

Average Number of full-time employees - 70 

Recurring operating expenses - $6,743,135 

Organization structure - Business and Regional Development, Community and 

Business Financing, Tourism, Marketing, Research, Planning and Information 

Systems Management, and Administrative Services 

CLASSIConnecricut 

TbepnieofNewEn^and. 

THE NEW CONNECTICUT 
JOBS ARE OUR FIRST ORDER OF BUSINESS 

The Department of Economic Development provides leadership and services to enhance the 
state's economy and expand opportunities for individual, business and community prosperity, 
promote equity, and improve the quality of life for Connecticut citizens. A number of programs have 
been launched by the department to encourage job growth, including initiatives in areas of small and 
minority and woman owned business assistance, urban revitalization, international trade, business 
development, high technology and tourism promotion. 

In response to the growing needs of business and to ease the credit crunch the Governor and the 
Legislature made a strong commitment by authorizing $110 million in state bonding for the 
Connecticut Development Authority (CDA) to be used for four distinct programs that will leverage 
private lending. In combination with existing CDA funding, they will be able to produce up to $1 
billion to retain and attract businesses in Connecticut. The programs help manufacturers and other 
businesses that cannot get conventional financing because of the credit crunch. 

The Manufacturing Recovery Act makes changes in sales, property, and corporate income tax paid 
by manufacturers. It broadens the types of activities that can be classified as manufacturing, including 
research and development primarily related to the product; and adds exemption for machinery and 
equipment, and production materials . The act phases in tax savings over a five-year period. These two 
bills will help retain and create jobs, develop all of the state's regions, and boost state and local tax 
revenues. 

All programs and services provided by the department have one ultimate purpose— the creation and/ 
or retention of jobs for Connecticut workers as stated in the state's new slogan "The New Connecticut- 
-Jobs Are Our First Order of Business". The agency accomplishes this mission through the key 
activity programs carried out by specific divisions. The agency must plan, foster and create an 
improved economic climate for the state. 

Agency Organization 

Joseph J. McGee is the commissioner of the Department of Economic Development and Robert W. 
Santy is the Deputy Commissioner. Within the department, there are three primary divisions: 

• Business and Regional Development 

• Community and Business Financing 

• Tourism 

Reporting directly to the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner are the following staff support 
units. 

• Research, Planning and Information Systems 

• Management Administrative Services 

• Marketing Services 

Reporting directly to the commissioner are two quasi-public agencies: The Connecticut Develop- 



200 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 201 

ment Authority (CDA) and the Connecticut Innovations, Inc. (CII) both at 865 Brook Street in Rocky 
Hill. CDA is the primary source of low-cost loans for capital business projects important to the 
economy of the state. CII is a government funded agency which provides risk capital and capital loans 
for the development phases of a new product or service undertaken by a Connecticut company. 
Payback to CII is derived from a royalty based on sales. During 1991-92 $10 million was approved 
for 35 working capital loans and risk capital development projects. Royalty payments returned to CII 
from investments since 1973 exceed $7 million ($880,000 from last year). The agency also 
administers the state Small Business Innovation Research grant program and last year awarded 
approximately $220,000 in grants to 11 companies. Additionally, approximately $2.9 million in 
Yankee Ingenuity Initiative Connecticut institutions of higher education for research and instruc- 
tional endeavors in high technology. Many of these grant projects involve private sector partnerships. 
Foreign representatives in Europe and Japan will be helping with contacts regarding sales, 
translation, communications and arranging visits. Additional representatives are being set up in 
Canada, Mexico, Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan. 

Major Business Functions for the Agency 
Business and Regional Development 

The mission of the Business and Regional Development Division is to provide service to business 
in an efficient and professional manner which results in the retention of jobs, the creation of jobs, and 
enhances the competitiveness of companies - all of which contribute to supporting Connecticut's 
economy and quality of life. 

The Regional and State Development Unit has agents serving Connecticut's regional economics 
and representing the state in its efforts to attract and/or retain businesses considering new locations, 
expansion or relocation options. Regional staff focuses on: 

• Working with local development officials, municipalities, chambers of commerce and community 
organizations. 

• Maintaining a network of service providers (state agencies, utilities, banks, business consultants, 
etc.) to support the needs of businesses. 

• Providing easy access to a state network of business support, including job training, transportation, 
financial and specialized industry resources, and contact with regulatory agencies. 

• Coordinating the activities of regional Business Outreach Centers to provide marketing business 
management, financial planning and loan packaging assistance to firms. 

• Maintaining a comprehensive state-wide data base of industrial sites and buildings to assist in real 
estate location decisions. 

The Business Services Unit's functions are: 

• Location services for real estate information on industrial sites and buildings throughout the state. 

• Job training programs, coordinated by the Department of Labor (DOL) and provided by state 
community and technical colleges. 

• Connecticut Manufacturing Program for Energy Technology (COMPETE) to help companies 
reduce energy costs and obtain special rates. 

• Direct intervention with banks, credit institutions, and federal agencies on behalf of business 
experiencing financial problems. 

• Access to network of state agencies for fast-tracking projects and regulatory assistance. 

• Defense information and services network to help small-and medium-sized companies diversify. 

• Coordination with state Business Outreach Centers which provide customized financial and 
business support service to small- and medium-sized firms. 

• Contract procurement for small, minority- and women-owned firms through the state's Set- Aside 
Program. 

• The International Unit's functions are matched trade leads to Connecticut businesses, trade shows 
for small- and medium-sized firms, and reverse investment activities. 

Community and Business Finance Division 

The mission of the Community and Business Finance Division is to encourage investment by 
economic base industries to increase employment and enhance the municipal tax base through: (a) the 
development of industrial parks and supporting infrastructure; (b) the packaging and utilization of 
state and other financial assistance programs, and (c) the promotion of financial assistance for 
economic development projects (principally economic-based) in the state's urban centers. 



202 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

The primary functions of the division are as follows: 

• Financial assistance for target companies through the Manufacturing Assistance Act and the 
Defense Diversification program. 

• Coordination of public and private sources of equity and debt to maximize available capital for 
clients. 

• Inducement of job creation and capital investment by using property and corporate tax credits and 
job incentive grants. 

• Execution of state capital and financial assistance through grants, direct loans, loan guarantees, 
and lines of credit. 

• Job protection assistance to troubled companies through financial packaging and counselling. 

• Planning and development of industrial parks. 

• Infrastructure development — roads, sanitary sewers, utilities — in support of industrial site 
locations. 

• Planning and development of "Mini Parks" in urban centers to retain and expand companies at 
critical locations. 

• Development of incubator facilities, such as Science Park in New Haven. 

• Use grant funds targeted at urban centers to properly conserve and develop these areas. 

• Acts as management and fiscal control center for more than 200 Special Act, General Fund, Inner 
City, Historic Asset, and Water Grants with a total value of nearly $200 million. 

Tourism Division 

The mission of the Tourism Division is to plan and conduct a program of information and publicity 
designed to attract tourists, visitors and other interested persons from outside the state to this state. 
In addition, their focus is to encourage and coordinate the efforts of other public and private 
organizations or groups of citizens to publicize the facilities and attractions of the state for the same 
purposes. 

Research, Planning and Information Systems Unit 

The mission of the Research, Planning and Information Systems Unit is threefold: (1) to provide 
the economic analysis and research support which is critical to effective economic development, (2) 
to provide the support and guidelines necessary to develop effective state-wide and regional economic 
development plans, and (3) to support agency information systems activities. 

The Research Unit works with Economic Analysis, Economic Information Systems, Research for 
Department Divisions, Interagency Research Initiatives, and Public Information. 

The Planning Unit covers Strategic Planning, Economic Development Cabinet, Regional Economic 
Development, and Policy Research and Analysis. 

The Information Systems Unit provides and maintains the information infrastructure to support the 
agency's administrative, programmatic and economic data needs. 

Affirmative Action 

The department administers a variety of programs aimed at bolstering economic opportunities for 
women and minorities. Minority participation is required of all development agencies working for 
municipalities that are participating in state and local industrial park projects. 




HEALTH SERVICES 



Department of Health Services 

SUSAN S. ADDISS, Commissioner 
Yvette Melendez Thiesfield, Deputy Commissioner 

Delores A. Franks, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1878 Statutory authority - Chap. 333 

Central office - 150 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full- time employees - 834 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - federal $53,296,481 

state $43,893,512 

Capital outlay - $127,479 

Organization structure - Bureau of Health System Regulation, Bureau of Health 

Promotion, Bureau of Community Health, Bureau of Laboratories, Office of Local 

Health Administration, Office of Emergency Medical Services, and Commission on 

Hospitals & Health Care (staff) 




The Department of Health Services is charged with protecting the.public health. The department 
works actively to prevent disease and illness through programs such as prenatal care, 
immunizations, AIDS education, nutrition supplements and hypertension screening. The department 
monitors infectious diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards and regulates health 
care providers such as hospitals, emergency medical services and nursing homes. The state laboratory 
provides testing and monitoring support. The department also collects and analyzes health data to help 
plan policy for the future. The department is the repository for all birth, marriage and death 
certificates. 

The department's $1 03 .7 million budget represents only 1 .2 percent of the entire state budget, $54.5 
million of the department's budget will go back to communities and local public health districts for 
community health programs. The department will generate over $15 million in revenue, a return of 
more than one dollar for every three state dollars expended. Seventy-two percent of the department's 
budget goes for community health, health promotion, chronic disease prevention and laboratory 
services; 16 percent to licensing and regulation; 5 percent to health surveillance and vital records 
functions; and percent for management services. 

Affirmative Action 

The annual affirmative action plan was approved by the Commission on Human Rights and 
Opportunities. During the 1991-92 plan year, the department hired 22 full-time employees. Female 
and minority hires accounted for 63.6 percent and 40.9 percent respectively. There were 38 
promotions, of which 73.7 percent were females and 26.3 percent were minorities. Of the total full- 
time administrators, 40.4 percent are females and 13.5 percent are minority group members. 

Government Relations 

Government Relations directs the department's legislative program and acts as a liaison with the 
General Assembly, congressional delegation and others concerned with public health issues. 

The department received 333 requests from legislators for information and/or assistance. During 
the 1992 General Assembly sessions, the office reviewed 1 ,449 bills (516 Senate bills and 933 House 
bills) and tracked and monitored 74 bills for possible impact on the department's programs, including 
the department's legislative package of seven bills. 

Public Act 92-1 19, An Act Concerning HIV Testing and Treatment of Minors was passed, this act 
allows a minor to be tested for HIV without parental consent. It also allows a physician to examine 
and provide treatment for HIV/ AIDS to a minor only with parental consent unless a physician 

204 



HEALTH SERVICES 205 



determines that (A) parental notification will result in treatment being denied or (B) the minor will 
not seek, pursue or continue treatment if a parent or guardian is notified; and (C) the minor requests 
that there be no parental notification. The act also expands the counseling provisions of the AIDS 
testing and confidentiality law. 

Other legislation actively supported included Public Act 92-1 85, An Act Concerning the Purchase 
and Sale of Hypodermic Needles, which permits the purchase of 10 hypodermic needles and syringes 
without a prescription; Public Act 92-192, An Act Expanding the Lead Poisoning Prevention 
Program, which (1) lowers the level of lead in the blood that must be reported to the Department of 
Health Services and local health departments by institution's and each private clinical laboratory from 
25 to 10 micrograms per deciliter, (2) specifies that a local health director must conduct an 
epidemiological investigation upon receiving a report of a blood level greater than 20 micrograms per 
deciliter of blood; and (3) establishes a lead poisoning prevention task force; and Public Act 92-66, 
An Act Concerning Improved Sales Accountability for All Points of Sale of Tobacco Products, which 
limits the access of cigarette vending machines by minors. 

Communications 

The communications staff is responsible for direction and coordination of media relations and 
support services as well as initiation and coordination of special events and public relations activities. 
The staff distributed 173,331 pieces of literature focusing on general health, regulations, maternal and 
child health and AIDS information. Twenty-four news releases were distributed. The staff developed 
and produced more than 13 educational pamphlets and brochures to support department programs. 
The film library of over 700 titles from the Office of Safety Education was merged with the 
department's existing film library. The library shipped 960 films which were shown 1 192 times to 
20,407 people. 

Administrative Services 

Administrative Services is mandated to assure that the department's financial and administrative 
activities are carried out in an acceptable manner. Administrative Services has direct responsibility 
for the Business Office, Contracts Administration/Audit, Personnel and Payroll. 

The Business Office activities included budget preparation, monitoring of state and federal grant 
expenditures, purchasing, stockroom and inventory services, revenue accounting and accounts 
payable. The FY 92 general fund appropriation was $44,020,991, and the total of federal grant funds 
was $53,296,481. The department-operated programs generated approximately $13,975,890 in 
revenue. 

The Contracts Administration Office oversaw the accountable administration of 277 contracts with 
total funding of $25,368,973. All invoices are approved prior to payment and independent audits of 
each contractor are reviewed. New procedures were implemented to assure the completion of 
contracts in a timely manner. 

The Personnel Office provided a comprehensive personnel management program for over 900 
employees. It administered the Voluntary Leave and Schedule Reduction Program and assisted 
employees with their participation in the early retirement incentive initiative, enabling reduction in 
salary expenditures. 

Data Processing Section 

Data Processing continued to upgrade and improve existing data-handling systems. Office 
automation was expanded further via existing minicomputers, additional personal computers, as well 
as telecommunications networks linking internal computers to each other and to external resources. 

The Women's, Infants ' and Children (WIC) System installed one personal computer at each of the 
21 local sites. Further US DA supported systems development will be based on the Massachusetts 
model of PC based Local Area Networks (LAN). The 10-year-old laboratory system was replaced 
with a turnkey "GEMINI 2000" data system. This IBM AIX based system provides all specimen 
tracking, results reporting, and billing facilities for the entire laboratory. A new PC -based data 
collection and reporting systems for all Healthy Start participants was implemented effective January 
1992. New hardware and systems software were recently received for the Tumor Registry Data 
System. Planning continues to be a high priority within the computer environment. Work has begun 
with the Office of Information and Technology to create strategic and tactical plans to support the 
agency's move to permanent quarters in the near future. 



206 HEALTH SERVICES 



Health Policy Development 

This unit facilitates and coordinates health policy development within the department. It partici- 
pates in several key state task forces and commissions that focus on major health policy areas, such 
as AIDS health care services, health care access, and maternal and child health care. Health Policy 
Development also works with other agencies on special projects such as statewide cancer studies, long 
term care data analysis, and a statewide health data system. 

Health Surveillance and Planning 

Health Surveillance and Planning collects and analyzes statewide mortality, morbidity and vital 
statistics data derived from three major database systems: Vital Records, the Tumor Registry and the 
Longitudinal Nursing Home Patient Registry. The section provides technical planning and policy 
analysis for use by state and local public health programs. It also provides technical and analytic 
support to the Connecticut Partnership for Long Term Care demonstration project. During the fiscal 
year, the section responded to 1,150 requests for information concerning population estimates, vital 
statistics, and long term care data. 

The Connecticut Tumor Registry 

This population-based registry, the oldest of its kind in the U.S., continued to maintain a system 
of cancer surveillance and follow-up, covering all Connecticut residents, to develop data to help 
reduce the incidence of cancer. The registry has conducted epidemiological studies related to the risk 
factors of cancer, treatment, survival, trend analyses, occupational associations, etc. The Tumor 
Registry is a contractual member of the National Cancer Institute's SEER Program, a network of 10 
population-based cancer registries in various areas of the U.S. which monitors cancer incidence in 
over 20 million people. Preliminary data for 1990 revealed 17,399 new malignant and in-site tumors 
diagnosed in Connecticut residents. Of these, 7,971 were males and 9,428 females. The age-adjusted 
incidence rate per 100,000 population for both sexes combined increased to 429.9 in 1990; for males 
it increased to 463.6 between 1989 and 1990; and for females it increased to 422.7. There are over 
516,000 cancer cases on file since 1935. 

There were 108 requests for cancer information from the registry during the year. The registry also 
participated in eight special cancer studies in cooperation with Yale University, the National Cancer 
Institute (NCI) and other researchers. Four research articles were published in various journals based 
on data from the registry. Data on almost 250,000 tumors were submitted to NCI in December 1991 
to be used for the analysis of cancer incidence and survival in Connecticut and comparisons with other 
areas of the country. 

Vital Records 

Vital Records is the sole source of Connecticut vital statistics which drive federal grants for 
maternal and infant health and other preventive programs. Statistics derived from this section form 
the basis for program planning and health policy development in Connecticut. The section has 
linkages with local town clerks, and networks with hospitals, medical examiners and probate courts. 

The section received and recorded a total of 1 17,475 certificates of vital events during this fiscal 
year: 49,821 births, 28352 deaths, 24,549 marriages, 12,255 dissolution of marriage reports, and 
2,500 birth and deaths to Connecticut residents out-of-state. During this year 22,146 requests for 
certified copies of vital records were processed, generating revenue of $1 10,730. During the third year 
of birth record registration via the Automated Vital Statistics System (AVSS), three additional 
hospitals were added, raising the total to 15 participating hospitals. Currently, 69.4 percent of 
Connecticut birth records are transferred electronically to Vital Records through this system. 

The quality assurance program continues to provide liaison with and feedback to hospital staff 
regarding birth certificate preparation. The Vital Records Section has instituted a series of seminars 
for multidisciplinary hospital staffs on improving birth certificate information and the importance of 
accurate natality data. This section has also provided in-service programs for probate court judges and 
clerks, for the perinatal resources nurses group, and for local registrars of vital statistics. A technical 
audit of the section was completed this year. 

Office of Local Health Administration 

The office distributed over $2.3 million in state grants-in-aid to 39 full-time health departments and 
health districts to underwrite the cost of local health public health services in 90 cities and towns in 
the state. The office likewise distributed over $158,000 in state grants-in-aid to 27 towns with 
populations under 5,000 to underwrite the cost of public health nursing services in those communities. 



HEALTH SERVICES 207 



Office staff handled over 200 inquiries from or about local health departments. Appeals to the 
commissioner of 35 orders issued by local directors of health were received and processed. The 
directory of local directors of health was updated its statewide distribution enlarged. Appointments 
of 20 new local health directors were reviewed and approved and orientation provided. Due to early 
retirements and other factors, the turnover of local directors of health increased in FY 1992. Four 
informational workshops were held for local directors and their staff on epidemiology, community 
needs assessment, data analysis, etc. Two meetings of the commissioner with all local directors were 
held. Office staff continued work with the Healthy CT Coalition and other state-level professional 
groups interested in an initiative to mandate full-time local health services in the state by mid-decade. 
A proposal for Local Health Services in Connecticut in the 1990's was developed and will be moved 
forward as a legislative initiative next year. The office completed two major projects - the 
establishment of a rapid electronic communication system with all local health officers in the state and 
the establishment of a computerized data base on local health services in the state. 

Bureau of Community Health 
Maternal and Infant Health Division 

Comprehensive and preventive prenatal and children's health care services were expanded to 
reduce infant mortality, morbidity and low birthweight babies. The division and the Department of 
Income Maintenance (DIM) together served 7,350 pregnant women and 7,160 infants and children. 
A capacity survey was conducted to determine the availability of client slots in visiting nurse 
associations, community health centers, local health departments, and hospitals in an effort to support 
Connecticut's "Baby Your Baby" Campaign. A statewide, toll-free, healthline was established to 
refer women and children to available health services through a grant program to Infoline. Eight 
hospitals were funded to reduce infant mortality and neonatal care costs by providing comprehensive 
services to pregnant women and children through the Commission on Hospitals and Health Care 
initiative. All maternal deaths underwent a clinical review through the maternal mortality program 
to identify more effective clinical management protocols. Eight cities with disproportionate rates of 
infant mortality and morbidity were funded through the Infant Mortality Action Plans program to 
organize local community action plans to mobilize their resources. Over 110 MCH organizations/ 
agencies participated in the Healthy Mothers/Healthy Babies Coalition to increase information 
sharing and collaboration among services. 

The division also administered funds to Planned Parenthood of CT, Inc. and other licensed 
freestanding family planning clinics. The Family Planning program provided 29,240 reproductive 
health visits, over 7,000 free pregnancy tests to poor women and the distribution of over 280,000 free 
condoms. 

The WIC program provided supplemental foods and nutrition education to pregnant, postpartum 
and breastfeeding women, infants and young children from families with inadequate income whose 
physical and mental health are at risk due to poor nutrition. The program administered a U.S. Dept. 
of Agriculture grant of $33,195,288 to serve over 62,000 Connecticut participants. In addition to 
regulatory activities, the WIC program continued to work on anew automated data processing system. 

The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) program provided counseling and referral services to 
42 families and their significant others who were coping with death of a child. Connecticut Sexual 
Assault Crisis Services (CONNS ACS), a program funded to provide services for rape crisis victims, 
served approximately 6,363 victims and families; another 60,000 received educational presentations. 

The division received a $226,262 grant from the federal office of Substance Abuse Prevention to 
fund a demonstration project for low-income substance-abusing pregnant women. 

The Newborn Screening program tests every infant born in Connecticut for PKU, Galactosemia, 
Congenital Hypothyroidism and Sickle Cell Disease, and provides tracking and treatment. Tracking 
was done on 217 infants who had abnormal tests results for PKU, Galactosemia and Hypothyroidism; 
204 were found to be normal, and 13 infants were treated. Nineteen infants were tracked and treated 
for Sickle Cell Disease. Health care providers and parents received letters on 827 infants who had 
Sickle Cell Trait. Legislation was passed to include testing, tracking and treatment for Maple Syrup 
Disease, Bio tinidase and Homocystinuria. Thematernal PKU program provided counseling, nutrition 
guidance, and follow-up to 45 women of child-bearing age to prevent mental retardation in their 
offspring. Genetic services and counseling was provided to 250 clients through the clinical Genetics 
program. Over 4,000 calls were handled by the Pregnancy Exposure Riskline. 

Financial support is provided to community health centers and other specialty clinics to provide 
comprehensive primary care services to socio-economically deprived and medically underserved 
populations. The Primary Care Community Health Center programs served 1 17,264 uninsured and 



208 HEALTH SERVICES 



underinsured adults and children. 

The division coordinates the intrastate efforts as the lead for the Cooperative Agreement for 
Primary Care. This federally funded planning and assistance program focuses on recruitment of 
Primary Care providers and Connecticut state loan repayment and planning for primary services in 
underserved areas. 

Child & Adolescent Health Division 

The Children with Special Health Care Needs program served 700 children with case management 
and related services from a core staff of state consultants while 2,000 received similar services through 
contracted arrangements. This program is designed to promote and provide early identification, 
intervention and rehabilitative services for children who are vulnerable or affected by handicapping 
and/or chronic conditions and whose families are medically indigent. 

The Community Child Health Services Program funded and provided oversight to three Primary 
Care Clinics, and licensed 101 Well Child Clinics. These clinics provided preventive and primary care 
services to 21,549 infants and children from birth through 18 years of age. Staff also provided 
consultation and technical assistance to clinic personnel on numerous preventive and medical care 
matters such as immunization, nutrition, child development, etc. Major educational activities 
included a family-focused public education program, "Injury Prevention and Control, " which reached 
an estimated 30,000 target audience; and a two day program, "Current Concepts in Vaccine 
Preventable Diseases 1992: Responding to the Crisis" for 100 health care providers and administra- 
tors who provide service to children under two years of age. 

The School and Adolescent Health Program's 1 1 school-based health centers throughout the state 
served nearly 6,000 students. More than 25,000 visits were recorded. The centers continued to provide 
diagnosis and treatment for illness and injuries, mental health counseling and health promotion and 
educational activities. Substance abuse prevention components continued at eight sites. One addi- 
tional school-based health center should open in the fall of 1992. School health consultation services 
continued with training and technical assistance provided to over 40 school health programs. 
Collaborative work with other state agencies and community groups resulted in improved student 
health and the continuation of a Carnegie Foundation Grant to enhance the education and health of 
middle grade students. The Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention and Young Parents Programs provided 
direct care and case management services to approximately 2,000 teens. Additionally, the programs 
had nearly 11,000 education and information contacts with community -based providers and the 
public. 

The nutrition awareness initiatives included educating over 2,500 adults on "Making Food Choices 
for Better Health." Over 150 health professionals were trained via presentations and conferences in 
working with low literacy and the proposed food labeling regulations. "Fight Cancer in the Kitchen," 
a slide program developed in collaboration with the Aetna was presented to over 350 adults and 
received the rating of "most useful program." Press releases, television and radio interviews continue 
to carry the diet and health message. "Good Food" costume characters were used at hospitals, colleges, 
corporate health fairs, food shows and educational programs. Youth were targeted through the Smart 
Choice Diet Modification project. During this year, five additional school systems' staff were trained 
and the Smart Choice training manual and videos were requested by 105 individuals. More than 350 
adults, educators, and school food service and health professionals were reached via nutrition 
presentations and conferences. Over 80 school systems participated in the first annual "Munch A 
Healthy Lunch" Day, involving 63,583 students and 1,284 adults. As a result of school breakfast 
outreach efforts, 400 more students are eating breakfast in two Hartford schools. 

Nutritionists provided training on pediatric nutrition to 1 10 teachers and nutritionists in collabo- 
ration with six professional nutrition organizations, and to Registered Dietitians working in pediat- 
rics. An interagency interdisciplinary team was trained innutrition for children ages birth to three with 
special health care needs, and Head Start Health and Nutrition Coordinators on nutrition for children 
with special health care needs. Childhood nutrition consultation, technical assistance, and referral 
were provided to numerous other professionals, community groups, and the public. An initiative 
continued to support and assist children with Phenylketonuria (PKU), including facilitation of a PKU 
camp. 

Bureau of Health Promotion 

Environmental Health Services Division 

Environmental Health Section 

The five components of the Section are food protection, lead/housing, recreational health 
and safety, asbestos and radon. A summary of activities follows: 



HEALTH SERVICES 209 



Sttjntttaryof Activate* 



Investigation of food-borne disease, food recalls and food alerts 76 

Evaluation of local food protection programs 17 

Inspections, investigations and notifications of asbestos abatement projects 2,178 
Asbestos management plans compliance inspections in schools 121 

Approval of requests for asbestos alternative work practices 488 

Granting of licenses for youth camps 189 

Inspection of public bathing areas and review of water analyses 1,475 
Requests for service - citizen complaints, agency consultations and technical assistance 14,879 
Plan reviews and approvals - public swimming pools 35 

Requests for radon information packets sent 3,846 



Mosquito and Vector Control Section 

The Section provides salt marsh mosquito control and marsh restoration in 26 coastal 
towns. Technical assistance statewide to the general public and local health departments is provided 
on Lyme Disease prevention and a variety of insect and rodent control topics. 



Highlight!!; of Activities 



Number of hours to complete salt marsh restoration mosquito control 1,815 

Number of inspections of salt marshes for mosquito breeding 301 

Citizen complaints (mosquito and vector) 237 
Number of salt marsh projects completed 11 



On-site Sewage Disposal Section 

The Section is responsible for reviewing plans of sewage disposal systems to prevent groundwater 
pollution and plans with a high degree of technical difficulty. Technical assistance is provided to the 
public and local health departments. The Section also licenses sewage system installers. 



Accomplishments 



Provide technical engineering review of plans, perform site inspections 1,050 

Administer licensing program, quarterly exams, renew installer/cleaner licenses 2,700 

Evaluate local health department sewage disposal programs for compliance 20 



Water Supplies Section (Drinking Water) 

The section ensures a safe and adequate supply of public drinking water by reducing or eliminating 
the threat of bacteriologic and chemical contaminations. Water quality data from each of the 660 
public water supplies that serve 2.7 million people are evaluated to ensure compliance to water quality 
standards. 

Violations of standards, complaints of water quality, quantity and hazardous contamination 
problems were investigated and corrected. Compliance was achieved through inspections, review of 
cross connection control and watershed survey reports. 

Plans and specifications for new and altered drinking water treatment facilities were reviewed and 
approved, 64 water treatment plant operators were certified and technical assistance was provided to 
local health authorities who have jurisdiction over approximately 250,000 private wells in Connecticut. 

The Planning Unit continued to provide technical assistance to water suppliers with their 
preparation of long range water supply plans and support services for the coordinated planning 
process required by Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 25-33g. A statewide program to conserve drinking water 
continued to be implemented. Water supply planning activities are essential to assure existing and 
future drinking water for Connecticut's citizens. A growing concern for a number of public drinking 
water supplies in the state is the ability to meet the demands for additional drinking water and 
community growth. Public education and awareness of drinking water and water conservation were 
a part of this year's "Drinking Water Week," May 4 - 8, 1992. 

Environmental Epidemiology and Occupational Health Division (EEOH) 

This division reduces disease, disability and premature death among Connecticut residents caused 
by exposure to hazardous chemical and radioactive substances. The division is concerned with 
evaluation of potential exposures in the environment and in occupational settings. 



210 HEALTH SERVICES 



Working with various agencies and departments within the state, and in particular with the 
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), EEOH prepared risk assessments for toxic air 
pollutants, soil-contaminated waste sites, drinking water contamination and fish contamination. The 
division completed 42 specific assessments of various contaminated media. It also responded to over 
7,000 phone inquiries from the public and other agencies on all types of toxic exposures. EEOH 
produced seven fact sheets on toxic chemicals or hazardous waste sites for use by the public and local 
health departments, and was directly involved in evaluating the risks of siting or permitting new 
facilities such as incinerators and a low level radioactive waste site. EEOH continued work under two 
federal grants to conduct studies on the public health significance of Superfund hazardous waste sites 
in Connecticut and to educate physicians about risks from those sites. Two scientific papers were 
accepted for publication, and nine professional presentations were made at national and regional 
meetings. EEOH staff participate on a number of state and regional workgroups/task forces such as: 
the Connecticut Siting Council and the Hazardous Waste Management Service. 

EEOH continued to develop its capacity to monitor occupational disease, such as adult lead 
poisoning, with over 1,200 occupational diseases reported. The "Occupational Health Clinics Bill" 
provided money to EEOH to help set up a state program for occupational disease surveillance that was 
enhanced with a grant from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
EEOH continued its research into lead exposure in bridge reconstruction workers under a five-year 
grant obtained by Yale University. Under a Memoranda of Agreement, EEOH receives medical and 
industrial hygiene support from the University of Connecticut Medical School-Occupational Health 
Clinic in order to assist in evaluation of work sites. 

EEOH has expanded its program in childhood lead poisoning prevention and has designed a 
surveillance system for lead poisoning. A Centers for Disease Control (CDC) grant allows EEOH to 
provide money to Bridgeport and Stamford to expand lead screening, intervention, and education. 
EEOH provided block grant money to 15 towns for expanded lead programs. Redrafted lead 
abatement regulations will assure safe procedures during lead paint removal, when adopted. The 
division recorded 3,433 cases of childhood lead poisoning and worked with local departments to 
remove sources. 

The division coordinated a major portion of the department's response in the two nuclear accident 
drills held this year. EEOH also conducted research on other radiologic health issues such as electric 
and magnetic fields (EMF), x-rays, and radioisotopes in ground water. Under a legislative mandate, 
EEOH set up a task force to study the potential risks of EMF and organized a report on EMF prepared 
by the Connecticut Academy of Sciences. EEOH continued to provide technical support to the state's 
radon program and advised the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Service and the low level radioactive 
waste siting process. 

Infectious Disease Epidemiology Division 
Epidemiology Section 

The Epidemiology Section reduces the occurrence of preventable infectious diseases. During the 
year, 20,657 cases of communicable diseases were reported and evaluated. Notable trends included 
increases in rabies (530 cases, 29-fold increase), Lyme disease (1,083 cases, 33 percent increase), and 
chlamydia (7,840 cases, 5 percent increase), but encouraging decreases in measles (10 cases, 81 
percent decrease), bacterial meningitis due to Hemophilus influenza (1 1 cases, 65 percent decrease), 
newly acquired syphilis (1,033 cases, 17 percent decrease) and gonorrhea (6,607 cases, 4 percent 
decrease). In addition, 264 outbreaks of illness (38 community, 226 in-hospital/nursing home) were 
investigated. A total of 617,857 doses of publicly supplied vaccine were purchased for distribution 
to health care providers in the state. Immunization surveys were performed on day care enrollees, 
school enterers and samples of two year old children statewide and in urban areas. Immunization 
levels of two year olds in urban areas were again found to be 15-20 percent lower than in children 
elsewhere in the state. During the budget period the department endorsed new national recommen- 
dations for universal vaccination of infants against hepatitis B and began to distribute additional 
vaccine to meet the resulting need. 

The Pulmonary Disease Program continued to intensify control activities in response to the threats 
of HIV-related and drug-resistant tuberculosis. TB-HIV coinfection was made reportable in August, 
1 99 1 . Thirty-seven cases of coinfection were reported, of whom 32 percent were placed on supervised 
therapy. Overall, 1,362 persons were started on preventive therapy. Encouraging decreases in 
tuberculosis were seen statewide (25 percent) and in high AIDS incidence urban areas (8 percent). 

The epidemic of rabies in raccoons which entered the state in March 1991 is expected to spread 
across the state in the next year. The number of affected towns increased from 6 to 39 during FY '92. 
In response, staff issued press releases, developed a curriculum for school children, held seminars for 



HEALTH SERVICES 2 1 1 



local health departments, mailed information to physicians, participated in a statewide advisory 
group, and provide 24-hour- a-day consultation. 

Although syphilis incidence dropped for the second straight year, incidence was still four fold 
higher than before the increase. Of the 1,033 cases of early syphilis reported in 1991, 939 were 
provided sexual partner outreach resulting in 1 ,074 persons being referred for medical assessment and 
treatment. The HIV partner outreach program expanded: 59 referrals, a 100 percent increase, resulted 
in 65 potentially exposed partners receiving HTV counseling and testing. 

Infectious Disease Division 
AIDS Section 

The ADDS Section manages a budget of $9 million in state and federal funds for the purpose of 
monitoring the number of AIDS cases, coordinating studies to determine the extent of HIV infection 
in various populations, carrying out AIDS education programs, providing HIV counseling and 
testing, and funding health and so 



3MI>1992 Data 



502 New cases of AIDS reported 

20,000 People received HIV counseling and testing services 

13,000 Outreach contacts made with drug users 

35 New counselors and 80 new educators trained 



cial services for people with AIDS 
and HTV infection. These programs 
are carried out to more than 40 local 
agencies and organizations funded 
by the AIDS Section. In addition, 
the AIDS Section provides training 
for educators and counselors in funded and non-funded agencies. 

The AIDS Section works closely with the Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission 
(CADAC) and with the Department of Correction (DOC). CAD AC manages AIDS funds to provide 
counseling and testing for people in substance abuse programs. The Department of Correction 
provides counseling and testing services for inmates, many of whom are at high risk for HTV infection. 

During FY 92, new federal funds were provided to five HIV care consortia around the state. These 
consortia provide case management, medical care, and social services for people with AIDS and HIV 
infection. This federal grant program, managed by the AIDS Section, also funds the AIDS Drug 
Assistance Program in the DIM. 

Chronic Disease Division 

The division focuses on reducing death and disability from chronic diseases through the identifi- 
cation of modifiable risk factors that contribute to the early onset of cancer, heart disease, stroke, 
diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cirrhosis of the liver and preventable injuries. 
Division goals are addressed through the following programs: 1) professional education and training 
including but not limited to nurses, physicians, allied health professionals, health educators, exercise 
technicians, nutritionists and dietitians; 2) public education programs geared towards including 
public awareness regarding risk factors for cardiovascular disease; 3) cancer prevention and early 
detection programs focusing on the promotion of cancer prevention via smoking cessation/preven- 
tion, diet modification and early detection of breast and cervical cancer; 4) Connecticut high blood 
pressure program, via grants to local health departments and other community agencies, serves 
Connecticut's high-risk populations. In 1991-92, hypertension services reached approximately 
13,000 state residents; 5) chronic disease prevention and control program, health education/risk 
reduction program. Twenty-four grants were awarded to local health departments and other community 
agencies to provide chronic disease prevention and early detection programs for at-risk populations 
reaching more than 26,000 residents. In addition, division staff provided over 1,200 consultations to 
health agencies, schools, and businesses and industries which resulted in the implementation of more 
than 870 risk-reduction activities statewide; 6) behavioral risk factor surveillance. A random-digit 
dial telephone survey of 150 adult residents is conducted monthly. In addition, a computerized health 
risk appraisal identifying risk-taking behavior for youth was implemented in 24 schools with 3,291 
students in grades 4-12 participating. 

Bureau of Laboratories 

Services available through this bureau support the needs of all communities in the state by analysis 
of specimens and samples for a variety of state agencies, local health departments, hospitals, 
physicians and law enforcement groups. Tests performed by independent clinical and environmental 
laboratories for citizens in this state are monitored for quality through periodic inspection and 
improved through consultation and training provided by the bureau. 



212 



HEALTH SERVICES 



laboratory Tests Performed 




Number of 


Number of 


Laboratory 


Specimens 


Examinations 


Biochemistry 


238,505 


287,796 


Sanitary and dairy chemistry 


12,279 


88,070 


Environmental chemistry 


13,538 


29,187 


Organic chemistry 


4,078 


34,983 


Residue 


940 


27,411 


Virology 


100,943 


189,447 


Toxicology 


70,593 


94,707 


General microbiology 


27,403 


36,802 


Enteric diseases 


3,158 


13,766 


Tuberculosis and mycology 


7,490 


31,870 


Serology and immunology 


24,607 


66,391 


Food/environmental microbiology 


17,645 

521 ;m 


30,500 

930,930 



Toxicology 

The Toxicology Laboratory has the responsibility of analyzing evidence submitted by local and 
state police. These cases may concern rape, drug abuse, driving while under the influence of alcohol 
and/or drugs, arson and consumer protection. In the past year there were 6,136 cases reported. This 
represents a significant decrease (38 percent). However, 71,997 samples were analyzed and 51,359 
examinations performed. This represents a 6.5 percent and 12.8 percent increase respectively over the 
previous year. 

The decrease in cases reported is in large part due to the retirement of one of the toxicologists which 
represents 30 percent of the toxicologists who have to review and sign out the cases. The increase in 
samples analyzed indicates the effectiveness of the automated procedures instituted to provide more 
efficient and cost saving procedures. 

In addition, the two other toxicologists have been spending a larger amount of time testifying as 
expert witnesses, thereby decreasing the time that can be used to review and sign out cases. There has 
also been a noted decrease in the number of cases received since January 1992. This may be a result 
of decrease in drug arrests across the state. 

There has been a drastic increase in the personnel resources needed to train the officers in the 
operation of the new intoximeters as well as the time necessary to certify the instruments for use by 
the police departments. 

Biological Sciences Division 

The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe test was implemented for chlamydial infections and 
gonorrhea. The test is more sensitive than culture and accounted for 41 percent of the 24,264 tests for 
Chlamydia and gonorrhea. The laboratory began distribution of a new transport medium that allows 
culture of all enteric bacterial pathogens from one specimen rather than two. Salmonella enteritidis 
accounted for 22 percent of the 1,388 Salmonella strains isolated or referred to the laboratory. Isolates 
of S^ heidelberg accounted for another 19.4 percent, most of which were associated with a single 
outbreak at the Norwalk Oyster Festival. Specimens submitted in FY 1991-92 for tests for mycobac- 
teria and fungi increased by 3.7 percent over FY 1990-91. Mycobacterium avium accounted for 61 
percent of 725 clinically significant mycobacterial strains isolated or referred to the Tuberculosis/ 
Mycology Laboratory reflecting its importance in infections in autoimmune deficiency syndrome 
(AIDS) patients. The laboratory received a grant of $13,000 from the Centers for Disease Control 
(CDC) for equipment and supplies to assist in the prevention and control of multidrug -resistant 
tuberculosis. For the first time since 1984, paralytic shellfish poisoning was detected in shellfish 
samples from the Connecticut coast; the two areas involved were closed to shellfishing. The number 
of animals tested for rabies in FY 1991-92 increased almost threefold over FY 1990-91, from 892 to 
2,61 1; 532 animals were positive for rabies virus, including 485 raccoons, 5 bats, 6 cats, 1 dog, 1 fox, 
2 sheep, 28 skunks and 4 woodchucks. Testing will continue to increase as the epizootic moves across 
Connecticut. Tests for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increased for the fifth consecutive year. 
Of 19,803 specimens tested in FY 1991-92, 3.2 percent were confirmed positive for antibody to HIV. 



Clinical Laboratory Services 

The Clinical Laboratory Services (CLS) Section utilized cross trained personnel and additional 
clerical assistance to eliminate a 6,500 sample backlog created by a 27 percent increase in blood lead 



HEALTH SERVICES 213 



screening. There were 87,555 analyses performed on 70,95 1 blood samples for the determination of 
lead content during FY 1991-92, a 37 percent increase over the number of samples in FY 1990-91 . 
The FY 1991-92 newborn screening program remained relatively stable with 171,052 examinations 
being conducted on 146,875 samples. This will remain somewhat stable during FY 1992-93, 
however, significant increases (117 percent) are expected in the FY 1993-94 number of examinations 
due to the additional tests [biotinidase, maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), homocystinuria, 
hypothyroidism and sickle cell disease] mandated this year by the Connecticut legislature. The results 
of FY 1991-92 examinations revealed 8 significant (abnormal) reports for phenylketonuria (PKU), 
none for galactosemia, 1 for hypothyroidism and 846 for hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia. From 
the 859 tests performed forTay-Sachs disease, 1 1 were found to be positive. CLS personnel responded 
to 104 proficiency examinations with 98.07 percent accuracy. 

Laboratory Standards Division 

This division's examiners performed more than 380 inspections and required approximately 
38,000 analyses to be made in order to ascertain the quality of performance. 

In addition, the Laboratory Standards Division received a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 
Contract Award that will allow this division to investigate laboratory tests in Physician Office 
Laboratories (POL). The amount of the contract is $94,000. To date, examiners have performed on- 
site inspections of 80 POL which completes the study. The investigation was designed to determine 
if laboratory tests produce inaccurate results. These findings will be correlated with qualification 
levels of office personnel and the level of compliance with quality assurance standards used by 
Medicare and state approved laboratories. This study will provide hard evidence of actual perfor- 
mance of laboratory tests in POL. Laboratory Standards is in the process of interpreting the collected 
laboratory data and when this has been accomplished, an assessment on the quality of work and 
medical devices can be obtained. 

Environmental Chemistry Division 

The Environmental Chemistry Division and the Organic Chemistry Division were combined into 
one division as a result of budget layoffs and retirements. 

There were 32,341 samples analyzed for 208,580 inorganic and organic contaminants. Most of 
these samples were submitted by other state agencies and local health departments from Connecticut 
air, rivers, lakes, drinking waters, waste waters, landfill areas, industrial waste, toxic spills, fish/ 
shellfish, dairy /consumer products, soils and paint. The ability to analyze drinking waters for various 
organics and inorganics for the Phase II and Phase V federal regulations (effective within the next six 
months) have been evaluated and added with detection limits to our programs. 

Six thousand public drinking water samples were monitored for inorganics especially metals as 
required by state and federal regulations. Environmental lead problems resulted in testing 7,600 
samples of paint, soil, dust wipes, air, school drinking fountains, potable water and non-potable water 
for lead content. Of these samples, local health departments submitted 74 percent or 5,600 samples 
to support their childhood lead investigations. The results were used to determine the source of lead 
exposure and ultimately eliminate the body burden to children. The DEP has submitted about 300 
summer survey samples from Connecticut water ways for toxic metals and inorganic compounds in 
an effort to monitor and improve the environment. 

Eight hundred samples of insulation material were submitted from local schools and public 
buildings for asbestos content. At least 1,000 samples of well water were analyzed for radon as part 
of the federal radon mitigation grant. There was a 130 percent increase in the radiochemistry section 
due to the radon and additional Safe Drinking Water requirements for uranium and radium 
concentrations in public waters. 

More than 1,000 environmental samples, including milk, were collected from around Connecticut 
nuclear power plants for evidence of radioactivity. Connecticut's air is also monitored for radioac- 
tivity as part of the state and federal radiation alert monitoring network (ERAM). This sampling 
station continuously monitors the atmosphere for evidence of nuclear power plant or weapons testing. 

The organics laboratories analyzed 6,500 samples for more than 91,000 individual organic 
compounds received from local health directors and other state agencies (especially DEP). Most 
requests are from local health directors for identification of organic compounds in drinking water as 
required by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). All organic contaminants are confirmed 
by sophisticated mass spectrometer analysis using a computerized library for position identification. 
Pesticide and herbicide analysis was done on 735 drinking water samples. DEP continues to monitor 
Connecticut waters for evidence of PCB in soil, fish and shellfish. 

A separate quality control, quality assurance section monitors the precision and accuracy of all 



214 HEALTH SERVICES 



results within this division. These laboratories are also certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the National Institute of Science and Technology, the 
Center for Communicable Diseases, the American Industrial Hygiene Association and the Food and 
Drug Administration to assure the quality of the data. All proficiency sample results were within the 
99 percent confidence limits. 

Bureau of Health Systems Regulations 

The majority of activities within the Department of Health Services which involve the regulation 
of health care delivery are consolidated into the Bureau of Health Systems Regulation. This provides 
one focus within the department for the protection of the public health by ensuring competent and 
capable health care providers. Across the bureau, this is generally ensured by regulating access to the 
health professions and facilities which provide health care and child day care. Persons seeking to 
provide services to the public must demonstrate that they have the requisite education, training, and 
resources to perform adequately. In addition, the bureau may investigate complaints against those 
alleged incompetent or in violation of the law. 

The bureau consists of four major components which have responsibility for implementing state 
licensure and federal certification programs. The Division of Medical Quality Assurance has overall 
responsibility for the regulation of health care professionals. The Community Nursing and Home 
Health Division oversees the licensure of facilities providing child day care as well as the licensure 
of infirmaries in non-state educational institutions and the approval of policies for the administration 
of medications in schools. The Hospital and Medical Care Division has responsibility for the 
regulation of health care facilities, including the certification of facilities as being eligible for 
Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements. And the Administrative/Regulations component coordi- 
nates the development of agency regulations. 

Due to the regulatory nature of the bureau, expertise has been developed at several levels to address 
the need to investigate and take disciplinary action against individuals/facilities who either are in 
violation of the law or are providing an unacceptable quality of healthcare. Procedures consistent with 
the Uniform Administrative Procedures Act are utilized to adjudicate these cases. 

As a result of our licensure application and renewal fees, the bureau is the largest revenue generator 
within the department. Approximately $10,000,000 is collected yearly for the General Fund. Senate 
Bills 2018 and 2023, enacted in the 1992 legislative session, will have a sweeping impact upon the 
revenue within the bureau. Senate Bill 2018, An Act Concerning Various Fees, will increase the 
license application and renewal fees for all types of health care providers. Approximately $2,300,000 
in increased revenue for the general fund is anticipated for fiscal year 1992-93. At these revenue 
levels, the Bureau of Health Systems Regulation generates approximately two and one half dollars 
($2.50) of revenue for every one dollar ($1.00) of state money spent to support the programs. 

Senate Bill 2023, An Act Concerning the Expenditures of the Department of Income Maintenance, 
Certain Fees and the Uncompensated Care Pool, redefined the fees collected for licensure purposes. 
The public act redefines license renewal fees to be "Professional Services Fees." By changing the 
name of the fee, the State of Connecticut is better able to obtain reimbursements from the federal 
government for the payments the DIM has made to the citizens of Connecticut for services from these 
professionals. 

Community Nursing Division 

This division implements state laws and regulations governing licensure of community -based 
services, administers selected grants, and provides extensive consultation and technical assistance 
around the development of community-based services. The division licenses child day care centers 
and group day care homes, and infirmaries in educational institutions and approves the policies and 
procedures for administration of medications in schools. In addition, division staff provide consul- 
tation and technical assistance concerning adult day care, which is not regulated at the present time. 

The child day care licensure program is one of the largest facility licensure programs in state 
government. It oversees more than 1 ,500 child day care centers and group day care homes serving over 
80,000 children in the state annually. More than 100 new centers were licensed in the last year. 
Program staff investigated over 250 complaints concerning licensed as well as unlicensed programs. 
This year the staff initiated a newsletter that is sent to day care providers three to four times a year. 

Under the school infirmary licensure program, site inspections were made and licenses were 
granted to infirmaries in 17 private secondary schools, 7 colleges/universities and 1 special school, 
serving a combined student/employee population of over 50,000. There are 169 licensed infirmary 
beds. Approximately 52,000 persons were eligible for care during FY 1991-92 The total number of 
admissions was 3902. 



HEALTH SERVICES 



215 



Policies were reviewed and consul- 
tation provided to local boards of edu- 
cation in 129 school systems and spe- 
cial school districts to allow for the 
administration of medications by 
school personnel in the absence of the 
school nurse. Amended regulations 
became effective March 17, 1992. 

From July 1, 1991 through Febru- 
ary 29, 1992, The Home Health Sec- 
tion was located in this division. The 
Home Health Section was transferred 
to the Hospital Medical Care Division 
in March 1992. 

The Home and Community Based 
HIV Program provides home care ser- 
vices to individuals with the etiologic 
agent for AIDS. Clients must be cer- 
tified as medically or chronically de- 
pendent. The division administers the 
grant which prov ided S 1 57 ,000 to three 
home care agencies in the state: Visit- 
ing Nurse and Home Care, Inc., with 
headquarters in Plainville, Visiting 
Nurse Association of South Central 
Connecticut in New Haven, and Visit- 
ing Nurse and Community Health of 
Eastern Connecticut. These agencies 
have agreed to serve eligible clients 
who may live outside their normal 
service area and have provided a total 
of 537 visits to 103 individuals to date. 

Senate Bill 2018 increases the fees 
collected for child day care centers 
and group day care homes, both for the 
initial application and for the renewal. 
In addition, this legislation will imple- 
ment a fee for the licensure of infirma- 
ries within non-state educational insti- 
tutions. These changes will provide 
approximately $300,000 in increased 
revenues for the general fund in fiscal 
year 1992-93. 



Licensing Data 
Profession 


New 
Licenses 


Renewed 
Licenses 


Advanced Practice Registered 
Nurses 


187 


477 


Audiologists 


16 


159 


Barbers 


44 


2,225 


Chiropractic physicians 


44 


752 


Dental hygienists 


152 


2,848 


Dentists 


112 


2,759 


Embalmers 


23 


763 


Funeral directors 


1 


135 


Hairdressers 


974 


21,798 


Hearing aid dealers 


18 


168 


Homepathic physicians 


1 


30 


Hypertrichologists 


15 


251 


Licenses practical nurses 


201 


10,857 


* Marriage and family therapists 


15 





Mid wives 





1 


Natureopthic physicians 


8 


71 


* Nurse aides 


6,125 





Nurse mid wives 


9 


70 


Nursing home administrators 


70 


735 


Occupational therapists 


79 


288 


Occupational therapy assistants 


24 


69 


Opticians 


21 


502 


Optometrists 


17 


584 


Osteropathic physicians 


22 


128 


Physician assistants 








Physical therapists 


150 


2,490 


Physicians/surgeons 


755 


10,404 


Podiatrists 


33 


360 


Psychologists 


74 


1,235 


Registered nurses 


2,003 


44,403 


* Respiatory care practitioners 


1 





* Social workers 


196 





Speech pathologists 


73 


1,335 


Veterinarians 


73 


728 


* Certification and registration programs with 


no renew aJ 


component 







Medical Quality Assurance Division 

This division has overall responsibility for the licensure and regulation of professionals in 33 health 
care fields. The division received a total of 15,007 applications for licensure, certification or 
registration in the 1991-92 fiscal year. A total of 1 1,623 new licenses, certifications and registrations 
were issued. The division also collaborated with 1 6 boards and commissions in approving educational 
programs and administering examinations in the various regulated professions. A total of 107,334 
individuals renewed their licenses in the fiscal year. A total of $765,246 in licensure/certification 
application revenues and S8, 932, 608 in licensure renewal revenues was collected. 

The division investigates complaints against 
regulated health care providers and, as warranted, 
may take disciplinary action, restrict an 
individual's practice, or revoke their right to 
practice in Connecticut. Complaints against regu- 
lated health care professionals are addressed by 
the Hearings Office. The Hearings Office re- 
ceived a total of 591 new complaints against 



Other Activities 



Accident/incident reports re: nursing 
homes reviewed 
Accident/incidents investigated 

Complaints received and investigated 

Educational programs by staff 



40,498 

6,884 

337 

138 



216 



HEALTH SERVICES 



regulated professionals in fiscal year 199 1 -92. A total of 1 1 5 disciplinary actions were taken as aresult 
of division investigations, including 39 memoranda of decision, 67 consent orders, and 9 licensure 
denials on disciplinary grounds. 

Public Acts 92-6 and 92-1 6 (May Special Session) increased application and renewal fees for many 
professions regulated by the division. It is anticipated that an increase of approximately $1,800,000 
in fiscal year 1992-93 revenues will be realized as aresult. Below is a table summarizing the licensure 
data for professions regulated by the division. 

Hospital and Medical Care Division 

This division inspects, licenses and certifies health care institutions managing a total of 47,135 
patient/client beds across the state. The state licensure programs ensure that patients are receiving 
adequate quality 
healthcare. The certi- 
fication programs vali- 
date the eligibility of 
facilities for participa- 
tion in Medicare and 
Medicaid by certifying 
compliance with the 
program requirements . 
Both programs are 
implemented through 
the use of on-site visits 
to facilities as well as 
the follow-up of com- 
plaints. In addition, fa- 
cilities must report to 
the division any acci- 
dents and prescribed 
incidents as they oc- 
cur. The division re- 
views and/or investi- 
gates these reports, as 
appropriate. A total of 
35 health care facili- 
ties/providers were 
newly licensed and 42 
health care facilities/ 
providers were newly 
certified during the 
1991 fiscal year. State 
licensing activities in- 
cluded, 1,987 on-site 
inspections and the re- 
view of approximately 
40,498 accident re- 
ports filed on behalf of 
long term care recipi- 
ents. 

The division is des- 
ignated as the state sur- 
vey agency under a 
contract with the fed- 
eral Department of Health and Human Services and has a state interagency contract with the DIM. 
Under these contracts, the division administered a federal "program of certification," which in the 
1991-92 fiscal year required the review and evaluation of 1,099 facilities/providers through direct 
observation and evaluation of patient/client care and services. 

The division began significant new federal long term care survey processes associated with the 
Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1 987 and Title XVIQ Medicare certification of mammography 
screening suppliers. Division staff received and investigated 337 complaints regarding health care 



Licenses and Certifteatioris for 
He*lth'CareF»ciliUes 


Licensed 






Certified 


Beds 


Nursing Home Facilities 








Chronic and conv. nursing homes 


226 


221 


23,880 


* 175 dually certified as SNF/ICF 


Rest homes with nursing supervision 


112 


25 


5,804 


Homes for the aged 


122 


N/A 


3,156 


Total 


460 


mm&m 


32,340 


Hospitals 








General hospitals 


35 


35 


10,739 


Children's hospitals 


1 


1 


98 


Chronic disease hospitals 


6 


6 


846 


Short-term hospital, special, hospice 


1 


1 


52 


Psychiatric hospitals 


6 


10 


846 


TotaL 


- : :: ; 49 ■:■;■:; 


53 


i£p» 


Mental Health Facilities 








Substance abuse facilities 


92 


N/A 


1,376 


Family care homes 


18 


N/A 


62 


Intermediate treatment facilities 


2 


N/A 


35 


Mental health residential living centers 


18 


N/A 


169 


Mental health community residential centers 


9 


N/A 


72 


Mental health clinics 


97 


N/A 


N/A 


Mental health day treatment 


9 

Id* 


N/A 


N/A 


Mental Retardation Facilities 






g^**S**S 


Other Facilities 








Outpatient clinics 


106 


N/A 


N/A 


Ambulatory surgical centers 


10 


15 


N/A 


End-stage renal disease facilities 


6 


20 


N/A 


Physical therapy in independent practice 


N/A 


96 


N/A 


Outpatient p.t. - speech pathology survey 


N/A 


23 


N/A 


Providers of portable x-ray services 


N/A 


10 


N/A 


Outpatient rehabilitation facilities 


N/A 


6 


N/A 


Maternity homes 


1 


N/A 


N/A 


Screening mamography 


N/A 


105 


N/A 


Home health care agencies 


55 


95 


N/A 


Coordination, assessment & Monitoring (CAM) 


1 


N/A 


N/A 


Homemaker home health aide agencies 

Total 

Grand Total 


4 

1,057 


N/A 


N/A 

■ i i ■ i . ii iii iii i ii" 
47,135 



HEALTH SERVICES 217 



compliant health care providers. It also investigates complaints and maintains a toll-free hot line for 
medicare recipients of home care. In addition, the division provided 138 educational and consultative 
sessions for health care providers and professionals in an effort to upgrade services to patients/clients 
throughout the state. 

Public Act 96-6, An Act Concerning Various Fees provides for the implementation of an 
application and renewal fee for the licensure of health care facilities. For some facilities the fee is one 
fixed cost while for other facilities the cost will vary depending upon the number of beds involved. 
Until now, there have been no fees associated with the licensure of health care facilities. It is 
anticipated that approximately $3,500,000 will be raised in new revenues by this division in fiscal year 
1992-93. 

Office of Emergency Medical Services 

The Office of Emergency Medical Services (OEMS) serves as the lead agency for the statewide 
development of emergency medical services. OEMS administers the department's emergency 
response duties and maintains a 24-hour point-of -contact system for public health emergencies. The 
office responded to after hours inquiries and emergencies, including storm damaged areas, multi- 
victim accidents and toxic spills. Staff coordinated field resources for sample collections for the 
federally evaluated 3-day Nuclear Ingestion Pathway drill for the Connecticut Yankee Nuclear Power 
Plant. 

OEMS approved 527 training programs resulting in the certification and re -certification of 7, 101 
emergency medical personnel during the fiscal year. Sixty-four percent of the initial EMT courses 
were given in community colleges reflecting a continued increase in institutionalizing basic level 
emergency medical technician courses. A total of 1,704 students attended community college EMT 
courses. 

The office sponsored its 13th annual educational seminar, Connecticut EMS: A System of 
Challenge and Change. The seminar, attended by over 1 ,280 people, culminated EMS Week in March. 
Development of a comprehensive statewide system, including designation of trauma centers, was 
initiated and draft regulations were proposed. 



Commission on Hospitals and Health Care 

STEVEN J. BONGARD, Ph.D., Chairman 

E. Cortright Phillips, Vice Chairman 

Established - 1973 Statutory authority - Chap. 368c 

Average number of full-time employees - 36 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $2,144,902 

Capital outlay - $45,373 




The Commission on Hospitals and Health Care (CHHC) is the regulatory panel charged with 
maintaining high-quality health care for state residents at the lowest possible cost. It is a full- 
time, five-member commission plus staff. The staff of the CHHC is the "certificate of need" (CON) 
authority for granting or denying any additional function or service proposed by a health-care facility 
within its jurisdiction. The CHHC must also authorize, modify, or deny a request from either a 
governmental or non-governmental facility - except HMO or home health-care facility within its 
jurisdiction. 

Any person wanting to acquire or lease imaging equipment with a total cost of $400, 000 must also 
first receive a CON. In 1991 the CHHC reviewed 206 CON applications, 134 approvals, 25 



218 HEALTH SERVICES 



modifications, 21 denials and 26 withdrawals. These projects represented authorizations for $425 
million and denials to $97 million. Another $172 million in projects were withdrawn. 

Under hospital budget procedures for revenue and pricemaster caps, Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 19a- 
167 through 19a-167k, 16 hospitals underwent full detailed budget reviews, 12 had partial reviews 
and 6 received exempt reviews. For FY 1992 the CHHC authorized an average increase of 7.9 percent 
in hospital gross patient revenues, 3.5 percent below hospitals' requested increases. This year the 
commission saved state patients over $140 million in hospital charges. As of January 1, 1992, the 
commission has administered the state's uncompensated care pool which collects the uniform 
uncompensated care assessment from all non-governmental payers and redistributes it to hospitals 
providing a disproportionate amount of uncompensated care. The CHHC also annually sets rates for 
home health care agencies and specialty hospitals. 



Office of the Chief Medical Examiner 

H. WAYNE CARVER, II, M.D., Chief Medical Examiner 

Edward T. M cDonough, M.D., Deputy Chief Medical Examiner 

Established - 1970 Statutory authority - Sees. 19a-400 - 19a-414 

Average number of full-time employees - 56 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $2,836,212 

Capital outlay - $14,000 

• 

The commission on Medicolegal Investigations, created by Public Act 699, supervises the 
operations of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner which is located on the grounds of the 
University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington. In Connecticut, all violent, sudden, 
unexpected and suspicious deaths and those related to disease resulting from employment or which 
constitute a threat to the public health are reported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. 

During the year, 12,333 deaths were reported to the Medical Examiner's office. Of that number, 
2,855 fell within the jurisdiction of the Medical Examiner ' s Office and were investigated by Assistant 
Medical Examiners serving in communities throughout the state. Of the total number of deaths 
reported, 4,975 were cremation investigations. There were 1 ,270 medicolegal autopsies conducted at 
the Farmington facility. Of the autopsies performed at the Chief Medical Examiner's Office, 195 
represented victims of homicide and constituted 100 percent of the homicides occurring statewide 
during the 12-month period. Completed records, including toxicologic analysis were furnished to the 
state's attorneys within an average of four weeks following autopsy. 

Eight pathology residents from the five hospital training programs in Connecticut and twelve 
medical students from the University of Connecticut Health Center spent an elective one-month 
rotation at the Chief Medical Examiner's office. Thirteen pathology assistant students from Quinnipiac 
College spent six-week rotations observing and assisting in the performance of autopsies. 

The Forensic Pathology Course for pathology residents from hospitals throughout the state was 
conducted during 1991-92. Up to 15 residents from the hospital pathology programs participated in 
the course which has been expanded to 32 hours over a two-year period. 

Educational programs were provided to law enforcement personnel at the Connecticut Municipal 
Police Academy and Connecticut State Police Training Academy, to medical students at the 
University of Connecticut Health Center, Yale University School of Medicine and to a wide range of 
professional and community groups across the state. 

The office of the Chief Medical Examiner is committed to equal opportunity and affirmative action 
for all through the achievement of the agency's goals and timetables. The Commission met at the 
Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Farmington on September 20 and November 22, 1991 and 
on January 17, March 20 and May 8, 1992. 

During 1991-92, the following people were members: Francis R. Coughlin, New Canaan; S. Evans 
Downing, professor of pathology and commission chairman, Yale University; Steven B. Duke, Yale 
University; Harry S. Gaucher, Jr., Willim antic; W. Raymond James, Essex; Mark Shipman, Hartford; 
Sheila Taub, professor of law, University of Bridgeport; and Susan S. Addiss, commissioner of the 
state Department of Health Services. 




MENTAL RETARDATION 



Department of Mental Retardation 

TONI RICHARDSON, Commissioner 

Linda Goldfarb, Deputy Commissioner 

Catherine Daly, Deputy Commissioner 

Established -1975 Statutory authority - Chap. 319b through 319c 

Central office - 90 Pitkin St., East Hartford, Conn. 06108 

Average number of full-time employees - 4,987 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $418,37,938 

Capital outlay - $269,4022 




Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Mental Retardation is to join with others to create the 
conditions under which all people with mental retardation experience: 

• Presence and participation in Connecticut town life; 

• Opportunities to develop and exercise competence; 

• Opportunities to make choices in the pursuit of a personal future; 

• Good relationships with family members and friends; respect and dignity. 

Goals 

In keeping with its mission, the department has identified the following planning goals: 

• Increase the availability of a broad array of community living arrangements. 

• Provide a variety of support services to promote good relationships between a person with mental 
retardation and his or her family. 

• Reduce reliance on segregated programs or services and improve the quality of life of people who 
continue to receive those services. 

• Increase the participation of people with mental retardation in Connecticut's labor market. 

• Increase access for people with mental retardation to educational opportunities available to all 
children and adults in Connecticut. 

• Expand opportunities for people with mental retardation to participate in integrated health, social 
and recreational activities. 

• Improve the administration and management systems that support existing and new services. 
Strengthen service consistency with the department's mission through training, program develop- 
ment and quality assurance. 

Achievements 

Today, people with mental retardation live in department funded community residential settings 
in 141 of Connecticut's 1 69 towns. These settings include staffed homes, community training homes, 
supervised apartments and supported living programs. Family support grants and respite subsidies are 
two options available to families that increase their abilities to purchase needed services and supports 
thus allowing people with mental retardation to remain at home. In addition, early intervention 
services have been expanded to keep pace with the increasing number of eligible children. These 
services keep children close to their families and promote good relationships. 

Department staff, private providers, families, advocates and board and advisory council members 
embrace the department's mission and acknowledge the value and powerful influence life in 
integrated settings has on the lifestyles and outcomes a person with mental retardation experiences. 
A significant number and variety of training initiatives have been conducted and continue to deepen 
people's understanding of the quality of life issues addressed in the department's mission. 

In the past ten years several segregated settings have experienced significant people reductions and 
several have been closed. 

Connecticut, recognized as a leader in supported employment, has over 4,600 individuals served 
by the department as part of the Connecticut workforce - 396 competitively employed; 2,060 

220 



MENTAL RETARDATION 



221 



participating in supported employment; 2,109 in sheltered employment and 129 are client workers 
who are paid employees of the department. 

The department has adopted a practice of establishing primary care physicians for all individuals 
served by the department. Increasing numbers of individuals receive health and dental services in the 
community rather than in department settings. People receive training in health care topics such as 
AIDS, nutrition, and exercise and fitness at local generic community agencies. 

The department has flattened its organizational structure and, through attrition, reduced its 
management workforce by 25 percent. A state-of-the-art mainframe data system automates client, 
personnel, financial and program quality information. A monthly management reporting system to 
produce regional comparison and trend analysis information in key programmatic and financial areas 
has been developed. 

In an external audit of quality assurance, the department was applauded for "creating amultifaceted 
values-driven quality assurance system... one of the most comprehensive in the country." 

Major program development initiatives have resulted in service improvements in the department's 
individual planning process, housing subsidy, community training home, respite and family support 
services. Examples of service innovations include the overall services process, family support grant, 
supported living and community experience programs. 



July 1, 15>92 Statistics 



Present Caseload 

Clents in residential settings 

public 

private 

Clients awaiting residential placement 
Clients in day programs 

public 

private 

Clients awaiting day programs 
Clients living at home 
Families receiving support grants 



11,690 
5,528 
2,566 
2,962 

984 
6,053 
1,434 
5,629 

520 
5,116 

243 



Organizational Structure 

The department's organizational structure includes a small central office, six regions and the 
Southbury Training School. The statutorily established Council on Mental Retardation advises the 
commissioner on planning, budget and a variety of topics. 

The central office is located at 90 Pitkin Street in East Hartford and consists of the office of the 
commissioner and deputy commissioners; divisions of financial management; human resources; 
planning and development; quality assurance; management information; data processing and the 
unified school district #3. 

Each region and the Southbury Training School provides an array of residential, day service and 
family support programs. These programs may be provided directly by the region or training school 
or through contracts with private provider organizations throughout the state. The regions and 
Southbury Training School are located as follows: 



Region 1- Steven Staugaitis, Ph.D., director 

451 Bank St., Waterbury 06708 
Region 2 - Terry Roberts, director 

The Exchange Suite 260, 270 Farmington Ave. 

Farmington, CT 06032 
Region 3 - Thomas Sullivan, director 

670 Main St., Willimantic, CT 06226 
Region 4 - Linda Underwood, director 

115 Virginia Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06610 
Region 5 - Rosemarie Burton, director 

104 South Turnpike Rd., Wallingford, CT 06492 
Region 6 - Kathryn duPree, director 

36 Shore Rd., Waterford, CT 06385 
Southbury Training School - Thomas Howley, Ph.D., director 

Southbury, CT 06488 



222 MENTAL RETARDATION 

Affirmative Action 

The Department of Mental Retardation hires employees in accordance with principles of affirmative 
action and encourages the promotion of women and minorities after they join the workforce. 

It is the objective of the department to achieve the full and fair participation of women, blacks, 
hispanics, persons with disabilities and other protected groups in our workforce as set forth in Conn. 
Gen. Statutes Sec. 46a-61. In line with this commitment, the department will not knowingly do 
business with any contractor, subcontractor, bidder or supplier of materials who discriminates against 
members of a protected class. 

Affirmative action and the provision of equal opportunities for advancement are immediate and 
necessary objectives for the department. These objectives are commensurate with the state's policy 
of compliance with all federal and state constitutional provisions, laws, regulations, guidelines and 
executive orders that prohibit or outlaw discrimination. This applies to all aspects of the employment 
process including recruitment, selection, hiring, training, promotions, benefits, compensation, 
layoffs and terminations. The primary goal of department's affirmative action plan is to eliminate 
underutilization of, or discrimination against, protected class persons in all aspects of the above. 
Further, the department pledges affirmatively to provide services and programs in a fair and impartial 



Developmental Disabilities 

The Developmental Disabilities Council is an independent entity, operating under Public Law 101- 
496, composed of gubernatorially-appointed members, and attached administratively to the Department 
of Mental Retardation. The council's mission is to promote empowerment and full integration of 
people with developmental disabilities and their families by changing systems to support interde- 
pendence, productivity, and accessibility in natural community life. This year, the council awarded 
$504,972 in grants, with new priorities addressing person-centered employment, inclusive education, 
minority communities, long-term care, issues of aging and developmental disabilities, training for 
United Ways and foundations, and video production. 




MENTAL HEALTH 



Department of Mental Health 

ALBERT J. SOLNIT, M.D., Commissioner 

Melodie J. Peet, M.P.H., Deputy Commissioner 

Kenneth Marcus, M.D., Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1953 Statutory authority - Sec. 17-207b 

Central Office - 90 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $249,314,264 

Capital outlay - $474,329 



Department of Mental Health 



The priority groups for services funded or operated by the department are persons with severe 
and prolonged mental illness; persons at risk of psychiatric hospitalization; and persons who 
are poor and are suffering from a primary psychiatric disorder. 

The Department of Mental Health (DMH) operates nine facilities. These include the three large 
hospitals, Connecticut Valley Hospital in Middletown, Fairfield Hills Hospital in Newtown, and 
Norwich Hospital inNorwich; Cedarcrest Regional Hospital, a regional inpatient facility in Newington; 
four community centers, the Capital Region Mental Health Center in Hartford (operated jointly by 
DMH and the University of Connecticut Health Center), the Connecticut Mental Health Center in 
New Haven (operated jointly by DMH and Yale University), the F.S. DuBois Center in Stamford, the 
Greater Bridgeport Community Mental Health Center in Bridgeport; and Whiting Forensic Institute 
in Middletown for mentally ill offenders. The department also provides funding to private non-profit 
agencies to operate community mental health services. These services include residential, case 
management, vocational rehabilitation, social rehabilitation, outpatient, crisis resolution, partial 
hospitalization and consultation/education services. 

Connecticut's 169 cities and towns are grouped into 23 catchment areas, which are organized into 
five mental health planning regions that provide structural context for administration within the 
department. DMH funds and programs are administered through a regional office located in each 
region, and each regional director is accountable for the development, direction and coordination of 
all mental health programs and services within the region. 

The regions and areas form geographic building blocks for Connecticut's mental health service 
system. In addition, these divisions provide a structure for the advisory groups that assist the 
department in planning and resource allocation decisions. Thus, each region has a regional mental 
health board and, within each region, each catchment area has a catchment area council. The regional 
structure is designed to integrate all components of each mental health service area into a single 
regional system of care. 

The commissioner of Mental Health is advised by the state Board of Mental Health, a 20-member 
advisory group, made up often gubernatorial appointees, five regional mental health board chairmen 
and five regional board appointees. During the 1991-92 fiscal year, the state board chairperson was 
JoAnn Peters and Donald G. Miller was vice chairperson. Other appointees were Barbara Bresler, 
Mary N. Christine, PhilippaM. Coughlan, Bruny Germain, Joseph F. Legg, John Strauss, and William 
L. Webb, Jr.. Regional representation included Louis Schulman and Mary Brackett, Region I; Claire 
Phelan and Abigail Gerhard, Region II; Curt Beck and Eleanor Faber, Region IE; Michael Kurs and 
Ronald Kraatz, Region IV; and Ann Haig and Renato Ricciuti, Region V. At the close of the year, there 
was one vacancy on the board. 

1991-1992 Overview 

The department's efforts during the year focused on using existing resources to offer clients the 
kinds of services and programs they need and want. The Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of State 
Hospitals was convened in October 1991 to advise the commissioner on a future course of action for 
the department's major inpatient facilities. Representing a diversity of interests and backgrounds, the 
committee pursued a number of perspectives focusing on clinical, fiscal and human resource 

224 



MENTAL HEALTH 225 



considerations. In its final report, the committee recommended a continuing reduction in patient 
census over the next five years and further definition of the role and structure of the hospitals within 
the overall service system. Supporting recommendations call for the continuing development of 
community programs designed to meet special patient needs and creative human resource and 
financing strategies which support the development and continuing integration of hospital and 
community programs. The committee's report provides apolicy blueprint for system change over the 
next five years. 

An important initiative was undertaken to plan and develop new community-based services for 
long-term state hospital patients by reallocating resources from the larger state hospitals to community- 
based services. Known as the Managed Service System initiative, it includes $3,575,000 in new 
community program expansion funds reallocated from state hospital budgets, $ 1 million in temporary 
rental assistance funds for people with serious mental illness who are on public housing authorities' 
Section 8 waiting lists, and the additional redeployment of 82 state hospital positions into community- 
based assertive community treatment teams. This initiative will support the placement of 1 80 clients 
in alternative community settings. 

As part of the work of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of State Hospitals every long-stay 
patient in the department's inpatient facilities was assessed to determine the intensity of each patient' s 
service need and the level of treatment and support services required to sustain an acceptable quality 
of life outside a hospital setting. Follow-up efforts began during the year with the formation of a series 
of program development work groups to design appropriate new programs. 

The Department of Mental Health continued to collaborate with the Department of Income 
Maintenance in monitoring the movement of psychiatric patients in and out of nursing homes. The 
two departments also worked closely together to implement the Medicaid Targeted Case Manage- 
ment Option. During the year, the department established a new Revenue Management Unit, which 
will focus on maximizing revenue reimbursement and coordinating revenue activities in conjunction 
with the Bureau of Collection Services of the Department of Administrative Services. 

On April 9, 1992, the department converted to a new management information system which 
integrates a clinical information system and a general ledger product. For the first time, the department 
is able to describe its unduplicated client population and track individuals through inpatient and 
community -based services which are operated by the department. 

Office of the Commissioner 
Affirmative Action 

The Department of Mental Health's commitment to affirmative action is reflected in the continued 
100 percent approval rating of affirmative action plans submitted to the Commission on Human 
Rights and Opportunities. All department plans continue to achieve annual filing status. Nondiscrimi- 
nation on the basis of sexual orientation is an integral part of the department's nondiscrimination 
posture and is clearly set forth in the commissioner's policy statement on affirmative action. 

Implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is well under way with activities 
being coordinated by the Chief of Affirmative Action and Patients' Rights. Accessibility surveys have 
been completed for all Department of Mental Health facilities and transition plans are being 
developed. All department affirmative action officers are currently undergoing training in the 
provisions of ADA and they will in turn train other staff. In addition, the chief of affirmative action 
and patients' rights is chairing the exhibits committee for the Second Annual Disability Awareness 
Day. 

The Affirmative Action Division also administers the Department of Mental Health's Merit 
Promotion Program. The program is carefully monitored to ensure that protected class persons are 
appropriately represented in this process. 

Patients' Rights 

The department's long established Patients' Rights Division continues to provide advocacy 
services to patients in state mental health facilities. The Patients' Rights Division also provides 
information, consultation, program materials, and other advocacy services to department facilities 
and the general public. The program is widely used by patients, families and significant others, which 
is evidenced by a continued volume of service requests that were processed during the year. 

The Chief of Affirmative Action and Patients' Rights is designated as the Patient Advocate for the 
department, has unlimited access to all patients and mental health facilities, and functions independent 
of the facilities with an accountability to the Commissioner of Mental Health. Patients have direct 
access to the Patient Advocate. 



226 MENTAL HEALTH 



Legislative Activities 

The General Assembly convened in February and ended in May 1992 for the "short" session which 
traditionally deals with budgetary issues. As a result, the department's focus was on the development 
of a budget which balanced both the state's economic realities and the needs of persons with mental 
illness in Connecticut. 

Legislation was enacted which transferred responsibility for the compulsive gamblers treatment 
and rehabilitation program from the Department of Mental Health to the Connecticut Alcohol and 
Drug Abuse Commission (PA 92-216). 

An amendment was added to a bill which provided confidentiality to communications between 
patients and either social workers or marital/family therapists. The amendment permits a patient's 
records or communications with either a psychologist or psychiatrist to be disclosed to the family of 
a homicide victim where the patient, on or after July 1, 1989, has been found not guilty by reason of 
insanity. The family or their legal representative must request this disclosure not later than six years 
after the findings of not guilty and the communications shall only be available for use during the 
pendency of a civil action. These provisions (PA 92-225) take effect July 1, 1992. 

PA 92-253, An Act Concerning Family Care Homes for the Mentally 111, provides that family care 
homes shall no longer be licensed as of October 1, 1993. Additionally, the Department of Health 
Services shall not issue any initial licenses to family care homes between the date the act takes effect 
and October 1,1993. 

Special Act 92-20 provides for the reorganization of human services in Connecticut. This will be 
accomplished over the next few years and will include agency mergers and realignment of some 
services. 

Special Act 92-22 provides that there will be uniform service delivery boundaries. In addition, the 
Office of Policy and Management must prepare a report outlining a strategy to establish, to the extent 
possible, by July 1, 1994 six uniform service regions for all state agencies. 

Housing 

The Director of Housing Resources position was created in 1991 to advance the availability of 
decent, safe, affordable housing and support services for persons with prolonged mental illness. 
Several major projects were undertaken during the year. One of these was the development of the 
Connecticut application for the Shelter Plus Care grant program funded by the Federal Department 
of Housing and Urban Development. This grant program is unique in that several Connecticut state 
agencies collaborated and contributed resources required for the "dollar for dollar" match of 
comprehensive and coordinated support services . Participating agencies included the Departments of 
Human Resources, Housing, Health, and Mental Health and the Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Abuse 
Commission. This collaboration resulted in Connecticut being chosen as one of thirty-three sites 
nationally to receive federal funding for housing for homeless mentally ill persons. 

The department's own initiative toward improving standards of housing for persons with mental 
illness came in the form of a Bridge Subsidy Program. This program will provide temporary rent 
subsidy funds to consumers being discharged from state hospitals so they can access the housing 
market while waiting for state or federal subsidized apartments. Once the consumer receives a state 
or federal subsidy, the Bridge Subsidy is then withdrawn. 

Consumer Education 

During the year, a Coordinator of Consumer Education was appointed in the Office of the 
Commissioner. The coordinator will promote activities throughout the state to educate consumers, 
families, providers, students and the general public, in order to reduce misunderstandings and 
prejudice surrounding mental illness. The coordinator will also conduct staff training to ensure that 
the consumer perspective is recognized and taken into account in the provision of mental health 
services. The overriding goals of these efforts are for people with psychiatric disabilities to be able 
to live with dignity and respect in their neighborhood, to get jobs of their choice, and to return to 
productive lives. 

Nursing Services 

Nursing Services continued to provide leadership and consultation to various levels of nursing 
personnel during the year. A primary focus of nursing services at all department facilities has been 
to minimize the impact of the state's fiscal crisis on patients' lives through the provision of competent 
nursing care. Nursing leaders met monthly, focusing on the management of ward closures and facility 
consolidation, the possible closure of one or two state hospitals and discussion of alternative models 
of nursing care delivery. 



MENTAL HEALTH 227 



Ongoing support and supervision was provided via case conferences and open forums as well as 
through continuing education workshops and programs. The department sponsored its Seventh 
Annual Nursing Conference for registered nurses on "Exploring the Mystery of Relapse in Schizo- 
phrenia." Approximately 265 participants attended the event which included consumer and family 
representation for the first time. 

The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) conducted annual surveys at all department 
hospitals and each facility maintained full certification. Three-year accreditation by the Joint 
Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations was also received by Connecticut Valley 
Hospital, Fairfield Hills Hospital and Norwich Hospital. 

Additional areas of focus for nursing services were the Clozapine grant, smoke-free hospitals, and 
adherence to OSHA Standards regarding Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens. Proce- 
dural work continues for Medical Staff Bylaw review, credential and privileging activities and 
implementation of various modules of the new management information system. 

Quality Assurance, Evaluation, and Research 

Quality assurance aims to ensure that services improve the quality of clients' lives and that these 
positive impacts are achieved in a cost- 
effective manner. The department continued statewide quality assurance activities as part of 
planning for managed service systems. 

In support of the work of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of State Hospitals, an assessment 
of all long-term patients in four state psychiatric hospitals was conducted during December 199 1 and 
January 1992. The assessment identified individuals currently residing in state psychiatric hospitals 
who could be served effectively within community -based systems of care. The assessment also 
identified the intensity of eachpatient's service need and the degree of community support which will 
be required when the patient is discharged. 

Through its increasing commitment to research activities the department funds research at the 
Abraham Ribicoff Research Facility and the Center for Studies of Prolonged Psychiatric Disorders 
at the Connecticut Mental Health Center, an agency funded and operated jointly with Yale University. 
These research activities have led to discoveries of new treatments for various forms of mental illness 
and several investigators have received awards for their research. 

The department's own emerging research focus is evidenced by five major research grants from 
the National Institute of Mental Health. Two of these grants examine two styles of service delivery 
for persons with severe and persistent mental disorders. The objective of the research is to determine 
which style (assertive community treatment or discrete, specialized services linked together via case 
managers) is most effective with respect to maintaining community adjustment, enhancing the quality 
of clients' lives, minimizing family burden, andminimizing cost. Other research projects examine the 
effectiveness of respite alternatives to inpatient care and the impact of providing companions for 
people being discharged from state hospitals . The most recently funded research project addresses the 
cost-effectiveness of clozapine, an improved but very expensive new treatment for schizophrenia 
indicated for patients who have failed to respond adequately to standard antipsychotic drugs. 

Interagency Collaboration Project 

Seven agencies (DMH, DHR, DMR, DCYS, CAD AC, DOHS and DIM) met monthly during the 
year to formulate strategies for improving interagency collaboration. The agencies have agreed that, 
through collaboration, persons served out-of-state can be returned to Connecticut. More than 200 
clients presently out-of-state have been identified as potential candidates for return, including 140 
children, 25 persons with mental retardation and 45 persons with traumatic brain injury. 

A model for collaboration has been developed which utilizes case conferences to organize each 
person's return and which ensures that the data obtained in the conferences is available for more 
rational program planning. The model has been developed in eastern Connecticut with a pre-existing 
group of human service agency regional offices and case conferences have been held on selected 
cases. 

Nursing Facility Assessments 

During the year, the Department's Clinical Systems Analysis unit worked in accordance with the 
federal Nursing Home Reform Act, to ensure that nursing home residents with mental illness receive 
the care appropriate to their needs. Staff reviewed information on each nursing facility resident or 
prospective resident who has a psychiatric disability to determine their need for nursing facility 
services and for 24-hour psychiatric treatment. Over 350 preadmission reviews and more than 2,000 
resident reviews were conducted during the year. 



228 MENTAL HEALTH 



Clinical Systems Analysis unit has utilized the data obtained through the reviews to work more 
closely with the State Department on Aging to connect nursing f acilities with the mental health service 
system. In addition, training of nursing facility staff concerning mental illness has become an 
increased focus. 

Administrative and Fiscal Services 

Administrative and Fiscal Services is responsible for ensuring that sound financial practices are 
followed in the operation of all DMH services. During FY 1992, DMH developed a new Revenue 
Management Unit, which will focus on maximizing revenue reimbursement and coordinating 
revenue activities in conjunction with the Bureau of Collection Services of the Department of 
Administrative Services. The DMH General Fund appropriation for FY 1992 totaled $265,828,017. 
At the beginning of the year holdbacks totaling $13,828,161 were initiated in order to balance the 
State's budget. In January an additional cut of $400,000 was initiated to further the objective of 
balancing the budget thus making the total funds available $252,241,856. Estimated expenses for FY 
1992 were $250,870,499 including $50,811,591 in grants to community-based non-profit mental 
health providers. 

Department-operated programs generated an estimated $30,000,000 in revenues for collection by 
the Bureau of Collection Services. These revenues include third-party reimbursement from Medicare, 
Medicaid and private insurance. 

The Program Management Services section is responsible for coordinating the department's 
system of purchasing mental health services at the community, regional and facility levels. During 
FY 1992, the section reviewed 142 grant applications and analyzed 187 audits of grantee agencies 
submitted by the department's five regional offices. In addition, 365 contracts for professional 
services were processed. 

Facilities Management and Engineering Services 

This section, responsible for maintaining and improving the environmental quality and physical 
safety of DMH facilities, initiated 69 capital projects with a value of $7 .3 million during the fiscal year. 
In addition, planning, design and construction continue on prior year projects valued at more than $25 
million. Those projects are designed to enhance physical plant safety, provide program accessibility, 
maintain buildings and their infrastructure and upgrade hospital environments by air conditioning 
patient treatment and living areas. 

All facilities of the Department of Mental Health were inspected by the State Fire Marshal's Office, 
and remained in compliance or have an approved plan of correction with the State Life Safety Code 
and other health and safety codes. 

Human Resource Management 

The Human Resources Management section is responsible for the administration and coordination 
of personnel and labor relations activities within the Office of the Commissioner and its eight 
facilities. 

Major initiatives during the year included: leadership recruitments for Fairfield Hills Hospital, F.S . 
DuBois Center, Greater Bridgeport Community Mental Health Center and Capital Region Mental 
Health Center; recruitment for a Psychiatric Social Work Administrator; a clerical/support staff needs 
assessment; collaboration with the Director of Staff Development to deliver a second leadership and 
training program for new supervisors; planning, coordination, implementation and subsequent 
recision of mandated layoffs prior to negotiated agreements; and coordination and implementation 
of the Voluntary Leave Program, Early Retirement Incentive Program, and Placement and Training 
Programs for laid-off employees pursuant to the various agreements. 

While layoff and related activities dominated the unit for much of the year, ongoing activities were 
maintained in grievance handling, revision and development of job specifications, policy /procedure 
revision and development, and in-house training of staff. 

Safety and Security 

The Safety and Security division manages the department's safety and public safety programs at 
its facilities. Specific activities include: patient and staff safety programs, supervision of the workers ' 
compensation program and technical supervision of facility police lieutenants. 

During the year the DMH Director of Safety and Security Management served as a member of a 
Department of Administrative Services panel which reviewed and made recommendations to the 
Commissioner of Administrative Services on the selection of a new Third Party Administrator to 
manage workers' compensation claims. This was an important step in the effort to reduce the overall 



MENTAL HEALTH 229 



cost of work related injuries across all state agencies. 

Management Information Services 

During the year, the department converted to a new management information system which 
integrates a clinical information system and a general ledger product. The client information system 
provides a unique patient identifier which links all client descriptive information, episodes of care, 
and service events by staff, program (cost center) and provider organization, to each individual served 
by any facility operated by the Department. For the first time, the Department is able to describe its 
unduplicated client population and track individuals through inpatient and community -based services 
which are operated by the Department. 

Region I 

Joseph Lupo, Ph.D., Regional Director 

Region I consists of the 14 cities and towns of lower Fairfield County (southwestern Connecticut), 
including Bridgeport, the state's largest city and one of the poorest. The region's population is 
approximately 630,000. An estimated 4,722 residents are seriously mentally ill. 

The regional office is responsible for the F.S. DuBois Center in Stamford and the Greater 
Bridgeport Community Mental Health Center (GBCMHC). Sixty-two programs in 23 non-state 
operated community agencies were funded, including $8,064,702 in community grants funds, 
$429,772 in federal mental health funds ( ADMS) and $203,837 in PATH Homeless block grant funds. 

Fairfield Hills Hospital is located in Region V but serves Region I as well; over half of the patients 
are Region I residents. The regional office and Region I agencies work together with the Hospital to 
coordinate services to Region I residents. 

The regional office has designated the F.S. DuBois Center, Norwalk Hospital, and the greater 
Bridgeport Community Mental Health Center as the lead agencies for the greater Stamford, greater 
Norwalk, and greater Bridgeport service areas respectively. These agencies are responsible for 
coordinating mental health services in their respective areas and are responsible for area patients who 
are currently preparing to leave state inpatient facilities to return to their home communities. 

During the year, a bimonthly planning and monitoring meeting for grant-funded program directors 
and a monthly agency directors' meeting was established in catchment area 1 to improve service 
coordination and linkage with Fairfield Hills Hospital. 

A coordinated case management and service delivery system has begun to be developed in 
catchment area 2. 

The Southwest Regional Mental Health Board continued its planning, evaluation, and advocacy 
activities, undertaking nine reviews, with volunteer hours totaling 685. The board participated in a 
public hearing at Fairfield Hills Hospital before the Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of State 
Hospitals. The board provided an opportunity for 60 consumers to travel to Hartford and meet with 
legislators to discuss the effects of budget decisions on their lives. 

The board and the regional office organized a conference entitled: "Housing and Support Services 
for People With Mental Illness." The conference, which brought together people from the mental 
health and housing fields, included over 25 presentations on topics related to housing and support 
services. The regional office also arranged for consultation to Bridge House and Keystone House from 
the Institute of Human Resource Development. 

In Stamford, the Consumer Council moved into permanent space at the F.S. DuBois Center and 
conducted an evening program called the Wellness Project with discussions on subjects such as 
nutrition, medication and self- advocacy. 

The Bridgeport Consumer Council began this fiscal year by organizing a program which included 
presentations by consumer council members regarding issues such as housing, legal services, 
advocacy and stigma. 

Greater Bridgeport Community Mental Health Center 

Suzanne M. Cooney, M.P.H., Director 

The center, recertified by the Health Care Finance Administration this year, is divided into three 
clinical divisions: 

Community Services Division: The Mobile Crisis Team expanded its program serving patients with 
either schizophrenia or bi-polar illness coupled with substance abuse and serious character pathology. 
There were 14,495 crisis contacts with 670 visits in the Bridgeport community. The Community 
Treatment Team (CTT) restored 15 patients to a higher level of functioning allowing their transfer to 
less intensive services. Another 25 patients have been identified for transfer. CTT staff presented at 
a national conference during the year. The Homeless Outreach Team (HOT) added a nurse clinician 



230 MENTAL HEALTH 



whose role is to serve mentally ill substance abusers. HOT staff recently published an article in the 
New England Journal of Public Policy. 

Outpatient Services Division: The Outpatient Services Division reorganized its services during the 
last year which included implementing a formal tiering process designed to reallocate resources to 
individuals with the greatest need. The divisional structure moved from seven to five units with a 
census of 150 clients per unit. The leadership of each unit consists of a unit chief, senior clinical 
consultant and unit physician. Substance abuse and rehabilitation staff were added to the units. The 
group therapies and prevocational programs expanded. Client contacts for the year totaled 66,503 
with 897 of those visits in the community. 

Hospitalization and Transitional Services Division: The Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) 
had 386 admissions with an average daily census of 16.4 patients. The Acute Day Hospital (ADH) 
had 278 admissions with an average census of 13.4. The Transitional Residence Program (TRP) had 
422 admissions with an average census of 17.1. The Substance Abuse Service (SAS) had 410 
admissions to Detoxification, 135 admissions to Rehabilitation and 100 admissions to nonmedical 
Detoxification. 

F. S. Dubois Center 

James M. Lehane HI, M.P.H., Director 

The F. S. DuBois Center provides community psychiatric and support services to adults with 
psychiatric disability from the greater Greenwich/Stamford/Nor walk areas (catchment areas 1 and 2). 
The center is organized into two clinical divisions. The Acute Services Division offers crisis 
intervention, intake, and partial hospitalization services. The Continuing Services Division offers 
clinical case management, outpatient, psychosocial and prevocational services primarily to persons 
residing in the greater Stamford area. In August 1991, James M. Lehane, HI, M.P.H., was appointed 
the new permanent director. 

During the year, 2,249 individuals used one or more of the center's services. As of June 30, 1992, 
the center's active caseload in all programs was 246. Budgetary and site constraints resulted in the 
closing of the center's two-bed respite apartment located in Norwalk. 

In order to maximize the utilization of staff and space, the center reorganized during the year. The 
Community Services Division, including intake and community liaison services, joined with the 
Acute Services Division and relocated from the 49 Glenbrook Road site to the 652 Glenbrook Road 
location. This resulted in the establishment of one portal of entry for all persons obtaining services 
at the center. The Partial Hospitalization Program has also relocated toe 652 Glenbrook Road. This 
allowed the Continuing Treatment Unit to function more effectively, changing from a large clinical 
case management team to two smaller teams. 

Additionally, it afforded the space necessary to implement a medication group format beginning 
July 6, 1992. 

During the year, the Department of Mental health (DMH) designated the F. S. DuBois Center as 
the lead agency for mental health services in catchment area 1 (Stamford and Greenwich). A bi- 
monthly planning and monitoring meeting for grant-funded program directors and a monthly agency 
directors meeting was established to improve the coordination of services and linkage with Fairfield 
Hills Hospital. 

On May 11, 1992, the center hosted a group of 12 medical and human service professionals from 
the Commonwealth of Independent States. This provided an educational interchange of information 
on approaches to mental health care in the respective countries. 

Region II 

John H. Simsarian, Regional Director 

Region II consists of 35 cities and towns of south-central Connecticut with a population of 
approximately 770,000. Nearly 5,860 persons in the region have serious mental illness. The region 
comprises six catchment areas for purposes of service planning and delivery. The Regional Director 
is responsible for two state facilities serving the Region: Connecticut Valley Hospital (CVH) in 
Middletown, and the Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC) in New Haven. 

During the year, the regional office provided fiscal and programmatic management of 78 grant 
funded programs at 25 community -based agencies throughout the region. A total of $1 1,778,620 in 
state community grant funds and $572,034 in federal ADMHS Block Grant funds were administered 
to these programs for the provision of community based mental health services. The region also 
received $143,103 in federal funding for mental health services to homeless people. 

During the year, the region's six catchment areas under the auspices of area based "lead agencies" 



MENTAL HEALTH 231 



continued to develop managed systems of care with emphasis on accessibility and integration of 
services, including expanded linkages between catchment area agencies, Connecticut Valley Hos- 
pital and Middletown Health Care Center. Five area lead agencies developed and implemented 
enhancements of their service systems under the Managed Service System Initiative (MSSI) which 
reallocated inpatient funding to community services. As part of the initiative, thirty long-term clients 
at CVH were scheduled to return to their communities and make use of intensified support services. 
An ongoing follow-up study will evaluate the level of functioning of these clients, as well as monitor 
their quality of life through self reports. 

Region II also was designated the site for the Bridge Building Project funded by the National 
Institute of Mental Health. This program matches mental health consumers with peer companions 
with the goal of fostering community integration. Initiated in three of the region's catchment areas, 
the project will study the best ways to involve consumers in community social and recreational 
activities. 

Collaboration increased with other state agencies through regional office staff involvement in joint 
client treatment planning with the Department of Mental Retardation and the Department of Children 
and Youth Services. Of particular note was a three-part region-wide training series cosponsored by 
DMH and CAD AC focused on understanding and treating persons with serious mental illness who 
are substance abusers. The collaborative relationship with the citizen advisory structure in planning 
and service monitoring continued with review by the Region II Regional Mental Health Board of 20 
programs in two grant-funded agencies and the acute inpatient service at CVH. The board utilized 95 
volunteers who donated over 2,000 hours in their planning, evaluation and advisory role. Through a 
federal planning grant, the regional board continued to support a regional primary consumer advisory 
council which was actively involved in planning consumer empowerment activities and publishing 
the region's fust consumer oriented newsletter. 

Connecticut Mental Health Center 

Ezra Griffith, M.D., Director 

The Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC) is a collaborative program between the Connecti- 
cut Department of Mental Health and Yale University with the mission of providing client services, 
research and training. This year, as the Connecticut Mental Health Center treated the annual caseload 
of 3,005 patients, the center channeled energies into helping patients live in their community, 
exploring cultural diversity, and countering the threat of substance abuse. 

Of note, $3.3 million (S2.3 million from the National Institute of Mental Health; SI million shared 
between the state and Yale University) were awarded to the Substance Abuse Treatment Unit (S ATU) 
for construction of a research center. This year, SATU also made inroads into the control of AIDS, 
with an AIDS outreach project to reach intravenous drug users (and their sexual partners) who are not 
currently in treatment. Working with the Hispanic Clinic and other New Haven agencies, SATU also 
trained 40 individuals in an intensive Hispanic Substance Abuse Counselor Training Program. 

During the latter half of the year, the center completed plans to reorganize its outpatient services 
to better meet the treatment needs of persons with severe and prolonged psychiatric illness. These 
plans call for increased resources allocated to the Crisis/Triage Unit and enhanced treatment 
collaboration by CMHC with community agencies providing housing and rehabilitation to CMHC 
patients. 

The Day Hospital provides a 30-day program to treat patients who would otherwise be hospitalized. 
During the past year, this program targeted three emerging problems: sexuality, sexual trauma and 
dissociate disorders, which seem to be major areas of difficulty for their patients. The Unit saw 20 
percent more patients than the previous year. 

The consultation center organized social skills seminars and consumer self-help groups to help 
patients function in the community. The Outpatient Department worked with colleagues at Connecti- 
cut Valley Hospital to facilitate the settling of discharged inpatients into the community. The CMHC 
Chaplain participated in three major church-based clinical/socialization group programs. In addition, 
the new Adult Autism Program made strides in nurturing this group by organizing a successful 
"Artshow of Autistic Individuals." 

As part of the many CMHC educational events, the CMHC sponsored a two-day conference that 
brought together community' leaders and scholars to reflect on problems confronted by "The Black 
Family in America" and to contemplate their possible solutions. The CMHC also organized several 
in-house events that celebrated the theme of respect for cultural diversity among staff and patients. 



232 MENTAL HEALTH 



Connecticut Valley Hospital 

Judith Normandin, M.A., Chief Executive Officer 

Connecticut Valley Hospital (CVH) is a 390-bed psychiatric hospital serving persons with severe 
and prolonged mental illness. During fiscal year 1992 the average daily census was 364 patients, a 
reduction of 1 1 percent over fiscal year 1991. CVH admitted 354 patients and discharged 426 patients. 

This fiscal year two major initiatives were planned to reduce the patient population at CVH through 
the transfer of both dollars and staff to community -based services as patients are discharged. Since 
July, 1991 CVH reduced its bed capacity by closing and consolidating wards from 20 wards to 14 
wards. Patients now reside in two buildings instead of three. 

The hospital maintains its accreditation with the Joint Commission and its certification by the 
Health Care Finance Administration. CVH is also accredited for its Psychiatric Residency Training 
Program and its Clinical Psychology Internship Program. 

On November 1, 1991, Judith Normandin was appointed Chief Executive Officer of CVH. A 
reorganization from a discipline department model to a program division model was implemented in 
December 1991 which served to reduce the number of administrative positions and emphasized an 
interdisciplinary approach to service delivery. A no-smoking policy for 

staff has been implemented with the goal of CVH becoming smoke-free for patients by January, 
1993. Battell Hall, a six-ward patient building is in the process of becoming air-conditioned. 

CVH's clinical services have been focused on transitional programs with patients attending 
community-based programs. Lead agencies for Region II worked conjointly with hospital staff to 
develop and implement planned discharges. Weekly case conferences between the Department of 
Mental Health and the Department of Mental Retardation resulted in the community placement of 
approximately 15 dually diagnosed patients from the hospital. A consolidated forensic program has 
been established and is being successfully monitored for compliance with the Roe vs. Hogan 
requirements. 

River Valley Services (RVS), a community mental health center for Catchment Area 10, under the 
auspices of CVH continues to expand its service capacity as resources are reallocated from the 
hospital to RVS. CVH and RVS. have jointly implemented a Continuous Care Model that ensures 
patient continuity regardless of locus of service delivery. This model is expected to improve quality 
of patient care and shorten hospital length of stay. 

Region III 

Virginia P. Bainbridge, M.P.H., Regional Director 

Region IE is comprised of 41 towns in eastern Connecticut. There are 399,749 citizens (1990 
estimate) living in the region of whom approximately 3,000 have serious mental illnesses. During the 
past year, as in other recent years, the majority of people with serious mental illnesses lived 
independently or with their families in towns throughout the region. Their psychiatric treatment and 
support needs were met through a range of services including: case management, outpatient services, 
and rehabilitation services funded by the Department of Mental Health. Inpatient services were 
provided by community general hospitals and, for longer term and specialized psychiatric care, by 
Norwich Hospital. 

Community based psychiatric treatment and support services were provided by 12 independent 
not-for-profit agencies operating 54 programs. The State of Connecticut, through the Department of 
Mental Health, supported these programs with $8,775,437 in community grant dollars and $507,596 
in ADM Block Grant dollars. Federal funds in the amount of $258,587 provided additional 
programming such as outreach to mentally ill people who are homeless and Assertive Community 
Treatment to 50 people with a high level of need. 

During state fiscal year 1992, consumers, families, providers and advocates worked together to 
improve the service systems in the region. One major effort was the planning and initiation of a state 
operated mental health center to be the mental health authority for the 20 towns in the southern half 
of the region. This mental health authority will be responsible and accountable for the clinical, fiscal 
and administrative management of mental health care for citizens who are seriously mentally ill and 
poor. 

Another major effort was the development of a regional quality assurance steering committee and 
subcommittees for case management and residential services which developed and began imple- 
mentation of quality assurance indicators for program monitoring and evaluation. 

Late in the fiscal year, money was made available from the Norwich Hospital budget to initiate 
community service expansion with the goal of closing a ward at the hospital early in FY 1 993 . Twenty- 
seven new residential slots have been created and fifteen hospital staff will be transferred to 
community case management and support positions to assist in the treatment of the patients being 



MENTAL HEALTH 233 



placed. Additional patients will be discharged to the Hartford area under the same initiative. 

Region HI served as the pilot region for the Interagency Collaboration Project to bring clients back 
to Connecticut from placements out of state. Through interagency case reviews and program 
planning, new ways are being developed to meet the needs of multi-problem clients and to work 
together as 

state agencies. During the first few months of the project, two clients were returned to Connecticut 
from out of state programs. Several additional clients will be reviewed early in FY 1993. 

The past year saw a change in leadership in United Services, Inc., the lead agency for the 21 towns 
in the northern half of the region. Sheila Amdur retired as Executive Director in January, leaving a 
strong agency with a long history of managing a system of services which is responsive to the needs 
of people with serious mental illnesses. Theodore Ver Haagh was appointed Executive Director in 
February. 

The Eastern Regional Mental Health Board (ERMHB) together with the Regional office was 
responsible for providing 30 educational initiatives for over 2,500 consumers, families, staff, general 
public, and high school students this past year. The semiannual ERMHB Newsletter and Self-Help 
Support Group Guide were distributed to over 200 individuals. The board reviewed six DMH funded 
programs while volunteers contributed 6,600 hours to the planning and development of mental health 
services in the region. 

Norwich Hospital 

Garrell S. Mullaney, M.H.A., Superintendent 

Norwich Hospital provided inpatient services as part of the developing managed service systems 
in both Regions EQ and IV. There were 311 admissions for this period and 338 discharges. In response 
to fiscal constraints, three wards were closed in order to consolidate staffing requirements. While 
layoffs were avoided, the early retirement of 76 staff affected the delivery of services in many areas. 
In order to meet the demand for services with a decreased number of beds, the hospital developed a 
system of patient movement from its admission ward through an intermediate care ward and on to 
rehabilitation wards in order to maximize treatment efficiency. Coupled with increased community 
program development in the spring of 1992, discharges increased for the period allowing for the 
closure of a 35 -bed ward. This will allow for a major transition of hospital staff to community 
programs within Region III. Once assigned to the community, the staff will follow discharged 
patients, assisting them through their transition period with a goal of decreasing reliance on more 
expensive inpatient services. A similar process for Region IV is expected to begin during the summer. 

During the fiscal year, the hospital received notification of its continuing accreditation by the Joint 
Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and certification by the Health Care 
Finance Administration. The Psychiatric Residency Program was also accredited by the College of 
Graduate Medical Education of the American Medical Association. 

Program development continued particularly in services for patients with a dual diagnosis of mental 
retardation and mental illness and for patients with traumatic brain injury. 

Region IV 

Kathleen Fox, A.C.S.W., Regional Director 

The Region IV service area consists of 38 towns in north-central Connecticut and has a population 
base of 950,037 (1990 population). An estimated 7,100 persons within Region IV have severe and 
prolonged mental illness. 

The Region IV Office, located in Newington, provides regional coordination of Cedarcrest 
Regional Hospital, and jointly with the University of Connecticut, the Capital Region Mental Health 
Center in Hartford (including Hartford Crisis Intervention Center), which provides crisis, community 
psychiatric, and community support programs. 

The Region IV Office also maintains contracts and monitors the services of 23 community -based 
agencies operating 65 programs. In FY 1992, Department of Mental Health community grant 
expenditures were $12,548,879. An additional $589,758 in ADM Block Grant funding, $80,850 in 
Mental Health Services to the Homeless funding, $223,000 in Bridge Subsidy funding, and $197,700 
in Managed Service System start-up funding brought Region IV 's grants account total expenditures 
to $13,640,187. 

In Region IV, FY 1992 was a year characterized by change. Kathleen Fox, ACSW was appointed 
regional director in December. The leadership at Cedarcrest Regional Hospital and Capital Region 
Mental Health Center also changed, as described below. A renewed, emphasis on area-based managed 
service systems and lead agency development resulted. In catchment area 15, the Managed Care 
Development Consortium continued to grow as the informal single point of entry to DMH-funded 



234 MENTAL HEALTH 



programs in the area. The Consortium is also acting as the interim "lead agency" in the catchment area 
until a lead agency is formally designated. The regional director and her staff are working closely with 
the consortium and the catchment area council in the lead agency development and appointment 
process. In catchment areas 1 6 and 17, the sole DMH-funded provider in the areas, Inter-Community 
Mental Health Group and North Central Connecticut Mental Health System, respectively, have been 
named lead agencies. In catchment area 18, discussions are underway to determine how to approach 
lead agency development in the area. In catchment area 19, a Managed Service System Committee 
formed jointly by the regional office and catchment area council recommended to the regional office 
that Community Mental Health Affiliates (CMHA) assume lead agency responsibility. The regional 
director designated CMHA lead agency in April. In catchment area 23, efforts proceeded to make 
operational the duties of Capital Region Mental Health Center as the designated lead agency. 

A lead agency directors' group has been constituted in the region. This group meets monthly with 
the regional director and members have attended statewide lead agency technical assistance sessions. 
Additionally, the regional director has participated in numerous meetings and discussions with 
catchment area council members regarding managed service system and lead agency development 
throughout the region. 

A major programmatic undertaking in the region was the Managed Service System Initiative begun 
in May. The region received $840,000 in annualized funding to place 48 persons discharged from 
Norwich and Connecticut Valley Hospitals in the community by June 30, 1993. The goal of this 
initiative is twofold: 1) achieve targeted savings as a result of ward closings, and 2) to expand 
residential program coverage to 24-hours and form the base for an assertive community treatment 
(ACT) team in each affected area. 

In catchment area 23, a transfer of vacant positions will result in an ACT team at CRMHC. As more 
wards close, it is anticipated that resources will be transferred from Norwich and Connecticut Valley 
Hospitals to the community, to form additional ACT teams. 

Managed service system initiatives during the year included appointing a Regional Managed 
Service System Initiative Coordinator, planning for discharge task forces in all catchment areas, and 
hiring new staff in residential grantee agencies. 

During the year, the North Central Regional Mental Health Board and catchment area council 
members contributed over 3,000 hours of volunteer time and conducted 19 program reviews. Five 
family education courses, attended by 48 family members, were held in the region. The Regional 
Mental Health Board coordinated consumer/family workshops in five of the six catchment areas 
culminated by a half-day workshop in Catchment Area 23 in June. 

Interagency collaboration efforts increased through Region IV participation in the Interagency 
Collaboration Project. This project represents amulti-agency initiative to return persons placed in out- 
of-state programs to in-state programs with a collaborative support system offered by project 
participants. 

Capital Region Mental Health Center 

Lillian Tamayo, Director 

In Fiscal Year 1991-92, Capital Region Mental Health Center (CRMHC) integrated the UConn- 
funded Community Treatment Unit with the Department of Mental Health's Hartford Crisis 
Intervention Center (HCIC). This program merging furthers CRMHC 's lead agency role in Catchment 
Area 23 through improved service coordination. The CRMHC offers mobile crisis services; crisis/ 
respite inpatient services; structured acute day treatment program; a community day treatment 
program; a specialized day hospital program for monolingual Hispanic clients; a hearing impaired 
program; case management, assertive outreach; and a work services program including skills training 
and supportive employment. 

During FY 1992 the Community Treatment Unit (CTU) admitted 190 new clients and served a total 
of 1,159 clients. 

HCIC, which provides community oriented crisis services, consists of two units: the Mobile Crisis 
Team and the Crisis/Respite Unit. During this fiscal year, the Mobile Crisis Team evaluated 1,216 
clients, referring 273 to state hospital care, while the remaining 943 were treated with alternative 
community services. In addition, the Mobile Crisis Team (MCT) offered telephone support and 
counseling services to over 1,200 clients as well as collateral consultations to more than 2,500. The 
MCT also initiated, in collaboration with Hartford Community Mental Health Center, a shelter 
outreach team which provides on-site clinical consultation to homeless mentally ill persons. 

The Crisis/Respite Unit expanded its bed capacity by four, increasing the census from lOto 14beds. 
The unit admitted 366 clients for crisis or respite care, discharging 95 percent of this group to the 



MENTAL HEALTH 235 



community after a brief stay. In addition, the unit provided drop- in services to over 850 clients. 

Cedarcrest Regional Hospital 

David Hunter, Ph.D., Superintendent 

Cedarcrest Regional Hospital offers acute inpatient psychiatric care to residents of Region IV. 
Services include physical and psychiatric evaluation, psychological stabilization, and discharge and 
aftercare planning. Medical and psychiatric problems are treated on site or through transfer to another 
facility as indicated. Cedarcrest patients receive nursing care, psychological services, social work 
services and rehabilitation services as needed. Cedarcrest also serves as a transitional facility for 
patients leaving state hospital rehabilitation wards who are not yet ready to reenter community living. 

During the year, Cedarcrest Regional Hospital screened 648 referrals from Region IV, admitting 
612 patients and discharging 623 patients. Of all annual admissions, 93 percent were admitted 
involuntarily via a Physicians' Emergency Certificate, four percent were admitted voluntarily and 
three percent were probated to Cedarcrest. The average daily census during the year was 79.9 patients. 
The median length of stay was 28 days. A total of 12 patients were transferred to Connecticut Valley 
and Norwich Hospitals for "extended care" services. The Hospital's goal of admitting patients from 
hospital emergency rooms within 12 hours was met, with 97.9 percent being admitted within one to 
ten hours. 

On October 1, 1991, DavidHunter, Ph.D., assumed the roleof Acting Superintendent at Cedarcrest, 
and Judith Normandin transferred to the position of Superintendent at Connecticut Valley Hospital. 
In May 1992, Roger Coleman, M.D., assumed the post of Chief of Professional Services. 

During the year, Cedarcrest Regional Hospital was recertified by the Health Care Finance 
Administration. There was no significant change in programming at Cedarcrest Regional hospital 
during the 1991-92 fiscal year. However, a number of infrastructure changes were made that will 
support program development in the coming year. Treatment Team Coordinators were introduced 
into the multi-disciplinary treatment teams of all five wards. While team psychiatrists remain the 
clinical leaders of the teams, the Treatment Team Coordinators are the administrative representatives 
on the treatment teams. 

Cedarcrest Regional Hospital is in the process of finalizing a Memorandum of Agreement with the 
Rocky Hill Veterans Home and Hospital to facilitate admissions from that facility. There also are 
plans to assign Cedarcrest psychiatrists to work part time at the Capital Region Mental Health Center 
in order to provide for continuity of care for Hartford patients. This is expected to result in significant 
diversions from hospitalization and lower lengths of stay at Cedarcrest for catchment area 23 patients. 

Region V 

Peter J. Johnson, Ph.D., Regional Director 

Region V consists of 41 cities and towns in northwest Connecticut and is divided into three 
catchment areas for purposes of service planning and provision. The Region's population is 538,645 
of whom approximately 4,040 have severe mental illness. The Region V Office has supervisory 
responsibility for Fairfield Hills Hospital in Newtown and administers $9,534,043 in state community 
grants funds and $364,342 in federal block grant funds to 22 community-based, not-for-profit 
agencies whose publicly supported activities are spread among 68 programs. 

The catchment area managed service systems have continued development and refinement of their 
operating procedures, including setting objectives and broadening their tasks, and working on 
developing grievance procedures. 

The greater Waterbury service area (catchment area 20) focused on improving coordination of 
services and is now addressing consumer involvement and utilization of resources. The greater 
Danbury area (catchment area 21) addressed resource allocation and public awareness. Catchment 
area 22 (Torrington and the Northwest Comer) has continued focusing on the development of crisis 
intervention capacity. Catchment areas 20 and 21 have been involved in the development of new 
initiatives to move clients and resources from Fairfield Hills Hospital to those two areas. 

Region V continued to actively assess the array of services to improve quality and cost efficiency. 
The overall capacity for providing residential support was increased to 300, a gain of 24 with no 
additional cost. Some reduction in clinical and vocational services were implemented as a result of 
budget cuts. 

The Regional Mental Health Board, in conjunction with the three Catchment Area Councils, 
reviewed 30 programs. The board utilized approximately 2,400 hours of volunteer efforts. The 
Consumer Action Committee has met monthly to discuss issues of concern to consumers in order to 
communicate these issues to the board for action. The group also planned and held a conference on 
self-advocacy and lobbying with 1 10 in attendance. 



236 MENTAL HEALTH 



Region V staff collaborated with grantee agencies to enhance skills and services provided to 
mentally ill substance abusers. In addition, in-service training was provided to Adult Probations, the 
Alternative Incarceration program and local high schools; visits were coordinated to various 
residential programs in and out of state to assist planning for a group home model change; a regional 
residential conference and training in consumer leadership skills were also held. 

A variety of interagency collaborations were initiated and implemented. A Regional Interagency 
Group has been formed with Directors from the Departments of Mental Retardation, Children and 
Youth Services, Corrections, Aging, Human Resources and Income Maintenance with a focus on 
housing, jobs and families. 

Fairfield Hills Hospital 

Peter J. Johnson, Ph.D., Acting Superintendent 

Fairfield Hills Hospital is a 371 -bed adult inpatient psychiatric facility accredited by the Joint 
Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and certified by the Health Care Financing 
Administration. The hospital comprises 15 wards: three acute, six rehabilitative, four geriatric, a 
developmentally disabled service ward and a medical care ward. The in-residence average daily 
census for FY 1991-92 was 395. At the end of the fiscal year, there were 368 patients in residence. 

Decreasing the Hospital's census and discharging patients to community placements were 
emphasized during the year. There were 499 admissions and 544 discharges during the year. Planning 
for an on-grounds transitional living facility and managed service system initiatives in collaboration 
with both Regions I and V were initiated during the year. 

During the year, the hospital worked with managed service system committees from catchment 
areas in Regions I and V. These committees are working to strengthen service coordination and client 
movement within their respective areas. 

The Geriatric Treatment Service was reorganized into functionally homogeneous service units. A 
collaborative planning process was initiated with the Department of Mental Retardation to determine 
the optimal program and location for developmentally disabled/emotionally disturbed patients who 
remain at the hospital. 

During the fiscal year, Fairfield Hills Hospital participated in the DMH-wide Clozapine Pilot 
Program. As of the end of the fiscal year, 61 patients were involved in the project. Clozapine therapy 
was initiated for 38 patients with the remaining 23 patients serving as control subjects. 

Although the hospital lost over 1 00 direct care and support positions due to layoffs and the statewide 
early retirement incentive, maintaining high quality care has remained paramount. 

Major construction projects totaling $7.5 million are underway for asbestos abatement and central 
air conditioning for two patient care buildings, Cochran House and Canaan House. Temporary air 
conditioning units are being utilized in Kent House to provide patients relief from the heat during the 
summer months. 

A new fitness center was established during the year and is available both to patients and staff. The 
program enables patients to address treatment objectives relating to enhancing self-esteem, attention 
span and focus, and physical fitness. 

During the year, the hospital installed a new computerized clinical information system. When it is 
fully operational, the system will provide a wide range of patient, staff and utilization trend data 
enabling appropriate resource allocation. 

Whiting Forensic Institute 

Robert T.M. Phillips, M.D., Ph.D. 

Whiting Forensic Institute is the state's only maximum security hospital and is located on the 
grounds of Connecticut Valley Hospital. Whiting provides evaluation, diagnosis and treatment to 
mentally ill offenders at all phases of the judicial process. It also provides tertiary-level forensic 
psychiatric care to patients from any state mental health or correctional facility who are in need of such 
clinical services under maximum security conditions. 

Patients treated at Whiting are referred by correctional institutions under the Department of 
Correction, the Judicial Department, or from other DMH facilities. The institute comprises two acute 
treatment units, two intermediate treatment units, a transitional treatment unit, and a diagnostic unit. 
Patients are referred to the diagnostic unit by the courts for pre-sentence ev aluation and recommendation 
for disposition under Conn. Gen. Statutes Sec. 17-244; for an initial 90-day evaluation period under 
Sec. 17-257 (not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect); or for evaluation to determine 
competency to stand trial under Sec. 54-56(d). Whiting also operates four Court Clinics, in 
Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven and Norwich, which evaluate criminal defendants for competence 
to stand trial and perform other statutorily-mandated forensic evaluations for the Commissioner of 



MENTAL HEALTH 237 



Mental Health. The Clinics also provide forensic consultation and training and conduct forensic 
research. The institute also maintains forensic consultation liaison services at each DMH regional 
hospital. 

Admissions to Whiting during FY 1992 numbered 105, including 37 readmissions, and there were 
92 discharges. The average daily census was 96 and a total of 33,667 patient days were recorded. 

In May 1990 Whiting was surveyed by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare 
Organizations for the first time and granted full accreditation status, joining a small but elite group 
of forensic hospitals so recognized nationally. 



238 MENTAL HEALTH 



Psychiatric Security Review Board 

ROBERT B. BERGER, ESQ., Chairman 

Established - 1985 Statutory authority - Sec. 17a-581 

Central Office - 90 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full- time employees - 3 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $138,640 

• 

The Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB), a five member board, has jurisdiction over all 
persons acquitted of a crime by reason of mental disease or mental defect and committed by 
the Superior Court to the Board. In 1991-92, the members of the board were Robert Berger, chairman, 
Julia Ramos Grenier, John T. Ryan, Ezra Griffith, and Harry Kunze. 

The board orders a level of supervision and treatment for an acquittee deemed necessary to protect 
society. Based on its legal findings on the danger that an acquittee poses, due to his/her mental 
condition, orders confinement in a maximum security facility, confinement at a hospital for the 
mentally ill, approves temporary leave for a confined acquittee, placement in the custody of the 
Commissioner of Mental Retardation or grants conditional release. In addition the board makes 
recommendations on the issue of discharge or continued confinement to the Superior Court. 

During 1991-92, 175 persons were under the board's jurisdiction. Twenty-six persons were initial 
commitments, two persons were removed from the board's jurisdiction. Six persons' commitment 
terms were extended by the court, after a finding that they were still dangerous at the end of the original 
term. 

In 1991-92, the board held 151 hearings and 94 case conferences resulting in 257 orders being 
issued. Of 91 contested applications, the board granted 54, totally denied 14 and denied part of the 
application in 23 instances. As of June 30, 1992, 173 persons were under the board's jurisdiction. The 
status of these persons as of June 30, 1992 is as follows: 30 percent confined in maximum security, 
46 percent confined at state hospitals for the mentally ill, 24 percent on conditional release, 1 percent 
in custody of the Commissioner of Mental Retardation. 

The board, in cooperation with the Department of Mental Health, has provided training for 
Department of Mental Health staff and community agencies . The board is assisted by the Department 
of Mental Health in meeting the Affirmative Action requirements. 



Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission 

JOHN C. HIGGINS-BIDDLE, Ph.D., Executive Director 

Established - 1977 Statutory authority - Sec. 17-155 

Central office - 999 Asylum Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06105 

Average number of full-time employees - 489 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - State - $41,829,357 

Federal - $21,172,486 

Capital outlay - $48,664 



ccdx 



The Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission (CADAC), the state's lead agency for 
the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, is responsible for the planning and 
administration of prevention and treatment initiatives and determining the most equitable, effective 
and economical use of resources. The year 1991-92 has been a year of strengthening and refocusing 
the mission of CADAC through the development of interagency and intergovernmental relationships, 
and the sponsorship of new vision in public/private sector partnership. 



MENTAL HEALTH 239 



The Interagency Coordinating Council on Substance Abuse 

In the firstmajor step in the Weicker administration's effort to coordinate substance abuse activities 
statewide, 20 state agencies expending state or federal funds on substance abuse related programs 
were brought together to form the Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC) on Substance Abuse. In 
response to a recommendation of the Thomas Commission, the ICC is working to prevent duplication 
of effort and expense, to prioritize needs and, generally, to foster cooperation and information 
exchange among agencies. It has been charged by the 

Administration with setting priorities for budget options related to substance abuse prior to 
submission to the Office of Policy and Management. 

The ICC also is cooperating with CADAC in the development of a statewide strategic plan, a 
comprehensive and unified approach among state agencies to deal with substance abuse. It has 
determined and documented that the state was budgeted during FY 1991-92 for substance abuse 
services valued at a minimum of $125.6 million. 

Mobilizing Connecticut 

Supported by a $50,000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation planning grant, "Mobilizing Connecti- 
cut" is CAD AC's new strategy to the reduction of substance abuse in Connecticut communities. It is 
based on the idea that the cause of the problem is not the grower, the trafficker, the pusher, or state 
or federal officials. Just as the cause of the problem lies in the attitudes and behavior of Connecticut's 
citizens and institutions, so does the solution. The program focuses on community institutions - 
particularly those that have not been involved or have been only marginally so - as potential agents 
of change in their respective environments, utilizing their own resources. "Mobilizing Connecticut" 
is based on the premise that the substance abuse problem can be reduced by drawing upon the vast 
energy and creativity of Connecticut's citizens and institutions to become part of the solution. 

"Mobilizing Connecticut" enlists the commitment of citizens and institutions to respond to the 
substance abuse problem by mobilizing communities collaborating at a regional level, mobilizing 
organizations not currently involved in the substance abuse problem, mobilizing societal systems, 
mobilizing the recovering community and mobilizing state government. 

Regional Action Councils 

Regional Action Councils in the Meriden/Wallingford and Stamford areas were developed this 
year, bringing the total to 13 of the 15 planned. A "key issues" workshop, the first step in developing 
a formal training program for the Regional Action Council network, was attended by board members 
and executive directors. 

Academic Partnership 

The new Academic Partnership with the University of Connecticut Health Center, Yale University 
School of Medicine and the University of Connecticut at Storrs has been formed to share resources, 
information, and training. It is seeking up to two million federal dollars for treatment need research, 
and plans to "transfer the technology" discovered in the institutions' research labs to CADAC 's 
program providers and vise versa. 

Training, Information and Certification 

The Connecticut Clearinghouse provides information about substance abuse and related subjects 
such as AIDS and teenage suicide. Patrons include students of all ages, parents, treatment providers, 
the business community, health care workers, prevention professionals, members of the criminal 
justice system, educators, police departments, health departments, Regional Action Councils, local 
action councils and the various professional organizations. Among the clearinghouse's activities, 
1,888 books and 4,557 video tapes were loaned and nearly 98,000 pamphlets and posters were given 
out in response to requests for information. Responding with information or referrals, clearinghouse 
staff handled 3,850 phone inquiries, nearly 3100 on-site visits, and nearly 200 written requests, 
totaling more than 7,000 requests. 

The CADAC Institute of Addictions provides opportunities to improve professional knowledge 
and skill to practitioners in the substance abuse field. This year, 2,096 people submitted 8,082 
applications for 184 courses available at the institute. Of these applicants, 963 were working toward 
professional certification. There were 1,354 employees of CADAC funded or managed programs and 
742 from other programs. Project for Addiction Counselor Training (PACT) is a training and career 
development project for entry-level addiction counselors, with priority given to individuals from 
minority groups and special populations. Funded through a grant from the US Office of Treatment 
Improvement (OTI), the 38-hour series of abbreviated certifiable counselor-related courses provides 



240 MENTAL HEALTH 



sufficient information to help participants decide if they want to further pursue counselor certification. 
The one round of training conducted to date resulted in many of the participants being interested in 
pursuing further training at the Institute of Addictions, at which they will receive priority consideration. 
More than 500 counselor certifications, re certifications and certification upgrades were issued this 
year by the Connecticut Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselor Certification Board. In addition, the 
board approved training events of other organizations for certification credit and established a 
minority outreach committee. 

Prevention, Intervention and Treatment 

Agency -operated facilities, Blue Hills Hospital in Hartford and Berkshire Woods, Boneski and 
Dutcher Treatment Centers in Newtown, Norwich and Middletown, respectively, have experienced 
significant staff reductions which challenged treatment capacity. To maintain appropriate staff/ 
patient ratios, 10 beds at Boneski and 24 beds at Dutcher were closed. A plan to close 30 beds at Blue 
Hills was narrowly averted with the passage of the governor's budget. The community, unions, staff, 
media and the agency administration successfully rallied to promote the beds remaining open. The 
facilities continued to provide both detoxification and rehabilitation for those with alcohol and other 
drug addictions. Total treatment capacity is 347 beds, 93 for detoxification and 254 for rehabilitation. 
Each facility admits approximately 2,000 patients per year with one-third on Physician's Emergency 
Certificate for a five day emergency detoxification commitment and approximately two-thirds 
voluntary admissions. Court committed patients to the rehabilitation units can require up to 60 percent 
of treatment capacity. 

In addition, among the facilities CADAC offers special programs for the mentally ill substance 
abuser, acupuncture for detoxification and treatment, a compulsive gambling treatment program 
recently transferred to CADAC from the Department of Mental Health, a relapse prevention program, 
a program for the deaf and hearing impaired, and educational services which enable clients without 
a high school diploma to study and take the GED exam. Among CADAC prevention and early 
intervention activities, the agency is responsible for the management and oversight of 26 grant-in-aid 
programs, local prevention council programs serving 165 towns, five drug -free schools projects and 
the Community Youth Activities Projects grant. Pursuant to passage of PA 91-298, a committee on 
substance abusing pregnant women and their children was named and activated. Findings and 
program recommendations will be issued in a final report in the Fall of 1992. Two new intensive 
outpatient programs to treat substance abusing pregnant women and their children opened - Project 
Courage in Bridgeport and Lifeline in New Britain. A 10-bed residential program in Hartford is being 
developed. Significant effort was devoted to the planning of treatment services for substance abusing 
pregnant women and their children. Objectives are to provide substance abuse treatment services to 
pregnant and post partum women; to increase the availability and accessibility of early intervention 
and treatment services for substance abusing pregnant women; to engage multiple organizations in 
the delivery of comprehensive services for substance using pregnant and post partum women, their 
infants and children; and to add capacity to provide substance abuse treatment at non substance abuse 
specific programs that already serve this population. 

The issue of increasing access to substance abuse services for women was addressed through the 
development of 12 action steps covering the areas of Program, Administration and Coordination, 
Collaboration with others in eliminating barriers, training and data collection, and sharing . Seven state 
agencies are cooperating to improve services to this special population. CADAC contracted with 
Oxford House, Inc. of Maryland to establish group homes in Connecticut for recovering substance 
abusers. CADAC also administers a $100,000 federal grant to provide money to recovering substance 
abusers seeking to establish a group residence. The program provides rental housing units, loans for 
security deposits and other expenses and organization of recovering persons to live together and share 
rental costs. This is a means of helping the recovering substance abuser to re-enter the community. 
The Court Liaison Service provides forensic evaluations for substance abusing offenders in the 
criminal courts. The program has grown dramatically since its inception in January 1989 from 614 
clients during the first six months to 1,832 this year - a 49.2 percent increase, annualized. In January 
1992, the program expanded through the utilization of a $200,000 grant ($150,000 federal, $50,000 
state). 

Consultation, training and technical assistance are available to the numerous agencies of the 
criminal justice system. Among them are formal relationships with the Office of Alternative 
Sanctions, the Prison and Jail Overcrowding Commission and the Narcotics Enforcement and Control 
Committee. CADAC also has provided training for the Public Defender's Office and the staff of 
Alternative Incarceration Centers, and has worked with the University of Connecticut School of 
Social Work and the Department of Psychiatry at John Dempsey Hospital in research concerning the 



MENTAL HEALTH 24 1 



substance abusing offender. C ADAC administers the Connecticut Pretrial Alcohol Education System 
(PAES), which provides alcohol counseling and education for individuals charged for the first time 
with operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. There are 17 PAES 
programs throughout the state that serve approximately 9,000 men and women each year. Victim 
Impact Panels (VIPs), a cooperative effort with Mothers Against Drunk Driving, brings PAES 
participants face-to-face with victims who tell of how their experiences have permanently changed 
their lives. CAD AC prepares budgets, monitors activities, provides technical assistance, and conducts 
monthly meetings for 13 HIV counseling and testing programs and 1 1 outreach programs with 20 
AIDS Risk Reduction Outreach Workers (ARROWS). It also coordinates testing and treatment for 
TB -positive clients in methadone programs, monitors and consults with four HIV symptomatic 
residences which accept homeless patients with substance abuse problems, and coordinates, administers 
and conducts HIV/ AIDS training at the CADAC Institute of Addictions and other sites. 

The new Program and Fiscal Monitoring Unit has expanded and improved program evaluation. All 
CADAC funded community-based programs received at least one on-site program evaluation, the 
scope of which ranged from basic contract compliance issues to the quality of the service delivery by 
the programs. Several new programs were established with the support and guidance of the 
monitoring unit. These included: a methadone maintenance outpatient program in New London, a 
residential intensive/intermediate program in Putnam, a triage and medical detoxification program in 
New Haven, and a multicultural ambulatory addiction services program targeting ethnic minorities 
in New Haven. CADAC volunteered to be one of the first state substance abuse agencies in the nation 
to be evaluated by the federal Office for Treatment Improvement. The preliminary findings are 
favorable. Approximately $35 million in grants were processed and monitored. The increase from FY 
1990-91 was due to federal grants awarded through the Office of Treatment Improvement for a case 
management program for public housing in the New Haven area and a statewide case management 
program for treatment of substance abusing adolescents. Preparations were made for the new federal 
audit requirements mandated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). A computer program 
to collect data on the Committed Youth Program was also initiated. 

Reorganization, Administration and Management Information 

To increase administrative efficiency during staff reduction, CADAC 's central office was 
reorganized this year into three main areas: Administrative Services; Planning, Coordination and 
Development; and Program Administration. These three divisions work together on most projects, 
thus encouraging the development of a more versatile staff of generalists. This reorganization has 
prepared CADAC for merger planning with the Department of Health Services, as they establish the 
Department of Public Health and Addiction Services mandated by the General Assembly(S A 92-20). 
The CADAC Personnel, Fiscal and Legal Services units merged to form the Administrative Services 
Division. A significant number of positions were lost as a result of attrition, early retirement and 
layoffs, parts of the over all effort to balance the budget. Often, the agency's new tasks required the 
remaining staff to change the focus of their responsibilities. Preparation began for developing the first 
biennial budget, as required by legislation passed by the 1992 General Assembly. CADAC fiscal staff 
monitored changes in the federal Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health (ADM ) Block Grant format 
to ensure CADAC 's compliance with new laws. 

Requirements of the new federally funded information system were derived from the needs of 
administrative, management and operational personnel and include considerations resulting from 
CADAC's impending merger with the Department of Health Services. The Steering Committee 
included both private sector and CADAC members and treatment as well as management personnel. 
As a result of many improvements in the present Client Information Collection System, information 
provided is, for the first time, current. The quality of the data is improved; the quantity has increased; 
and it is more readily available in usable form. Office automation now includes bulletin boards which 
contain substance abuse treatment and prevention research, grant announcements, and federal 
reporting requirements. CADAC achieved its equal employment opportunity and affirmative action 
goals for FY 1991-92. The consolidated Affirmative Action Plan submitted to the state Commission 
On Human Rights and Opportunities received approval based on substantial good faith efforts and 
goal achievement of 78 percent. Despite the extraordinary challenges of budget reductions, early 
retirements, layoffs and hiring freezes, the agency's full-time hiring included 19.1 percent African- 
Americans and 17.6 percent Hispanics. 



242 MENTAL HEALTH 




TRANSPORTATION 



Department of Transportation 

EMIL H. FRANKEL, Commissioner 

Nancy L. Hadley, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1969 Statutory authority - P.A. 89-768 

Central office - 24 Wolcott Hill Rd., Wethersfield, Conn. 06109 

Average number of full-time employees - 3731 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-1992 - 259,306,700 

Capital outlay - $867,700,000 

Organization structure - Office of Commissioner, Bureau of Aviation & Ports, 

Bureau of Finance and Administration, Bureau of Engineering & Highway 

Operations, Bureau of Policy & Planning, Bureau of Public 

Transportation, and State Traffic Commission. 




Doing more with less was the guiding theme of the department's operations in Fiscal Year 1992. 
While impacted by a substantial decrease in employees due to an early retirement program, 
going from an average of 4,228 full-time employees in Fiscal Year 1991 to 3,731 at year's end, the 
department successfully managed its business at a cost below the funds authorized in the 1991-92 
operating budget. 

The department introduced the "Total Quality Effort" process to its employees. This process is 
designed to improve customer satisfaction with the services provided by the department. 

As the main provider of public transportation services, rail and bus systems subsidized by the state 
carried nearly 63 million passengers. The subsidies for these services totalled $90 million. New buses 
were provided for fleets serving the New Haven, Hartford, Bridgeport, Naugatuck Valley, southeast 
Connecticut and Middletown areas. 

During the fiscal year, approximately $409. 1 million worth of construction work on highways was 
accomplished. There were 111 contracts completed, including work on 93 structures and 82.5 miles 
of highways. Bridge safety personnel inspected 3,262 bridges. A major safety improvement was the 
opening of the new Safety Inspection Trailer Weigh Station on 1-95 in Greenwich. 

Office of Affirmative Action 

The department is committed to affirmative action and equal opportunity in all operational areas 
and in all employment areas for both current and prospective employees pursuant to the State Code 
of Fair Practices and all other relevant state and federal laws and regulations. The Commission on 
Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO) and the Federal Highway Administration reviewed and 
approved the Department of Transportation affirmative action plan/program. The Affirmative Action 
Office handled 27 new discrimination complaints, closed 21 cases and provided information in five 
pending CHRO cases. The office staff prepared a sexual harassment brochure and is working on an 
upward mobility resource section for the agency library. There were five affirmative action training 
seminars conducted for 137 DOT supervisors. The 1991 Code of Fair Practices Survey was conducted 
with all units found in compliance. 

Office of Communication 

This office maintained daily contact with the news media, other public agencies and private citizens 
in the dissemination of information about transportation projects and various transit services 
supported by the department. 

Legislative Office 

This office coordinated all local legislative activities affecting the department: advising the 
commissioner on all legislative matters, distributing proposed legislation to personnel within the five 
departmental bureaus for review and preparation of testimony for public hearings and responding to 
legislators' requests and investigating their constituent concerns and problems. The Legislative 

244 



TRANSPORTATION 245 



Program Manager is the prime liaison for the department and attends various committee meetings and 
hearings. 

Office of Management Services 

The Office of Management Services conducted 24 management reviews and/or internal audits of 
operating units of the department. These resulted in 61 recommendations for improving productivity, 
efficiency and financial effectiveness of the department. In addition, it performed 983 security 
inspections and handled 150 security investigations. It also administered the DOT Library, the 
Identity Management Program and the Records Management Program. All activities performed by 
this office were performed in compliance with the Code of Fair Practices. 

State Traffic Commission 

The commission issued 100 town speed limit certificates, 95 permits for state signal installations 
and revisions, and 43 permits for town signal installations and revisions. In addition, 252 permits were 
issued to allow parades and special events to use state highways. Also, 1,943 permits were issued to 
allow service cars or wreckers to engage in service or towing operations on limited access state 
highways. The commission issued 8 1 certificates for the establishment or expansion of developments 
generating large volumes of traffic affecting public highways. 

Bureau of Aviation and Ports 

Richard H. Strauss, Deputy Commissioner 
The Bureau's Aviation Section is responsible for all activities at the six state -owned and state- 
maintained airports, as well as the licensing and regulating of 138 aviation facilities in the state. The 
bureau's Ports Section is responsible for Connecticut's navigable waters through the licensing of 
pilots and shipping agents. The Chester and Rocky Hill ferries and the State Pier in New London are 
included in the section's functions. 

Code of Fair Practices 

All offices of the Bureau of Aviation and Ports participated in the department's Code of Fair 
Practices monitoring survey and were in compliance during fiscal year 1991. 

Financial 

This office directed, coordinated and administered the annual Transportation Fund Operating 
Budget for general aviation and port functions. For fiscal year 1992, receipts were estimated at $1.7 
million while the operating expenses were estimated at $3.1 million. For fiscal year 1992, operating 
expenses at Bradley International Airport (Bradley) were estimated at $ 19.2 million; debt service was 
estimated at $11.3 million; while operating revenues were estimated at $30.9 million. 

Marketing and Development 

A non-profit organization named "Partners in Travel" was formed in an effort to aggressively 
market Bradley to inbound and outbound traffic sectors. The group has developed a number of goals 
aimed at increasing the usage of Bradley through an advertising campaign. 

Project Management Office 

During the past year, the Office of Project Management prepared design plans and specifications 
for the reconstruction of taxiways and ramps; expansion of the aircraft parking ramp at Bradley; 
reconstruction of a runway at Waterbury-Oxford Airport and the construction of a new taxiway 
parallel to the main runway at Windham Airport. The office oversaw the construction and completion 
during the past year of a new jet bridge, walkway repairs to the cargo ramp, reconstruction of the east 
side ramps and the reconstruction of Runway 15-33 at Bradley. 

Bradley International Airport 

Passenger volume at Bradley dropped 4.5 percent due to the weakened economy. Commuter 
service by TWExpress was reintroduced to Bradley's market, while United Express and US Air 
Express initiated service during the beginning of 1992. In addition, new nonstop service was 
inaugurated to Miami and Nashville by American Airlines to Orlando by United and by USAir to 
Tampa and West Palm Beach. Cargo shipments displayed a strong growth rate of 7.7 percent. The 
federally mandated key card access system was initiated by airport officials during March 1992. 
Bradley is the first airport in the New England region to install this type of security system. A new 
master plan for Bradley is currently being developed. 



246 TRANSPORTATION 



General Aviation Airports 

Activities at the five state -owned general aviation airports focused on forecasting the long-term 
needs of the airports, more specifically as follows: 

• Groton-New London Airport: A scope of services, to be performed by a consulting engineering 
company, is being prepared to update the 12-year old Airport Master Plan. The plan is supported and 
will be principally funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). 

• Waterbury-Oxford Airport: A totally new Airport Master Plan will be prepared and funded (90 
percent) by the FAA. 

• Hartford/Brainard Airport: The airport is in the process of incorporating the recommendations of 
the airport's Noise Compatibility Program (FAA Part 150). 

Office of Water Transportation 

The Office of Water Transportation oversees the operation of the State Pier at the Port of New 
London. During fiscal year 1992, 20 vessels from foreign countries called at the State Pier with 48, 837 
metric tons of cargo. Raw material imported into the State Pier included steel, wood pulp, copper and 
calcium chloride. Waste paper was exported from the State Pier to Indonesia. The Office of Water 
Transportation is responsible for the operations and maintenance of the Connecticut State Ferry 
Service at Rocky Hill and Chester/Hadlyme on the Connecticut River. In fiscal year 1992, the ferries 
transported 248,440 passengers and made 43,815 river crossings. The ferry service generated 
$206,075 to the Department of Transportation fund. The service is in operation from April 1 to 
November 30. During fiscal year 1992, $456,048 in revenue was generated by the Office of Water 
Transportation. 

Bureau of Engineering and Highway Operations 

James F. Sullivan, Deputy Commissioner 
Office of Chief Engineer 

This office managed the functional activities of the four major Bureau of Engineering and Highway 
Operations technical offices: Engineering, Construction, Maintenance and Highway Operations, and 
Rights of Way. The office also serves as the department's Emergency Management Control Center. 
A functional reorganization to coordinate engineering and construction functions for all modes was 
completed during the year. In addition, a Division of Highway Operations was established to increase 
the efficiency of our existing highway system. The Bureau of Engineering and Highway Operations 
complies with the Code of Fair Practices as monitored by the department's Code of Fair Practices 
Committee. 

Office of Fiscal/Special Projects 

This office, through its Scheduling and Financial Program Management Division and Business and 
Financial Services Division, coordinated the development, implementation, financial review and 
financial management of the Bureau of Engineering and Highway Operations '$391 .4 million Federal 
Aid Highway Program, $331 .5 million Highway Bond Program, $14.6 million Highway and Bridge 
Construction and Renewal Program and $94.7 million Operating Account Appropriation. The 
Highway Safety Division administered federal highway safety funds for a variety of highway safety- 
related activities. Driving under the influence of alcohol and other drugs (DUI) remained a priority 
issue, with over $550,000 in federal funds obligated to varying programs, including: 

• Law enforcement training courses, which resulted in the training of over 350 police (state and 
local) and Motor Vehicle Department (M VD) inspectors in the latest DUI detection and apprehension 
techniques. 

• An Administrative "Per Se" License Suspension Program, established at the MVD. In the second 
year of the program, 14,803 driving while intoxicated (DWI) arrests were processed; 13,183 (89.1 
percent) were for first offenses, while 1,620 (10.9 percent) were for repeat offenses. Of the 14,803 
arrests processed, 1,861 (12.3 percent) had operating privileges restored, while 12,912 (87.2percent) 
had their licenses suspended. 

In the Police Traffic Services area, federal funds in the amount of $226,000 were obligated to the 
Department of Public Safety's Division of State Police for enforcement of the state's 55 mph speed 
limit, and to the Municipal Police Training Council to conduct traffic enforcement training courses. 
Safety belt usage and enforcement continued as another priority area. 

Approximately $280,000 in federal funds was programmed to: 

• Conduct training for police (state and local) and campus security/police divisions, and to 
implement public information campaigns. 

• Continue local community traffic safety programs in Waterbury (health department), Stratford 



TRANSPORTATION 247 



(police department), and the main campus of UCONN at Storrs. 

The 1991 Connecticut Rider Education Program, utilizing $326,300 (a combination of motorcycle 
registration fees, state funds, federal highway safety monies and student registration fees) trained 
1,292 novice and experienced motorcycle riders in safe operating techniques. The federal Highway 
Administration's highway safety funded area included a "Statewide Work Zone Safety Materials 
Program", implemented with grant awards to 84 local municipalities for a total of $410,000. 

Office of Construction 

During Fiscal Year 1992, $409.1 million worth of construction was accomplished as determined 
by payment to contractors and 111 contracts totaling $323.1 million were completed, including 93 
structures and 82.5 miles of roadway. The Survey and Plans Units of the districts initiated the survey 
on 265 projects and completed the survey of 231 projects. Central Surveys performed an additional 
170 miles of geodetic work. Approval was granted for 236 Disadvantaged Business Enterprise 
subcontracts with a value of $30.8 million. 

The following are significant completed projects: new Charter Oak Bridge; western approaches 
(Rte.5 andl-91) to the Charter Oak Bridge; Dexter CoffinBridge; major widening of Route 3 inRocky 
Hill; major widening of 1-9 1 in Hartford; Ni antic River Bridge and its approaches ; bridge superstructure 
repairs in Greenwich; resurfacing of 1-95 in Milford; bridge restoration in Milford; reconstruction of 
Route 1 13 in Stratford; restoration of bridge Route 1-395 in Stratford; resurfacing of 1-95 inWestport; 
safety improvements on CT Route 8 - Litchfield to Torrington; new bridge U.S . 7 over the Housatonic 
River in New Milford; reconstruction of CT Route 4 in the vicinity of the UCONN Medical Facility 
in Farmington. 

The Office of Construction has also assumed the responsibility of the administration of the 
construction engineering/inspection phase of all railroad and vertical construction projects. These 
projects include; maintenance salt sheds for environmental site improvements; new maintenance 
facilities; additions to existing facilities; new railroad stations; the renovation, expansion and 
upgrading of existing facilities at the New Haven rail yard, including Union Station; the construction 
of a new building for rail equipment repair and also offices at the Stamford rail yard. 

The Office of Construction also includes the Divisions of Research and Materials Testing. Their 
accomplishments are as follows: 

• The staff of the Division of Materials Testing processed 60,495 reports devoted to the results of 
approximately 181,485 tests on construction and maintenance materials. 

• The Division of Research staff conducted and/or administered 24 research projects during 1991- 
92. 

Two reports were prepared for the State Legislature. Research staff prepared a report documenting 
work performed by a task force, established in September 1991 , to determine feasibility of increasing 
recycling activities in the department's construction and maintenance projects. A licensee was 
selected to market and manufacture the patented Narrow Connecticut Impact-Attenuation System 
(NCIAS) and Connecticut Impact-Attenuation System. Data and image gathering were performed on 
7,700 lane miles of state -maintained highways with the Division's two photolog vehicles. Division 
personnel maintained 12 photolog laser videodisc (PLV) viewing stations statewide. This data 
resulted in the state winning two lawsuits with an estimated value of $7 million, monies that the state 
would have to pay if the suits were decided for the plaintiffs. 

Office of Maintenance 

The Office of Maintenance provided roadway and roadside maintenance, including snow and ice 
control for 5,148 effective two-lane miles of roadway. Additional roadway surface, including snow 
and ice control, was served at 47 state agencies. Roadway surfaces totalling 343 miles were main- 
tained with applications as follows: 240 miles of vendor-applied bituminous concrete overlay; four 
miles of pavement leveling by state forces and 99 miles of liquid surface treatment. There were nine 
winter storms which required the use of 66,259 tons of chlorides and 166,147 cubic yards of sand 
abrasives. These were applied by 632 state trucks and 248 contracted trucks. 

The Traffic Services Units painted 8,917 miles of centerlines and lanelines; erected 4,558 new 
traffic regulatory, warning and directional signs; renewed or removed 12,875 existing signs; 
continued maintenance of 2,872 traffic signals and 836 miles of highway illumination and installed 
25 new traffic signals and 192 signal revisions. 

During the past year, the Office of Maintenance performed maintenance on approximately 563 
bridges through the combined efforts of department personnel and contractors. The office inspected 
3,262 bridges. 



248 TRANSPORTATION 



Office of Engineering 

The state Forces Design Division completed the design of 65 projects having a construction value 
of $104 million, including the design of four new bridges, 49 bridge rehabilitations and 150 two-lane 
miles for the 1992 Contract Resurfacing Program. This division also completed designs for two 
railroad facilities, renovation of a terminal and runway lighting at Bradley International Airport, with 
a total construction value of $60.1 million. 

The Geometries, Property and Permit Review Section provided 135 formalreviews of state projects 
plus uncounted informal reviews and 130 major traffic generator reviews, and processed 125 requests 
for work excess property and provided 10 special studies. 

The Computer Aided Design and Drafting Section provided computer control systems analysis, 
technical design, drafting, support and training to the department's CADD users. 

The Consultant Design Division completed design on 17 state road projects having a total 
construction value of $127 million, 17 local road projects having a total construction value of $25 
million and 63 bridge rehabilitation projects having a total construction value of $50 million. 

The Design Services Division was reorganized and now includes the Bridge Safety and Evaluation 
Section, the Soils and Foundation Section, the Pavement Management Section, the Utilities Section, 
the Contract Development/Cost Estimating Section, and the Hydraulics and Drainage Section. 

The Bridge Safety and Evaluation Section inspected 2,465 bridges, 536 structures carrying locally 
maintained roads off the federal- aid system and 255 bridges carrying state -maintained roads off the 
federal-aid system. A special project, inspecting over 2,200 local structures less then 20' in span 
length, was completed. 

The Soils and Foundations Section provided specialized geotechnical engineering services during 
the design and construction phases of the current Infrastructure Renewal Program. Special attention 
was required for the upgrading of 1-91 and the Founders Bridge, the approaches to the new Charter 
Oak Bridge and the 1-9 1/1-291 interchange. 

The Pavement Management Section provided in-depth pavement designs for rehabilitation, 
reconstruction and resurfacing projects. It also rated and evaluated nearly 5,200 sections of highways 
and produced the Annual Pavement Condition Report. 

The Utilities Section completed 212 agreements on 8 1 projects for preliminary engineering studies 
and utility adjustments required for construction and maintenance projects. In addition, 39 railroad 
agreements were prepared for 30 projects. 

The Contract Development/Cost Estimating Section processed 105 projects for advertising. Of 
these, 91 projects were designed for highway and bridge improvements, five projects were for airport 
improvements and nine projects were for vertical facilities and railroad improvements. The depart- 
ment was also able to secure over $13 million of Interstate Discretionary Funds, with the obligation 
of Project 132-97 (the Construction of 1-291, South Windsor/Manchester). Additionally, 99 fmal 
construction cost estimates, 20 preliminary construction cost estimates and 56 project agreement 
estimates were prepared. 

The Hydraulics and Drainage Section completed 27 hydrologic and hydraulic designs and provided 
coordination with the Department of Environmental Protection on flood plain management, inland/ 
wetland and water course permits. 

The Division of Environmental Compliance has completed 66 right-of-way screening investiga- 
tions in support of 46 transportation projects. Remedial Action Plans were prepared for four projects, 
and the Division managed 16 emergency responses in support of ongoing construction activities on 
1 1 projects. In addition, major groundwater and stormwater studies were completed at the New H aven 
Rail Yard and at Bradley International Airport. 

The Division of Traffic Engineering provided safety improvements on the state highway, federal- 
aid highway systems and local roads were emphasized by this office. Investigations were conducted 
at 91 high-frequency accident locations and improvements were recommended at 40 locations. 

The design of 107 traffic control signals and revisions were completed this past year. There are 10 
projects which are actively under construction in the rail-highway grade program. A total of 69 major 
traffic generators were reviewed for compliance with CGS-14-3 1 1 at the request of the State Traffic 
Commission. 

The Division of Traffic Engineering received 1 ,662 requests for traffic engineering investigations 
from citizens and federal, state and local offices. 

In order to comply with federal requirements relative to the state's certification of the 55 MPH 
speed limit program, approximately 935,000 vehicle speeds were recorded at 25 locations throughout 
the state. Computerized traffic control signal systems continue to be expanded throughout the state 
and are operational on 21 major arterials through 39 towns and cities, representing computer control 
of 425 traffic control signals. Design activities to upgrade illumination on approximately 30 miles of 



TRANSPORTATION 



249 



1-95 and 1-395 was completed. Construction will cost $8 million. 

A temporary motorist information system consisting of eight portable variable message signs has 
been installed in the 1-95 and Route 15 southwest corridor. The first phase of a long-term system 
consisting of 42 permanently located variable message signs will be operational in the fall of 1993. 
Design will continue on the remaining elements; closed circuit TV and vehicle detectors on 1-95 and 
Route 15, and upgrading the traffic signals and providing turn lanes on Route 1. 

Office of Rights of Way 

This office completed 672 acquisitions of real property for transportation projects at a cost of $22.8 
million- A total of 165 relocation payments were processed at a cost of $526,054. The Appraisal 
Division completed 435 appraisals. In addition, another 67 appraisals were completed for leases and 
sales of state land. The Property Management Division managed long- and short-term leases of 
highway property producing $1.9 million in rental income. Some 61 sales transactions were closed 
for a total income of $1 .2 million. 



Disadvantaged Business Enterprise, Women Business Enterprise 
QisadvantagedAVomen Business Enterprise — 1991*92 Statistics 



Category 



DBE 



WBE 



wwm 



Bureau of Finance and Administration 

James G. Gaston, Deputy Commissioner 
The Bureau of Finance and Administration provided administrative and support services to all 
bureaus and units in the department. All offices in the bureau participated in the department's Code 
of Fair Practices Monitoring Survey and were found to be in compliance. 

Office of Contract Compliance 

This office performed the external equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, disadvan- 
taged business enterprise, and on-the-job training compliance functions of the department for its 
capital projects. 

There were 740 affirmative action plans reviewed which were submitted by firms doing business 
with the department; 667 plans were approved. Approval of the remaining 73 plans is pending. 

There are 273 firms certified by the department as a disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE). This 
figure represents an increase of 29 certified firms from the previous fiscal year's total of 244. Table 
I breaks out these firms by trade category. The department has established a DBE set-aside goal of 
10 percent of the value of the contracts to be awarded in the fiscal year. There were 269 projects 

forecast to be scheduled 
for advertisement and 
award. These included 
1 68 projects with an esti- 
mated value of $435.5 
million which involved 
federal participation. 
Each was assigned a DB E 
goal, which amounted to 
$50.8 million (1 1.66 per- 
cent). The remaining 101 
projects with an esti- 
mated value of $216.7 
million were state funded 
and assigned a Small 

Business Enterprise (SBE) goal which amounted to $26.4 million (12.2 percent). Construction 
subcontracts awarded to DBEs in this fiscal year totaled $17.2 million (12.4 percent) of the value of 
the federally funded contracts. Construction subcontracts awarded to SBEs totalled $8.0 million (13.5 
percent) of the state funded contracts. 

The Office of Contract Compliance conducts an On-the-Job Training Program which emphasizes 
the recruitment and employment of minorities and females for occupations in the highway construc- 
tion industry. 

There were 161 individuals who started an On-the-Job Training Program. These included 1 07 (66.5 
percent) males and 54 (35.5 percent) females. The males were 28.0 percent (30) black; 56.1 percent 
(60) white; 15 percent (1 6) Hispanic and .9 percent ( 1 ) American Indian. The females were 26 percent 
(14) black and 74.1 percent (40) white. 

The annual survey of highway construction employment statistics disclosed 3,591 persons 
employed on highway construction projects in July 1991. This figure includes 3,417 (95.2 percent) 
males and 174 (4.9 percent) females. The males were 87.7 percent (2,995) white; 6.7 percent (239) 



Construction 

Construction supplier 

Construction manufacturer 

Construction service 

Consultant 

Non-construction supplier 

Non -construction service 

* Combined goals were eliminated in 1987 and the DBE/WBE 

figures are included in the WBE category 



63 


56 


6 


11 


3 


1 


6 


5 


5 


42 





3 


8 


12 



250 TRANSPORTATION 



black; 5 . 1 percent ( 1 82) Hispanic; .4 percent (13) American Indian; .3 percent ( 1 ) Asian. The females 
were 92 percent (160) white; .3 percent (1) American Indian. 

Division of Property and Facilities Services 

Effective March 1, 1992, the Office of Property Control, Concessions, Support Services and Claims 
were consolidated into the Division of Property and Facilities Services. This division coordinated and 
monitored vehicle usage, inventoried all department buildings and equipment, and maintained and 
repaired all facilities. The major administration buildings and other facilities' land and equipment 
were valued at $657 million. During the year, 2,735 repair orders were issued to address this 
responsibility. 

The Building Unit of this division replaced roofs at five facilities, replaced truck lifts at eight repair 
facilities, and constructed a replacement vehicle repair facility in West Willington. Through the 
Hazardous Waste Program, 19 underground fuel tanks were removed and/or replaced at 1 1 locations. 

The Office of Concessions administered contracts for the management of 10 restaurants, the 
Wethersfield Administration Building cafeteria and 23 gasoline stations, which are leased to private 
sector operators. 

Motor fuel sales amounted to 41,567,760 gallons, an increase of 2.81 percent from the prior year. 
Gasoline royalties were $4.6 million, restaurant royalties were $4.5 million, Mobil Mart royalties 
were $209,172 for total royalties of $9.3 million, which represents an overall increase of 2.81 percent 
in royalties. 

Division of Purchasing and Materials Management 

The Office of Purchasing and Stores was retitled to the Division of Purchasing and Materials 
Management. Additionally, all payment functions previously performed in purchasing were trans- 
ferred to the Division of Fiscal Services. Purchasing handled approximately 23,000 purchasing 
transactions and issued 2,400 agreements involving an estimated value of $80 million. Materials 
Management consolidated four warehouse operations into a new central warehouse facility in Rocky 
Hill and now operates a modernized central warehouse with 14 satellite facilities. The total value of 
materials dispersed to operating units was $12.4 million. Materials Management also directed 
operations of 1 17 gasoline/diesel stations and provided reports to the Office of Policy Management 
concerning fuel consumption. 

Office of Personnel 

The Personnel Division coordinated and implemented all activities related to the State Employees 
Bargaining Agent Coalition Agreement including furloughs, agency closing days, Voluntary Leave, 
layoffs and reemployments, and the Early Retirement Incentive Program under which over 400 
employees retired. The division also assisted top management in implementing an agency consoli- 
dation/reorganization designed to become more effective with a smaller work force. 

The Training Division continued its broad program of in-service training for departmental 
employees covering administrative, supervisory, technical topics and management development. A 
special training program has been developed to assist DOT truck drivers in obtaining their federally 
required commercial drivers' licenses. The Division of Safety continued its program of in-house 
OSHA compliance inspections to permit the department to meet its responsibilities under the federal 
and state Occupational Safety and Health Acts. 

Office of Fiscal Services 

This office prepared and managed the Transportation Fund Budget, processed all payrolls, 
maintained accounting records, prepared all required financial reports, maximized the use of Federal 
Highway Administration funds and coordinated the department's monthly requests to the state Bond 
Commission for bond allocations to finance the capital transportation projects, including requests of 
$419.5 million for the eighth year of the Governor's Infrastructure Renewal Program. 

The Accounts Receivable Division collected $21.3 million. The Accounts Payable Division 
processed 9,991 payment lists consisting of 58,291 vouchers for payment of obligations. The Payroll 
Division processed 53 payrolls during the year that amounted to $136.9 million. 

The division of Project Cost Control provided fiscal control of the Capital Program. It also was 
responsible for the allocation of bonds, the allotment of all state and federal funds and the control of 
program costs through the issuance of project initiation and modification memoranda and the 
approval of all work orders. 

The Federal-aid Division administered activities necessary to obtain the required approvals from 
the Federal Highway Administration for the authorization of Federal-aid Highway Program funds for 



TRANSPORTATION 251 



financing projects in the department's Capital Highway Transportation Program. During fiscal year 
1992, a total of $144.1 million of federal-aid funds were authorized for various highway projects and 
$466.6 million was billed and reimbursed to the department from various federal agencies. 

Division of Contract Administration 

Effective March 1, 1992, the Office of Documents Processing was retitled to the Division of 
Contract Administration. This division administered legal claims, agreements, consultants' and 
contracting engineers' negotiations and contract award functions, and is comprised of the Claims, 
Agreements, Negotiations and Contracts Sections. 

The Claims Section was reassigned to the Division of Property and Facilities Services on May 1, 
1992. Prior to reassignment, the Claims Section processed 1,109 claims under the department's 
highway, fleet, airport, ferry and commuter parking liability insurance policies; coordinated 58 
investigations of claims before the Claims Commissioner, and submitted reports on each to the 
Attorney General's Office. The Agreements Section reviewed and processed a total of 679 agree- 
ments and leases, including 1 1 agreements, 95 supplemental agreements and 34 extra work claims 
with consultants and contracting engineers. The total dollar value of the consultants' and contracting 
engineers' agreements negotiated was $54.2 million. The Contracts Section awarded 149 construc- 
tion contracts totalling $28 1 .5 million. 

Office of Audits 

A total of 517 project audits valued at approximately $137 million were performed with $7.9 
million in adjustments made in favor of the state. In addition, 109 audits of consulting engineers' 
burden, fringe and overhead rates were performed on companies with a combined direct labor of $950 
million. 

Office of Information Services 

This office, through the combined efforts of the Divisions of Business Systems, Operational 
Systems, Policy & Development, and Graphics Systems, provides departmental policy direction on 
information technology, computer mainframe and telecommunications resources, technology sup- 
port and related services to all department units. The Unisys 1100/92 MOD.l computer system 
supports a network of 700+ remote terminal and personal computer stations which communicate with 
the mainframe and peripheral equipment. A Unysis U600/UNIX System has been installed to upgrade 
the department's data entry capabilities. Expansion of our micro networking capacity is currently 
taking place and is showcased by an Executive Local Area Network that serves essentially senior level 
managers. In concert with this executive network, an Electronic Mailing System has been established 
that also provides the department with a linkage to the Federal Highway Administration. A statewide 
communication link is also being developed to integrate the department's varied systems to provide 
more timely accessibility to distributed data in a singular fashion. 

Bureau of Policy and Planning 

Michael T. Saunders, Deputy Commissioner 
Office of Policy 
The Office of Policy has been developing policies and procedures to implement a program of 
transportation improvements that meet the requirements of the Intermodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act (ISTEA) and the Clean Air Act. The 1992 Master Transportation Plan was also 
prepared and distributed. Financial analyses were conducted to monitor expenditures, project 
revenues and maintain a record of transportation fund appropriations and actual expenditures. The 
Systems Evaluation unit has kept the project and financial status of the Interstate Trade-In Program 
current and has been involved in the implementation of improvements along the major corridors. The 
Office of Planning is responsible for three major operating divisions: Inventory and Forecasting, 
Intermodal Planning and Environmental Planning. 

Division of Transportation Inventory and Forecasting 

The Planning Inventory and Data Division supplied roadway traffic volumes, accidents and 
systems associated with the 20,124 miles of state and local public roadway in Connecticut. These 
statistics are utilized for the development of programs and projects to provide improved safety 
services to the traveling public. In addition, a portable weigh-in-motion system and sensors implanted 
in roadways are used to collect information relative to the weight of the trucks using state roadways. 

The Division of Forecasting prepared detailed traffic forecasts for 14 highway projects, as well as 
travel statistics for many other purposes. The travel simulation models were revised to provide travel 



252 TRANSPORTATION 



forecast data to comply with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. A Geographic Information 
System (GIS) is being developed and will include socio-economic data at the town level and town sub- 
area and the state highway system with access to the department's inventory files. 

Division of Intermodal Planning 

The Airport Planning Unit provided direct support to the Bureau of Aviation and Ports in the areas 
of facilities planning, operational analysis and policy at state, municipal and private airports. This 
activity included review of third party proposals for airport development, as well as recommendations 
for the efficient use of existing facilities. 

Work on the Bradley International Airport Master Plan is approximately 50 percent finished and 
is scheduled to be completed and sent to the Federal Aviation Administration forreview in April 1993. 

The Transit Planning Unit, in response to Special Act 91-20, completed three studies concerning 
the feasibility of implementing commuter rail service between Hartford and Enfield, between 
Hartford and Waterbury; and in Eastern Connecticut. The transportation component of the Stripper 
Well Petroleum Rebate Program totaling 4.3 million dollars has been committed to 65 projects. There 
are 61 projects completed, with the balance to be finished by December 31, 1991. Transit Planning 
continues to administer, plan, expand and maintain a statewide network of commuter parking 
facilities. The Connecticut commuter parking program currently consists of 225 parking facilities 
totaling approximately 29,000 parking spaces. There are seven projects currently under way to 
provide for an additional 1,100 spaces. The Transit Planning Unit continued to work with the 
Greenwich and Norwalk Transportation Management Organizations (TMO) in a public/private effort 
to promote public transportation and ridesharing. 

The Special Studies Unit, in response to Special Act 90-1, completed a study of state Route 195 
between 1-84 and the University of Connecticut. The purpose of this study was to determine the best 
way to maintain acceptable levels of service on this route with minimal community disruption during 
the next 20 years. Special Studies is also administering a study to determine the optimal way to provide 
access to and distribution within downtown Hartford for high occupancy vehicles. 

A Port Planning Unit was created in January of 1992 to provide planning support for the Bureau 
of Aviation and Ports. The primary objective of Port Planning is to develop public policy for 
transportation investments in Connecticut port areas. The Port Planning section is participating in a 
Port of Connecticut Study to assess the transportation infrastructure for the major ports in Connecti- 
cut. Port Planning is working with the Department of Economic Development and the Bureau of 
Aviation and Ports to establish policy relative to the regional economic development role of the major 
ports . Once the transportation infrastructure has been assessed, the study team will prepare long-range 
capital development goals for public funding of proposed transportation related port improvements. 

The Liaison Unit worked closely with the Metropolitan and Regional Planning Organizations to 
obtain local endorsement of Transportation Improvement Programs, a necessary step in securing 
federal funding for transportation improvements. 

The Highway Planning Unit prepared the required documentation for Federal Highway Adminis- 
tration approval for new access at Exit 34 on Interstate 84 in Plainville. This approval was a major 
milestone towards the construction of the three million square-foot Plainville Mall. In addition, this 
Unit has worked closely with the Department of Economic Development to develop transportation 
improvement concepts which would enhance the development potential of various areas in the state. 
Several design layouts were developed by the Unit, including a Brookfield Center Bypass concept for 
the Route 7 project, from Brookfield to New Milford, and a concept for the reconstruction of the Route 
2/Route 32 Interchange in Norwich. The Highway Planning Unit is also responsible for the 
coordination and planning of bicycle paths in the state. The Unit developed the bicycle path to be 
constructed along Interstate 291 in Manchester, and has been working closely with the Connecticut 
Coalition of Bicyclists to develop a new state bicycle map. 

Division of Environmental Planning 

The Office of Environmental Planning continued the preparation of Environmental Documents for 
several major transportation projects, including the Southern Connecticut Environmental Impact 
Statement (EIS), the Route 25 EIS (Trumbull-Newtown), the Route 7 Final Environmental Impact 
Evaluation (EIE) (Brookfield-New Milford), the Route 20/75 Final EIE in Suffield, Route 9 in 
Middletown (EIS), 1-95 over New Haven Harbor ("Q" Bridge) (Draft EIS), the Prospect Street By- 
pass (East Hartford) (Draft EIS) and improvements to Route 6 east of Windham, and Route 6, Bolton 
to Windham (EIS). 

The Connecticut Legislature appropriated $10 million in the 1987 (Public Act 86-391) and 1988 



TRANSPORTATION 253 



(Special Act 87-42) fiscal years for the Retrofit Noise Barrier Program. The S 10 million funding has 
allowed the department to address the first 15 ranked barrier locations on the program priority list. 
Additional funding for the retrofit noise barriers was provided through Special Acts 87-76, 88-73, 89- 
50 and 90-1 for specified locations. Approximately 41 locations on the Retrofit Program priority 
listing are being addressed through legislative action or in conjunction with major expressway 
projects (using federal funds). Approximately $30 million has been applied to this program to date. 

In addition, noise analyses have been conducted for proposed transportation projects, and noise 
barrier designs have been completed for major expressway projects supported with federal funds. 

Indirect source air quality permits have been obtained for a number of major state roadway projects 
allowing these projects to proceed to construction. An extensive amount of coordination has also been 
undertaken with the U.S. EPA and regional groups in developing a plan of action to address the 
requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. 

Inland wetland permits were obtained for the following major projects: 1-91/3 - Wethers field, 
Cottage Grove Road, Bloomfield, and Founders Bridge, Hartford. Approximately 25 other wetland 
applications have been reviewed and submitted to the Department of Environmental Protection in the 
last year. Over 40 other projects have had wetland delineations and functional assessments prepared. 
In-depth environmental reviews have been completed for over 110 projects in the past 12 months and 
15 wetland applications reviewed for other bureaus. A 400-acre site was delineated at the University 
of Connecticut for the Department of Public Works by the department. 

The department has completed the construction of three major wetland creation/enhancement/ 
restoration sites totalling approximately 21 acres. 

Civil Rights and Affirmative Action 

During Fiscal Year 1992, 24 bureau projects were reported to the department's DBE Screening 
Committee, which determined appropriate DBE percentage goals for each project. Additional 
miscellaneous Title VI information was supplied periodically to both UMTA and the FHWA. 

The bureau submitted its quarterly reports of DBE/WBE awards and commitments to the Office 
of Contract Compliance. 

The bureau 's Civil Rights Coordinator also participated in the monthly meetings of the department's 
DBE/WBE Certification Panel. During Fiscal Year 1992, approximately 160 applications from 
different businesses seeking DBE or WBE certification from the department were reviewed. 

Bureau of Public Transportation 

Patricia Zedalis, Deputy Commissioner 
This bureau is responsible for the development, maintenance and operation of a safe and efficient 
system of motor carrier and rail facilities for the movement of people and goods. 

Office of Rail 

A Federal Transit Administration (FT A) Section 3 grant in the amount of $22.7 million was 
awarded to the Connecticut Department of Transportation in September 1991. This grant, which was 
matched by $7.6 million in state funds, was awarded to effect specific New Haven Rail Line 
improvements including the rehabilitation of the West River Bridge, mainline track improvements 
and the reconfiguration and signalization of the New Haven yard interlocking. 

On December 30, 1991, the department submitted a Fiscal Year 1992 Section 3 grant application 
to the FTA for funds to effect the construction of a New Haven Rail Line maintenance of equipment 
and rail car storage facility at Stamford. On April 27, 1992, the FTA awarded a grant in the amount 
of $28.1 million for this purpose. A state match of S8.8 million was needed to fully fund this project. 

In June 1992, another application was made to the FTA for first year funding and advance 
construction authority to begin the S104.8 million PECK moveable bridge and viaduct replacement 
project on the New Haven Rail Line in Bridgeport. The department applied for S 17.7 million through 
the Congestion Mitigation/Air Quality Program, established under the Intermodal Surface Transpor- 
tation Efficiency Act of 1991, for the fust year funding of the PECK moveable bridge replacement 
project. The advance construction authority is a mechanism within the FTA guidelines that permits 
FTA to commit to fully fund the project in subsequent years limited only by its Congressional 
appropriation. A six -year duration is anticipated for this project. 

Connecticut ridership on the New Haven Rail Line for Calendar Year 1992 was $16 million. The 
state share of the deficit associated with the operation of the New Haven Rail Line for Fiscal Year 1992 
was $32.9 million. The Shore Line East commuter rail service successfully completed its second full 
year of revenue operation on June 30, 1992. The service continues to operate between Old Saybrook 
and New Haven, with intermediate stops at Westbrook, Clinton, Madison, Guilford and Branford. In 



254 TRANSPORTATION 



Calendar Year 1991 the average weekday ridership (no weekend service is provided) was 1,006, 
which produced an annual ridership of 254,37 1 . The total deficit associated with the provision of this 
service in Calendar Year 1991 was $5 million. Four revenue trains have been added to the Shore Line 
East service over the past year, bringing the total number of revenue trains to 14 per day. In the fall 
of 1992, the department is planning to assess the demand for reverse commutation service by 
converting six deadhead (non-revenue) trains into revenue trains. 

Office of Transit and Ridesharing 

This office manages all aspects of bus transit operations, maintenance and improvements, 
rideshares programs in the state, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as it relates to fixed- 
route public transportation. In Fiscal Year 1992, the state provided a total of $52 million for the 
operation of commuter and local bus service. Transit ridership in the state totaled 36 million. 

Connecticut Transit, the state-owned bus system, provided commuter and local bus service in the 
Hartford, New Haven and Stamford urban areas. On March 23, 1992, Connecticut Transit initiated 
interstate local bus service between Greenwich, Connecticut and Port Chester, New York. Local bus 
service is also provided in the Bristol, Meriden, New Britain, Waterbury and Wallingford areas by 
contract with private operators. The state is providing operating subsidies and capital grants to transit 
districts for vehicle purchases and facility construction in Bridgeport, Middletown, Milford, Norwalk, 
the Southeast are (Norwich/New London/Groton), the Valley area (Derby/Ansonia/Seymour/Shelton), 
Westport, the Housatonic area (Danbury), Windham, Estuary, Northeastern and Northwestern 
Connecticut. 

During Fiscal Year 1 992, the department took delivery of 1 02 new lift-equipped replacement buses 
for the Hartford and New Haven divisions of Connecticut Transit. New buses were also purchased 
for the Bridgeport, Valley, Southeast area and Middletown. The purchase and rehabilitation of a bus 
garage was initiated for the Housatonic Area (Danbury) Transit District. A contract was awarded for 
the design of the New Haven transit facility. Ridesharing activities in the state are operated by 
Rideshare Company in Hartford, Rideworks in New Haven, and MetroPool in Stamford. A 
transportation management association (TMA) was initiated in Bridgeport. This new TMA will be 
a satellite office of MetroPool. MetroPool initiated commuter bus/rail service in Greenwich. The 
Rideshare Company, Inc. 's major company vanpool fleets are under its management. Federal capital 
grants totaling $32.4 million were awarded during Fiscal Year 1992 for the purchase of buses for 
Waterbury and Connecticut Transit. 

Office of Motor Transport Services 

This office is responsible for issuing permits for the movement of oversize/overweight vehicles and 
loads and for the movement of radioactive materials over roadways of the state. In Fiscal Year 1992, 
a total of 61,946 permits were issued for the movement of oversize/overweight vehicles and a total 
of $1.6 million was collected in permit fees. The issuance of 583 permits for the transport of 
radioactive materials during Fiscal Year 1992 resulted in an additional $14,575 in permit fees. The 
regulations unit oversees all for hire, property (trucking) andpassenger (motor bus, taxicab and livery) 
operators and rail regulatory matters. During the past year, a total of 166 applications were filled, of 
which 92 were approved, 18 were denied or withdrawn and 56 are pending. 

Office of Fiscal and Administrative 

The Fiscal and Administrative Office provides the fiscal and administrative support for the bureau. 
Approximately 311 agreements were processed with bus service and rail freight operators, consult- 
ants and various supporting services in Fiscal Year 1992. During Fiscal Year 1992, this office was 
responsible for issuing 327,345 permit stamps to motor carriers of property for hire for which a total 
of $4.2 million was collected, hi addition, 2,138 registrations were issued which provided $56,660 
in revenue. 

Code of Fair Practices 

The Bureau of Public Transportation continues to progress positively in its Code of Fair Practices 
activities. Working closely with the Affirmative Action Office, the bureau has been able to recognize 
and address areas of under utilization within its units. All managers involved in the hiring process in 
Fiscal Year 1992 have been aware of the bureau's commitment to correct instances of under- 
utilization. 




ENVIRONMENTAL 
PROTECTION 



Department of Environmental Protection 

TIMOTHY R. E. KEENEY, Commissioner 
Thomas J. Dudchik, Deputy Commissioner, Conservation/Preservation 
Robert E. Moore, Deputy Commissioner, Environmental Quality 
Established - 1971 Statutory authority - P.A. 872, 1971 
Central office - State Office Building, Hartford, Conn. 06106 
Average number of full-time employees - 1,213 
Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $69,893,483 
Capital outlay - $1,560,641 
Organization Structure - Office of Commissioner; Bureau of Environmental 
Services: Natural Resources, Education and Publications; Bureau of Administra- 
tion; Branch of Environmental Conservation; Branch of Environmental Quality; 
and Bureau of Air Management 




It is the mission of the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to conserve, improve, and 
protect the natural resources and environment of the State of Connecticut; to control air, land, 
and water pollution in order to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the people of Connecticut; 
and to preserve and enhance the quality of life for present and future generations. 

Office of the Commissioner 
Communications and Environmental Review 

Communication's staff provides internal and external communications and public awareness 
programs for the agency. Staff handles major media and public inquiries, assists the commissioner 
in disseminating information to the public, staff, legislature and other agencies, and provides direct 
communication services via program brochures, park maps and general publications. Some items 
prepared included news releases, editorial responses, weekly fishing advisories, an internal newslet- 
ter, agency activity calendar, park and camping maps, fact sheets, brochures, informational materials 
and news conferences. 

Fiscal Year 1991-92 (FY92) included the 25th anniversary of Connecticut's passage of the Clean 
Water Act, paving the way for a similar federal act to follow five years later. DEP focused a full 
celebration on the Year of Clean Water through special events, Official Statements and fact sheets 
highlighting the history of the state's major rivers and chronicling their cleanup progress. 

The Environmental Review unit conducts reviews including environmental impact statements, 
applications for federal assistance, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Connecticut Siting 
Council (CSC) applications. It oversees agency activities under the Connecticut Environmental 
Policy Act (CEPA) and participates as the commissioner's designee on the CSC, the Public 
Transportation Commission and the Energy Advisory Board. 

Staff reviewed 92 applications for federal assistance, 12notices of direct federal activity, 13 natural 
gas pipeline and hydroelectric proposals, seven industrial and business development proposals, 1 1 
CSC applications, 32 CEPA documents and 12 national Environmental Policy Act documents. The 
office also reviewed projects financed under the federal Community Development Block Grant 
Program and the Small Cities Program. 

Office of Long Island Sound Programs (OLISP) 

Arthur Rocque, Assistant Commissioner 
OLISP is responsible for the DEP's Long Island Sound (LIS) activities. OLISP coordinates agency 
policies and programs impacting Long Island Sound and related coastal lands and waters and ensures 
that the use, protection and quality of coastal land and water resources is consistent with statutory 
coastal policies and the state's proprietary and public trust interest in its submerged lands and coastal 
waters. 

256 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 257 

The office is responsible for statewide implementation of Connecticut's coastal management 
program, permitting coastal development in the state's tidal, coastal and navigable waters, protection 
and restoration of the state's tidal wetlands and coastal coves and embayments, administration and 
oversight of the sand and gravel marine mining permitting program and the state Harbor Management 
Act, oversight of dredging and dredged material disposal in tidal waters, and long range planning for 
programs and initiatives affecting LIS. 

In FY92 OLISP wrote legislation, and coordinated and developed a bill for a proposed Long Island 
Sound license plate. The bill, signed into law by Governor Weicker, authorized the Department of 
Motor Vehicles to issue an LIS license plate depicting the Connecticut coastline with a lighthouse and 
beach grass; "Preserve the Sound" is centered beneath the ID numbers. Proceeds will benefit a 
dedicated LIS fund administered by DEP. The fund will support fisheries research, restoration and 
rehabilitation of tidal wetlands and estuarine embayments, aquatic wildlife research, habitat preservation 
and restoration, research grants and public outreach. 

OLISP received federal funds from the Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management to 
support projects of the Coastal Management Program. Included are a tidal wetlands restoration and 
compensation program; development of a general permit for minor, non-impacting tidal wetland 
activities; development of regulations to implement the structures, dredging and fill program and a 
coastal boundary evaluation project. 

The Coastal Permitting Section processed 136 permit applications for work in tidal wetlands and/ 
or coastal, tidal or navigable waters; 78 permits were issued. OLISP processed 132 applications for 
Certificates of Permission; 110 Certificates were issued. 

Complaints of potential violations of the coastal permitting statutes numbered 90. There were 74 
sites inspected, and 10 enforcement orders were issued. Penalties of $39,000 were assessed on 
enforcement orders. 

Continued federal certification of the Coastal Management Program entitled OLISP to a federal 
grant of $767,000 for program implementation. Under the program 694 coastal site plans were 
reviewed by the 33 coastal municipalities. Coastal programs have been completed voluntarily by 29 
of the 33 coastal municipalities. Harbor management plans were prepared by 19 communities under 
Connecticut's Harbor Management Act, two approved plans were implemented. 

OLISP provides extensive technical assistance to coastal towns and other DEP units. In FY92 staff 
provided, reviewed and commented to coastal municipalities on 140 coastal development and 175 
coastal zone change proposals. Staff speakers and support were provided to the three Long Island 
Sound Regional Advisory Councils, the Bi-State Long Island Sound Marine Resources Committee 
and to the Coastal Embayment Advisory Board. 

Affirmative Action 

The office of Affirmative Action advances the principles and practice of equal opportunity in 
employment, services and contract administration; ensures compliance with civil rights laws and 
regulations; and promotes the employment, development and effective management of diverse 
human resources for optimum program effectiveness and quality services to the public. 

The affirmative action administrator reports to the commissioner and coordinates the affirmative 
action and contract compliance programs. Affirmative action progress was limited by the hiring 
freeze, but 54 minority seasonal staff were hired, twice as many as last year. The department initiated 
an Urban Environmental Education/Career Development Program to introduce environmental 
concepts, develop environmental awareness and promote interest in environmental careers among 
minority youths. 

Office of Adjudications 

Adjudications handled over 60 contested cases involving permit applications and appeals of 
enforcement orders. More than 30 decisions were issued, including proposed decisions in permit 
cases, for the commissioner's review, and final decisions in order cases appealable only to the superior 
court. 

Bureau of Environmental Services 

The Bureau of Environmental Services includes the Bureau Chief/Program Development Office, 
Education and Technical Publications and the Natural Resources Center. 

Program Development: Program Development supports Environment 2000 (E/2000), the state's 
environmental plan, coordinates DEP's Strategic plans, develops Rivers Management Programs, 
coordinates annual Earth Day activities and prepares Distinguished Service Awards. 

The E/2000 plan provides for environmentally sound economic growth for Connecticut. Per Conn. 



258 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

Gen. Statutes 22a-8, E/2000 underwent its first five-year revision, a public participation process 
spanning 15 months. Draft revisions were provided to environmental organizations, businesses, 
industries and public interest groups for comment. Input was obtained through statewide public 
meetings and the annual statewide E/2000 conference. The revised plan retained 29 of 42 original 
issues, focused four concerns into two and developed 21 emerging issues and goals. The plan now 
identifies 52 environmentally critical issues and highlights goals and strategies for each. 

A rivers management consultant was hired to assist on an assessment of rivers and streams, and 
developed an automated rivers data management system. A Directory of River Conservation 
Organizations and a newsletter were published. The Rivers Program was represented at 25 events 
statewide. Rivers Advisory Committee members and DEP staff completed a report identifying issues 
to be addressed in developing a rivers management program; identified preliminary management 
strategies and began drafting specific recommendations for a river corridor management program. 
Staff provided support for the Farmington River Wild and Scenic Study and the Farmington River's 
Instream Flow Study. 

The Education and Publications unit reviews and disseminates curriculums and trains educators. 
It published and sold technical documents generated by the Natural Resources Center and the U.S. 
Geological Survey. 

An additional 2,500 educators were introduced to Project WILD, Project Learning Tree, and WILD 
Aquatic programs. The SEARCH program involved teachers and students in environmental moni- 
toring and research. Land use education programs were delivered to municipal officials. 

Map and publication sales generated $95,000 from wholesale and retail purchases. 

The Natural Resources Center produces, interprets and collates baseline data and manages selected 
natural resource elements. It is a library for natural resource information and coordinates and manages 
natural resource data collection and monitoring programs. 

The Geological and Natural History Survey (GNHS) section implements statewide natural 
resource monitoring, inventories and interprets aerial photography, topographic maps and other data. 
It monitors surface and groundwater, precipitation, earthquake seismicity; and maintains a natural 
diversity data base. 

GNHS conducted seismic surveys and bottom sampling of Long Island Sound; tested radon in 
water supply wells; maintained monitoring networks for water quality, precipitation, stream flow, 
flood-stage and groundwater levels; initiated a statewide sand and gravel aggregate inventory in 
cooperation with the New England Governors' Conference, and operated the Natural Diversity Data 
Base (NDDB) of endangered and threatened species. The NDDB evaluated 1,21 1 sites and assisted 
other agencies and conservation groups in evaluations. 

The Geographic Information System (GIS) develops and maintains cartographic data, produces 
cartographic materials for publishing natural resource maps, and develops GIS applications. 

GIS acquired statewide surficial materials digital coverage; improved hydrography data coverage; 
initiated a data distribution program; developed digital data standards, completed digitizing level "B" 
aquifer maps and began distribution to towns; and continued to automate soil maps. Special projects 
included a two-year GIS data program with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S . 
EPA) and the DEP's Site Remediation and Closure Division; completion of a digital land use/cover 
inventory and initiation of planning for agency-wide access to the digital map system. 

Bureau of Administration 

Administration develops, enhances, and manages administrative services which support environ- 
mental quality, conservation and central office programs to ensure that the agency operates within 
administrative statutes, regulations, policies and guidelines. 

The Financial Services Division consists of budget, grants, accounts payable and receivable. 
Responsibilities include managing the operating and capital budgets; all funds including general 
funds, federal funds, bond funds, special or dedicated funds and trust funds; and licensing and permit 
fee collection programs. 

The Agency Support Services Division consists of purchasing, inventory and warehousing, data 
processing, telecommunications engineering, dispatch office, and management analysis. Responsi- 
bilities include managing agency procurement; shipping and receiving; inventory and warehouse 
operation; saw mill, sign shop and fleet operation; telecommunications engineering; 24-hour agency 
dispatch operations; management analysis; and data processing for the Central Office and Branch of 
Environmental Conservation. 

The Human Resources Division consists of personnel services, payroll, time and attendance. 
Responsibilities include recruitment, selection and retention programs; personnel administration; 
personnel development; benefits administration; labor relations; contract administration; payroll and 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 259 

attendance/activity tracking systems. 

The Office of the Permits Assistance Ombudsman provides a central source of information for 
business, industry and the public regarding DEP permits, approvals or other authorizations for 
regulated activities or the permitting process in general. 

Branch of Environmental Conservation 

Thomas J. Dudchik, Deputy Commissioner 
Bureau of Natural Resources 

The Bureau of Natural Resources is responsible for the management of the state's fisheries, forest 
and wildlife resources, the enforcement of conservation and recreation laws and regulations, and the 
administration of the Office of Indian Affairs. 

Division of Fisheries 

The Fisheries Division manages, conserves and enhances fish populations through Inland and 
Marine Fisheries Programs. Inland Fisheries' Fish Culture and Distribution Program distributed 
733,051 "catchable" trout into 80 lakes and ponds, and 290 rivers and streams. Approximately 3 
million trout, kokanee salmon, and Atlantic salmon fry and eggs were produced and distributed. Data 
was collected from rivers, lakes, and reservoirs to monitor fish populations and evaluate regulations. 

Northern Pike spawning marshes on the Connecticut River and Bantam Lake produced 1 8,000 and 
2,000 juvenile northern pike, respectively, and staff restocked them into these waters and Mansfield 
Hollow Reservoir. 

The Connecticut Aquatic Resources Education Program (CARE) had increased participation for 
the fifth consecutive year. Over 200 volunteer instructors taught CARE classes, clinics and workshops 
which included conservation, safety and ecology lessons. Students increased to over 4,000, totaling 
over 10,000 since the program began in 1986. 

Marine Fisheries manages finfish and Crustacea in LIS and its coastal rivers and streams. In FY92 
the DEP's "Marine Resource Survey" continued to monitor the condition of fish stocks. The FY92 
"Summer Survey" defmed relationships between seasonal hypoxia and finfish. Surveys of Juvenile 
winter flounder improved DEP's understanding of the species and its habitat. 

The American Lobster Study provided larval, juvenile, and adult indices needed to manage the 
species, and a lobster kill of unknown magnitude was investigated. 

A Marine Angler Survey collected harvest information and provided data on angling efforts and 
species harvests. 

Anadromous Fisheries Restoration and Enhancement. The project monitored the adult salmon run 
in the Connecticut River and trapped 111 salmon and transported them to a holding facility for fall 
spawning. Staff stocked juvenile salmon and salmon fry into two state rivers. The program also 
monitored shad and conducted a survey of Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon stocks in the Connecticut 
River. 

Interjurisdictional Fisheries Management. Staff conducted analyses and management planning on 
migratory or transboundary species. Principal species for which plans were developed were winter 
flounder, summer flounder, weakfish, striped bass, and Atlantic groundfish species (cod, haddock, 
yellowtail flounder). 

Habitat Conservation and Enhancement Program. Program staff perform environmental review 
studies on proposed projects and also serve as advisors to the public. Staff reviewed and permitted 
over 200 applications, project proposals and resource inventories. Staff assisted in the monitoring of 
contaminants in the aquatic environment, notably dioxin; investigated fish kills; and cataloged and 
inspected site conditions of 129 permit applications for introduction of sterile grass carp. A pond 
management pamphlet was completed; over 230 consultations with the public on issues of stream, 
pond, and estuary habitat conservation and enhancement were done; technical guidance to three 
estuary protection committees and boards was provided; and information was gathered for press 
distribution. 

The Wildlife Division maintains stable and healthy wildlife populations in numbers compatible 
with existing land-use practices and carrying capacity. 

Nonharvested Wildlife Program. Inventory of the bog turtle and Puritan tiger beetle continued; a 
project to inventory dwarf wedge mussels was initiated. Federally funded management and research 
on the piping plover and roseate tern continued. Regulations and guidelines were provided for the 
wintering bald eagle observation area in Southbury, and the state's first eagle nesting area in 40 years, 
located in Barkhamsted. "Windows to Wildlife" provided technical assistance and materials for 
wildlife viewing opportunities at nursing homes. 

Waterfowl Program. Waterfowl population monitoring continued through spring breeding surveys 



260 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

and a survey of wintering populations. A special, late goose season was held for the sixth year. A 
project was begun to study Canada geese populations. 

White-tailed Deer Program. During the fall deer season, 56,984 permits were issued and a record 
1 1,31 1 deer were taken. The special antlerless season removed 1,125 deer. Under the Deer Damage 
Permit system, 242 commercial agriculturists experiencing crop damage harvested 762 deer. An 
additional 2,093 deer were killed on Connecticut roadways. An estimated 32,562 hunters were afield 
for 412,326 man-days, spending a projected $6.9 million. The 1991 post-season deer population 
estimate is 36,500. 

Wild Turkey Program. Turkey hunting was permitted during the spring gobbler and fall archery 
turkey seasons, with record harvests reported: 3,549 spring hunters took 788 gobblers; and 1 ,755 fall 
archers took 20 turkeys. The second fall firearms turkey season was held in northwestern Connecticut, 
resulting in a harvest of 34 birds by 514 hunters. The current population estimate is 7,000. 

Furbearer Program. The state's black bear population has increased. The first case of a vehicle- 
killed bear, a 300 pound adult male, occurred in December in Redding. Several bear attacks on 
livestock were also recorded. 

Radiotelemetry monitoring of reintroduced fishers concluded in FY92. Studied, radio-equipped 
fishers had no mortalities. Population monitoring will continue. 

Rabies has continued to spread in the raccoon population. Since the first reported case 1 1/2 years 
ago, 577 cases have been confirmed in the state, 94 percent of them in raccoons. Division personnel 
cooperated in public education and rabies management efforts. 

Upland Wildlife Program. Hunting effort and species harvests were monitored through hunter 
surveys. Program personnel assisted the United States Fish and Wildlife in a survey of breeding 
woodcock. 

Urban Wildlife Program. A backyard wildlife habitat demonstration site was developed; and a 
guide was published on the availability of native shrubs from DEP operated nurseries. 

Wildlife Recreation Management. In F Y92 33,186 ring -necked pheasants were released at hunting 
areas. A total of 15,562 pheasant tags were sold; 101,349 man-days were spent pheasant hunting. 
Hunting rights were maintained on 26 hunting areas totaling 41,151 acres. 

Habitat Management. Habitat management activities atstate Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) 
included brush clearing and mowing, managing water levels at wildlife impoundments and maintaining 
wood duck nest boxes. 

Technical Assistance. The division licensed 172 wildlife custodians who handled 9,062 injured or 
orphaned animals. Nuisance Wildlife Control (NWC) volunteers assisted 740 landowners, handling 
1,272 nuisance animals. The 127 licensed NWC operators assisted 2,101 clients, handling 4,542 
animals. Biologists provided technical assistance such as investigation of deer and beaver complaints, 
review of forestry cutting plans and inspection of agricultural agreements. 

Conservation Education/ Firearms Safety (CE/FS). A total of 5,528 students were enrolled in CE/ 
FS firearms, archery and trapping courses. The 315 volunteer instructors donated 16,235 hours of 
time. 

Public Awareness. The public awareness program produced 25 news releases and distributed 
27,000 copies of the division's bimonthly publication, SCOPE. 

CEDARS Center. The division's Burlington office moved into the new Conservation Education, 
Demonstration and Recreation Site (CEDARS) building at Sessions Woods Wildlife Management 
Area. 

Indian Affairs. In FY92 casino operations began on the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation. Other 
tribes inquired about providing legalized gambling on their reservations. DEP provides technical 
assistance to the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe regarding compliance with governmental standards on 
waste, air and water issues; DEP receives financial reimbursement for its assistance. 

Forestry Division 

The Division of Forestry assists in the management and protection of Connecticut's forest 
resources. State Forest Nursery. Approximately 1 .2 million seedlings were shipped from the Pachaug 
State Forest Nursery. A surplus of 48,000 seedlings were available for Arbor Day programs. It was 
the second year of sales for the Homesteader package which features five options of species mixes. 
The program sold 2,633 packets, an increase of over 50 percent from last year. Revenue from nursery 
sales was up 8.7 percent to $129,362. 

Forest Fire Prevention and Control. The 1992 fire year showed a below average number of fire 
occurrences, and a below average number of acres burned. The mid-March through mid-May 1992 
fire season was below average. Cooler than normal temperatures and regular showers left ground fuels 
damper than usual. Fire prevention programs were presented in 57 towns/locations during the year. 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 261 

DEP Fire Control Officers trained 1,206 fire fighters from 39 departments in fire behavior and related 
skills. Over 120 young people were given similar training. DEP Personnel were trained in basic fire 
fighting techniques. In addition, 21 personnel were trained in nationally recognized programs. 
Personnel attended forest fire prevention training in cooperation with the Northeast Forest Fire 
Protection Commission. Foresters and Fire Control personnel trained with the National Guard on sky- 
crane water drop technique. 

Rural Community Fire Protection (RCFP). Federal Cost Sharing Funds totaling $25,000 were 
passed to 26 rural volunteer fire departments. The funds were used to purchase and repair equipment, 
or to provide training to fire fighters. Jane L. Goodwin Conservation Center. In FY92 presentations 
and workshops were attended by 3,400 people. School field trips and planning assistance were 
provided to groups at the Center. Work with EarthCare, of Hampton, resulted in the production of 
"Reusables," aregional publication distributed in Northeastern Connecticut to encourage solid waste 
reduction. Eagle Scout projects included a campfire wood shelter, wildlife observation blind, and 
wildlife habitat structure construction. The Center coordinated a statewide Arbor Day poster contest 
and distributed 13,750 tree seedlings to 215 schools. Municipalities received 25,000 tree seedlings 
for Arbor Day celebrations. The center planned the wildlife information and testing segment of the 
first Connecticut Envirothon contest. Foresters drafted comprehensive plans of management for 
3,649 acres of State Forest. Forest management yielded 3.6 million board feet of sawtimber, worth 
$409,378.14. Construction of 3,600 feet of woodland access roads and the clearing and re- 
identification of 44 miles of boundary line facilitated forest management. Public interest in Lottery 
fuelwood permits declined. The division provided 1,490 cords of wood to the public via the cordwood 
lottery, yielding $14,900 in revenue. Miscellaneous forest products revenue decreased by 25 percent 
from last year. The forest products exchange program continued. The agency received 220 cubic yards 
of gravel, roadwork to improve access to the forest, and 135,000 board feet of lumber and logs. 

Cooperative Forest Management (CFM). Foresters provide technical advice to private Woodland 
owners, municipalities and others. In FY92 division foresters wrote management plans for 62 
woodland owners with a total of 6,598 acres. An additional 14,249 acres were examined, and 73 
landowners were referred to private forestry consultants for additional assistance. The "Stewardship" 
program for nonindustrial private forestland owners is a multi-disciplinary approach to forest 
management. Management plans include recommendations on habitat enhancement, soil and water 
protection, recreation and aesthetics, and wood fiber production. Urban Forestry. New partnerships 
have been formed with the Connecticut Botanical Society to computerize the Connecticut Large and 
Notable Tree Inventory, and with the University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension System to 
coordinate volunteer tree planting efforts throughout the state. The Small Business Administration 
provided $383,500 for tree planting in 32 communities and three state parks. These funds were 
matched by over $440,000 of in-kind services and funds. An additional $55,500 for tree planting and 
$75,000 for special projects was awarded by the United States Forest Service. A three day workshop 
was held to train volunteers in a tree care program. The urban forester provides technical assistance 
to communities upon request. Field staff provide assistance to 40 communities. 

Forest Land Tax Law. Certification of forest land for tax purposes continued. There were 19,627 
acres added to the program under 318 new certificates, and 105 amendment additions. Over 200 
certificates were canceled and acreage was reduced under 129 amendments, resulting in the loss of 
18,970 acres from the program. The total area of designated forestland to 657,650.5 acres, under 8,606 
active certificates. Market development efforts continued through NEWPEX, Inc., at the Northeastern 
Wood Products Exposition in Springfield, MA. Federal cost sharing money went to three Connecticut 
firms to assist in their marketing efforts. A native lumber stamping program will allow more locally 
produced lumber into the Connecticut construction industry. 

Law Enforcement. The Law Enforcement Division plans, organizes, supervises, and implements 
policies governing wildlife, boating, shellfishing, commercial fishing and park law enforcement. It 
also provides technical advice and training to other law enforcement officers. The present force 
consists of 46 conservation officers and nine park police officers. 

Wildlife enforcement ensures compliance with laws and regulations concerning harvesting and 
control of all wildlife including shellfish; and all fish taken by non-commercial methods. 

Boating enforcement responsibilities include administering the state's boating safety program, 
investigating boating accidents, coordinating boating safety enforcement with state, federal and local 
authorities, and providing boating safety patrols at special events. 

Commercial fishing enforcement ensures compliance with laws and regulations governing the 
commercial taking, possessing and selling of marine finfish, shellfish, and Crustacea. Recreational 
law enforcement trained and supervised 120 officers who patrolled state park and forest recreation 
areas. A program requiring 500 hours of block training was initiated in conjunction with the Municipal 



262 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

Police Training Council and State Police. 

In FY92 recreational law enforcement officers and conservation officers received training in 1 3 law 
enforcement topics. Conservation law enforcement arrests in FY92 were 3,838; warnings were 1, 15 1 . 
Recreational law enforcement officer arrests were 1,897; warnings were 1,293. Turn-in-Poachers 
(TIP) received a total of 1,157 complaints, and 177 arrests were made as a result. 

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation 
State Parks Division 

Park attendance increased 5 .5 percent from last year to 7 .05 million visitors. An out-of-state vehicle 
parking fee and increased camping fees contributed to an 1 1 percent increase in park and forest 
revenues, which exceeded $3.1 million. 

Park master plans were completed in FY92 for Fort Griswold, the Norwalk Heritage Park, the 
Windham Heritage Park and the Windsor Locks Rapids Exhibit Center. Master plans are in progress 
for Putnam Memorial, Dinosaur State Park and the Thames Estuary Heritage Park Visitors' Center. 

The Standardized Park Architecture capital project has been adopted to create a standard design for 
six building types in State Parks and Forests. 

Various volunteer groups provided assistance with hiking trails, gardening, visitor services, special 
programs, fund raising and other activities. The Department of Correction Inmate Work Program, 
court ordered public service, and the Alternative Incarceration Center program provided over 1 1 ,000 
hours of maintenance and project work. 

In FY 92 the State Parks Division hired 98 lifeguards. Through a loan agreement with several 
watercraft companies, the three major shore parks each have a watercraft to use in their waterfront 
safety and rescue programs. 

Field Services and Boating Division 

The Field Services and Boating Division improves and repairs over 700 buildings, 500 miles of 
roads, 200 acres of parking lots, 108 boating access areas, 150 dams and other structures. It provides 
technical review and engineering services; fiscal, clerical and budgeting services; purchasing and 
maintenance of equipment and management of a statewide boating safety program. Renovations were 
completed on five boating access areas and minor repairs done at 26 others. 

A new Marine Headquarters in Old Lyme was completed and opened. It includes an office building, 
maintenance buildings, docking facilities and classroom/teaching facilities. In addition, public 
fishing on the Connecticut River is provided along a 1,000 foot boardwalk. Docking, pump-out and 
seasonal toilets are also available. 

Hurricane Bob caused $225,225 worth of damage to agency facilities and grounds at 22 sites. 
Cleanup and repair costs were reimbursed through the Federal Emergency Management Agency. 

A total of 250 boating safety classes graduated 3,600 students. The boating safety "equivalency 
exam" has been designed, tested and is ready for use by the Department of Motor Vehicles. 

Design work began on the renovation of Stratton Brook State Park. Upon completion of 
renovations, the park will be totally handicapped accessible. 

Outdoor Recreation Planning 

The Outdoor Recreation Planning Section was transferred to the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation. 
This unit serves the branch in meeting its planning needs and setting its recreation goals. 

The Connecticut Recreation and Natural Heritage Trust Program, enacted by the legislature, allows 
the state and municipalities to protect open space, and natural and historically significant land through 
acquisition. Outdoor Recreation Planning assisted in preparing management plans and reviews final 
documents for compliance with DEP and Trust policies. Management plans have been completed for 
Wilton, Trumbull, Bloomfield, South Windsor, Branford, and Rocky Hill. 

The State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) is a requirement of the National 
Parks Service, enabling the state to qualify for grants from the Land and Water Conservation fund and 
other programs. The plan sets public recreation goals and priorities. SCORP studies include the 
Municipal Recreation Survey, State Parks and Recreation Survey and Public Preference Survey. 

The data processing unit provides services and computer assisted drawings to the branch. Major 
programs were written to provide financial tracking; parkrevenue accounting; land acquisition record 
keeping and grant award tracking. Computer assisted drawings were produced for survey crews, 
public presentations, trail brochures, rabies tracking and law enforcement patrol zones. 

In 1992 Outdoor Recreation Planning administered grant programs for the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund; the Connecticut Outdoor Recreation Fund; and the Legislative Special Act. 

The state Office of Policy & Management requires land purchases and exchanges be reviewed for 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 263 

compliance with goals and priorities in SCORP. A SCORP review system, including input from other 
resource units, was established. Reviews included 75 property exchanges and 50 potential acquisi- 
tions. 

To comply with regulations of the United States Forest Service, the Division of Forestry began 
preparation of a long-range plan. The plan, which requires public input, will entitle DEP to receive 
federal funds. 

Division of Land Acquisition and Management 

In FY92 the major source of funding for general open space acquisition was the State Bond Fund, 
under the Recreation and Natural Heritage Trust Program (RNHTP). Under the program's review 
system, 100 projects were considered for acquisition. More than half will not be considered as 
potential future acquisitions. An active list of 100 potential acquisition projects was carried over to 
FY93. 

Division staff completed 1 1 RNHTP acquisitions, acquiring ownership to 562 acres and acquiring 
development rights to 142.25 acres, at a total cost of $3.2 million. Among the transactions were two 
acquisitions completed with assistance from the Algonquin Gas and Iroquois Gas Transmission 
Companies, through compensation agreements. 

The division received Bond Commission approval for 17 projects encompassing 3,550 acres at a 
projected cost of $9.6 million. Commitments were obtained for two land gifts under the RNHTP. 

As additions to two state parks, gifts totalling 27 acres were received. The Piper Mill Flood Control 
project used state Bond funds to complete seven transactions. The Department of Housing approved 
a relocation program in connection with the Yantic River Flood Control Project in Norwich and 
Franklin. 

The Property Management Review Team evaluated 49 new proposals for management regarding 
DEP land issues; included were easements, pipeline rights-of-way, exchanges, leases, and other 
agreements. Property management staff completed 88 transactions during FY92. Gas pipeline 
agreements involved negotiation over fees, and easements through DEP lands by the Iroquois and 
AlgonquinGas Transmission System Companies. As aresultof those agreements, thegas transmission 
companies compensated DEP for loss of land by assisting in, and setting aside funds for, additions 
to DEP holdings. 

The Municipal Grant Program is a competitive reimbursement program assisting municipalities in 
acquiring and/or developing outdoor recreation facilities . The program derives funds from the Federal 
Land and Water Conservation Fund and the Connecticut Outdoor Recreation Fund. In FY92 SI. 9 
million in grant funding was awarded. 

Combined federal apportionments totalling S8 18,943 for FY92, led to seven grants. The largest of 
these grants went to the state for the acquisition of the Rachbauer Estate. 

No new funds under the Connecticut Outdoor Recreation Fund were authorized by the legislature 
for FY92. However, cost savings on previously awarded projects, and canceled projects resulted in 
reallocation of SI million. In FY92, 13 municipal projects received grants using previously authorized 
funds. 

There are currently 78 active reimbursement projects in 50 municipalities totalling a net worth of 
S28 million; 12 involve federal funds. State apportionment to these 78 projects totals approximately 
$10 million. 

A Special Grant of $35,000 was awarded to the City of Bristol to subsidize construction of an indoor 
pool at the Little League Baseball Eastern Regional Headquarters. Work continues on 66 active 100 
percentreimbursement projects from previous authorizations. These projects involve 28 municipalities 
with an anticipated total cost to the state of $38 million. 

Branch of Environmental Quality 

Robert E. Moore, Deputy Commissioner 
Bureau of Water Management 

During FY92, the Planning and Standards Division completed revisions to State Water Quality 
Standards. Changes included adoption of numeric water quality criteria for over 100 individual toxic 
pollutants and identification of procedures to implement anti-degredation provisions. The changes 
strengthen state and federal Clean Water Act goals. 

Planning and Standards supports the Engineering and Enforcement Division by developing permit 
limits and conditions, and monitoring requirements for chemicals known or suspected to be toxic to 
humans or aquatic life. The water Toxics Program maintains a laboratory, providing whole effluent 
toxicity monitoring of waste water discharges. 

The division administered lake management projects authorized by four Special Acts and six state 



264 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

grant projects. The division updated handbooks and provided technical support to numerous interests 
on lake and watershed management. A grant application to fund watershed management at public 
lakes was submitted to EPA. Restoration projects were completed at Lake Waramaug, Candlewood 
Lake, 1860 Reservoir and Bantam Lake, with planning for Silver Lake restoration being continued. 

Ambient water quality monitoring continued with 27 fixed stations sampled for physical and 
chemical water quality parameters. The fourth year of a five year statewide survey of fish tissue 
contamination was completed. A report was submitted to the General Assembly on dioxin and 
dibenzofuran concentrations in water sediments, fish and soils near resource recovery facilities . Other 
water quality and biological monitoring was performed in lakes, rivers, estuaries and harbors. 

Wasteload allocation (WLA) studies continued for determining treatment levels for water quality 
problems resulting from discharges of treated municipal or industrial wastes. Data was gathered for 
the Quinnipiac and Naugatuck Rivers to support development of WLAs for heavy metals discharged 
to these waters. Intensive monitoring and computer modeling were done at Black Rock Harbor, 
Bridgeport Harbor, Long Island Sound, Norwalk Harbor, Stamford Harbor, the Willimantic River and 
the Thames River Estuary. Public hearings were held on the Stamford Harbor, Norwalk Harbor and 
Willimantic River WLAs. 

Development of LIS computer models to identify corrective methods for the Sound's hypoxia 
problem remained a DEP priority. River, rainfall and sewage treatment plant monitoring provided 
data for water quality modeling. The division provided technical support toward developing a 
Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for LIS, recommending ways to manage 
hypoxia, toxics, pathogens, living marine resources and floatable debris. 

The "Connecticut Clean Water Fund" was created to financially assist municipalities with needed 
sewerage projects. Since 1987, the fund has received $395 million of State General Obligation Bonds, 
$300 million of Revenue Bond Authority and $ 122 million in federal funds through FY92. Currently, 
$299.8 million is obligated to 35 municipal projects. 

Engineering and Enforcement. The division regulates wastewater discharges from over 2,000 
industries and 200 public and private sewage treatment plants, and landfill and disposal activities. 
Permits, administrative orders, water supply orders, injunctions, civil and criminal penalties were all 
used to abate or prevent water pollution. Compliance of regulated facilities, monitoring, inspections 
and investigation of suspected pollution sources are critical support programs. 

This division also administers the state's potable water program. It responds to incidents of well 
contamination by providing bottled water as a temporary means of ensuring potable water and issues 
orders to the responsible parties requiring abatement of the source of pollution and replacement of the 
contaminated well with a permanent source of potable water. If a responsible party has no assets or 
cannot be identified, a state grant assists municipalities in covering 50 or 75 percent of the capital costs 
of water provision. 

In FY92, 60 Administrative Orders were issued to correct pollution problems, 193 National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and state permits were issued or renewed, seven 
permits and 18 orders were modified to correct pollution problems, four cases were referred to the 
Attorney General or State's Attorney, $360,450 in penalties were assessed, 906 compliance 
inspections were conducted at 356 industrial NPDES and state permittees and 120 sewage treatment 
facilities. 

The Municipal Facilities Section provides assistance to municipalities to plan, design, construct 
and operate sewerage treatment facilities. The section uses Connecticut's Clean Water Fund to aid 
municipalities in financing upgrades and construction of needed sewerage facilities. 

Inland Water Resources. The division has two sections, Rood Management and the Water and 
Related Wetlands Section. 

The Rood Management Section implements cooperative Flood Control and Shore Erosion Control 
programs and the state's Comprehensive Dam Safety Program. In FY92, this section implemented 19 
flood control projects, 25 dam repair projects, six beach, shore and erosion projects; it oversaw three 
private dam repair projects, one fisheries project, four dredging projects, and seven Soil Conservation 
Service flood control projects. The state-owned dam repair program repaired five dams; construction 
is pending on four dams, 13 more are under design. 

The Flood Management Section is a 14-year participant in the cooperative agreement under the 
National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Federal monies funded ordinance reviews and community 
assistance. Under NFIP, staff conducted four community educational workshops, provided assistance 
to municipalities on 25 projects and administered 10 grants for Natural Disaster Planning under the 
Hazard Mitigation Program. A presidential disaster declaration, due to Hurricane Bob, resulted in six 
hazard mitigation grants. 

The seven year-old Statewide Flood Warning System ( ASERT) operated at 1 00 percent efficiency. 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 265 

Through receipt of federal grants, the flood warning system will expand to five high hazard dams and 
the cities of Hartford and Milford. 

Dam inspectors completed 32 inspections. Enforcement of outstanding administrative orders 
continued as a priority, with progress made in securing repairs to unsafe dams. Efforts included 
reinspection and referral of delinquent repair orders to the Office of the Attorney General. 

In FY92, 38 construction permits were issued; 22 repair orders were issued on unsafe dams; 12 
certificates of approval were issued for completion of repairs; 32 construction permit need determinations 
were issued; 38 engineering/maintenance requests were issued; 15 inspections were performed in 
conjunction with the review of Phase II engineering reports; 64 dams were inspected for the regular 
inspection program; 63 dam inspections related to outstanding orders and repair requests were made; 
and 76 field visits to construction sites were completed. Also, 40 dams were inspected at the request 
of the public, 12 final construction inspections for certificates of approval were made; 33 State -owned 
flood control projects were inspected, and five dam owners were referred to the Attorney General's 
Office. 

The Water & Related Resources unit aims to achieve compliance with established wetland and 
water resource management standards for the development, use and allocation of water supply and 
water resources. 

A technical service and training program was provided to municipal inland wetland agencies which 
implement local inland wetlands regulatory programs. Approximately 500 municipal wetland 
commission members represented 1 15 towns at the courses. The unit helped 53 local wetland agencies 
evaluate 93 major wetland development projects. The division assisted municipal agencies in 
updating regulations. 

Municipalities report all regulatory decisions to the division, which used the information to 
establish a GIS data base. The data base will enable assessments of wetland losses on a local, 
watershed or statewide basis. A site review handbook for local land use decision makers was 
completed. A wetlands compensation policy to mitigate wetland impacts arising from state agency 
projects was established. Priority was given to assisting towns in implementing regulations to protect 
water resources. 

Through Inland Wetlands, Stream Channel Encroachment Line and Water Quality Certification 
Programs, DEP determines whether a proposed use is suitable for the land or waterway. Through the 
Water Diversion program, it allocates water supplies among competing uses. 

In FY92, the section received 200 permit applications; issued 161 permits; investigated 171 
complaints of violations and initiated 57 enforcement actions. The Inland Wetlands program received 
76 permit applications and acted on 71. The Stream Channel Encroachment Line Program, which 
oversees about 270 miles of flood prone rivers, received 44 permit applications and issued 59 permits. 
The Water Diversion Program received 35 applications and issued 17 permits. The Section reviewed 
26 Department of Transportation flood management certifications on bridge repair/replacement 
projects for hydraulic adequacy, reviewed 49 dam construction permit applications for wetlands 
impacts, approved 55 Bureau of Forestry tree cutting plans, received 45 applications for Clean Water 
Act Certifications and issued 14 certificates. 

Bureau of Air Management 

Engineering and Enforcement Division. Field Enforcement staff responded to over 1,067 com- 
plaints of odors and dust and performed approximately 540 federally mandated source inspections. 
In FY92, 1 1 gasoline storage facilities were inspected for Reid Vapor Pressure compliance. The 
Administrative Enforcement and New Source Review section prepared notices of violation, issued 
state orders and civil penalty assessments, and reviewed permits for new or modified sources. In 
FY92, 137 notices of violation and 87 new state orders were issued along with 36 civil penalties 
totaling $56,000. There were 350 applications for permits processed. Permit streamlining reduced the 
permit backlog by 25 percent. Open burning applications processed were 4,000. In addition, 50 
Continuous Emission Monitoring audits were performed. 

Planning and Standards. The division is responsible for developing the State Implementation Plan 
(SIP) required under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and has developed regulations required 
to achieve the plan's goals. The division also reviews the state transportation policy and coordinates 
with other agencies to reduce air pollution from transportation sources, including a program for 
reviewing air pollution impacts of new roads and major intersections. The division analyzes the 
effectiveness of the motor vehicle emissions testing program and is working with the Department of 
Motor Vehicles to develop an enhanced program as required by the Clean Air Act. It also plans 
programs controlling hazardous air pollutants and ozone-depleting chemicals such as chlorofluoro- 
carbons. 



266 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

Monitoring and Radiation. This unit operates 256 air monitoring, meteorological and telemetry 
instruments and microcomputers at 53 field locations. Staff selects, installs, operates, maintains and 
repairs the instruments, conducts a quality assurance program on the equipment and publishes an 
annual report of the state's air quality. The latest monitoring equipment was installed in the Hartford 
area to characterize the air during periods of high ozone. 

The Monitoring/Toxics Group increased its capacity to monitor hazardous air pollutants. Moni- 
toring was conducted at six project locations, collecting 1 64 samples and more than 3,600 data points, 
measuring 1 8 of the top 49 substances on the toxics prioritization list. Extensive monitoring for dioxin 
was conducted in and around the state's resources recovery facilities. More than 135 tests, protocols, 
and reports were completed for a variety of incinerators and emission sources. The unit maintained 
responsibility for coordinating support from private analytical laboratories and planning for future 
laboratory space. 

The Radiation Section of the Monitoring and Radiation Division controls users of radioactive 
materials, x-ray machines, and other radiation-producing devices. Over 400 environmental samples 
were collected from areas surrounding nuclear facilities and analyzed for exposure to radioactive 
releases. Radiation-measuring devices also ring each of the two nuclear power stations. Of the 7,700 
x-ray machines registered, 496 were inspected. The section also regulated the use of industrial x-ray 
facilities, as well as sources of non-ionizing radiation. 

The Radiation Section received 159 notifications of accidents or incidents involving radioactive 
materials. On-site response teams assessed environmental and public health effects of each incident 
and made recommendations. 

The Director of the Monitoring and Radiation Division represents the state on the Northeast Low- 
Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) Commission. The Radiation Section developed the program to 
oversee characterization of sites for LLRW which are selected by the Hazardous Waste Management 
Service. Annually, approximately 35,000 - 45,000 cubic feet of radioactive waste is shipped from 
Connecticut to commercially licensed facilities for disposal. The Radiation Section developed a 
program to regulate site construction and operation of an LLRW site in Connecticut. 

Bureau of Waste Management 

Planning and Standards. Grants totaling $3.7 million were awarded for development of recycling 
programs. 

Program Planning and Information Management. Staff processed 60,000 hazardous waste 
manifests and issued over 1,000 warning letters to sites failing to comply with manifesting 
requirements. DEP received EPA grant funding of $300,000 to develop a pollution prevention 
program. The bureau cosponsored a conference on environmental regulatory issues geared toward 
Connecticut's business community. 

Recycling. Connecticut municipalities, businesses and institutions expanded recycling, composting 
and source reduction programs. Intermediate processing centers in six regions recycled over 450 tons 
per day of glass, corrugated, metal and plastic containers. All municipalities have recycling programs 
in place. Leaf composting facilities capable of processing 634,000 cubic yards of leaves annually are 
registered or are in the process of being registered at 84 locations. Regional business recycling 
councils were established by five Chambers of Commerce using DEP grants. 

Cost Recovery. State- funded environmental spill cleanups occurred at 1 14 sites in Connecticut and 
cost $2.8 million. Recovered funds amounted to $231,218. Civil action referrals are expected to 
exceed $5 million. Engineering and Enforcement. Resources recovery facilities serve approximately 
1 14 towns, either through long-term contracts or short-term service agreements. Several towns have 
all or part of their solid waste disposed of by these systems on a daily or spot market basis. The long- 
term contracts serve a population of over two million. The state's sixth resources recovery facility, 
located in southeast Connecticut, became operational. Permit applications were reviewed and public 
hearings held on a proposed 425 tons per day resources recovery facility. A private, energy producing 
tire burning facility became operational and has a capacity to process over 10 million tires annually. 

Incinerator ash from resources recovery facilities, biomedical waste incinerators, and municipal 
solid waste incinerators is monitored continuously to detect hazardous contents. Ash residue is held 
at existing permitted landfills until lined landfills are developed. Permit application reviews for two 
lined facilities were completed; one application has been through the public hearing process, the 
second facilities' public hearing is scheduled for July. 

Solid Waste Landfill Permitting and Monitoring. There were 28 permits and/orpermit amendments 
issued for landfill and composting activities; 16 new applications were received. In addition, 18 
applications were received and 48 permits issued for other solid waste facilities. Water quality data 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 267 

from open and closed landfills across the state was received and reviewed. 

Special Waste. Over 500 special waste authorizations were granted for disposal of contaminated 
soils, industrial and special wastes, and asbestos. There are six Connecticut landfills permitted to 
accept asbestos waste. 

Solid Waste Inspections/ Enforcement. The bureau investigated 277 complaints. There were 32 
notices of violation issued, three cases were referred to the Attorney General for action, 25 orders were 
issued and $2.2 million in judicial penalties assessed, including $275,000 in corporate criminal fines. 
Two criminal cases were successfully prosecuted with a potential five year jail sentence pending. 

Biomedical Waste. Biomedical waste regulations are in effect. Staff positions were created to carry 
out a two-year pilot program to track medical waste handling. Hazardous Waste Permitting. 
Applications were reviewed for eight existing hazardous waste storage facilities with interim status, 
three of which are commercial facilities. There were 294 hazardous waste and Connecticut regulated 
waste transporter permits issued which resulted in $177,760 in permit fees. 

Hazardous Waste Inspections! Enforcement. The bureau conducted inspections of Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) notifiers including 58 land disposal facilities, 47 treatment 
and storage facilities, and 79 generators and transporters. There were 12 compliance inspections 
conducted and 202 general complaints investigated. There were 3 1 new administrative orders and 69 
notices of violation issued to facilities failing to comply with hazardous waste management 
regulations. In addition, 28 referrals were made to the Attorney General and $348,700 in forfeitures 
assessed against 11 handlers. 

Groundwater Monitoring and Closure. The bureau completed groundwater monitoring inspec- 
tions at 19 hazardous waste facilities during the past year. Closure plans were approved for four 
facilities. 

PesticideslPoly-chlorinated By phenyls (PCB) Management. There were 116 PCB inspections 
performed resulting in 37 state and federal enforcement actions. Over $196,000 in penalties were 
assessed. The bureau initiated eight PCB cleanup projects and completed 12, some from previous 
years. 

Pesticide Inspections/ Enforcement. The bureau conducted 650 inspections of pesticide applica- 
tors, distributors, and manufacturers, and 237 pesticide samples were taken for laboratory analysis. 
Staff responded to 228 complaints. A total of 220 enforcement actions were initiated; 14 cases were 
forwarded to the Attorney General and six forwarded for federal enforcement action. 

Marketplace Inspect ions/ Product Registration. All pesticides used, sold or distributed in Con- 
necticut must be registered with the DEP by their manufacturers. Marketplace inspectors determined 
productregistration status, storage and display, labeling violations, and collected samples. There were 
131 inspections completed during the year. There are 7,200 products registered. 

Permitting. There were 471 applications received for permission to apply chemicals to waters of 
the state, three aerial permits were issued. 

Applicator Certification. A total of 1,308 pesticide applicator examinations were given, 680 were 
certified. 

Oil and Chemical Spill Response. There were 5,913 reported spills and uncontrolled releases of 
petroleum and hazardous substances and 3,983 incidents were responded to for mitigation and 
cleanup activities. There were 21 courses on hazardous material recognition and spill response 
provided to local response organizations. 

Underground Storage Tanks (UST). The department enforces regulations for control of nonresi- 
dential underground storage of oil and petroleum and federal underground storage tank regulations 
for petroleum products and chemicals. The bureau administers the Leaking Underground Storage 
Tank (LUST) Trust Fund which uses federal funds to investigate and remediate groundwater 
contamination resulting from leaking underground tanks. Connecticut has 30,574 nonresidential oil 
and petroleum USTs registered. The UST program monitors tank removal, develops and maintains 
a database for USTs subject to registration requirements, and reviews closure plans and site 
restoration projects. 

The LUST Trust Fund Program received 684 reports of leaking tanks and utilized federal funds on 
21 sites to mitigate effects of gasoline contamination. Alternate drinking water was provided to 30 
homes with contaminated wells. Cost recovery actions were initiated at five sites. In addition, the 
LUST Trust Program investigated 54 sites. 

Property Transfer. State law requires reporting when a hazardous waste establishment undergoes 
a property transfer. There have been 1,341 filings, including 477 sites at which remedial action is 
needed, since enactment of the law in 1985. To date, seven sites have been remediated, and action is 
underway at 128 sites. 

Federal Superfund. The bureau is working under an $848,267 EPA grant for pre-remedial site 



268 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

investigations at potential Superfund sites and is participating in federal remedial actions at the 15 
National Priority List sites under a $303,150 grant. The bureau worked under a $1.16 million EPA 
grant to support activities for pre-remedial and remedial site activities. This grant also included 
funding for GIS data collection and project tracking. 

State superfund remedial action is proceeding at six sites; two remedial investigations and one 
remedial design were completed. Remedial action commenced at one site. Responsible party funded 
remedial action was ongoing at 49 hazardous waste sites on the state Inventory of Hazardous Waste 
Disposal Sites. 

Inventory. At the end of FY91, the Inventory of Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites listed 586 sites 
where hazardous waste may have been disposed; with 24 sites being added to the Inventory this past 
year, the total is 610. Assessments were done at 598 sites to date, and 19 remediation orders were 
issued to sites on the Inventory during the past year. 

Economic Development Incentive. The bureau is working with the Department of Economic 
Development on the investigation and cleanup of three high priority economic development sites. 



Council on Environmental Quality 

KARL J. WAGENER, Executive Director 

Established - 1971 Statutory authority - Sec. 22a-ll 

Central office - 165 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 2 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $65,036 



The Council on Environmental Quality ' s three primary responsibilities are to prepare and submit 
an annual report to the Governor on the status of Connecticut's environment; to review 
construction projects of state agencies; and to receive and investigate citizen complaints. The council 
is within the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for administrative purposes only. 

Members of the nine-person council are appointed by the Governor, Speaker of the House and 
President Pro Tempore of the Senate. Members serve without compensation. The council met 
monthly in 1991-92 as required by law, and subcommittees held additional meetings. The 1991 
Annual Report was the council's 20th anniversary issue, and included an expanded overview of two 
decades of environmental progress in Connecticut. The report also recommended that Connecticut 
embark on an ambitious program to establish greenways, which are linear parcels of open space that 
link together points of interest and make outdoor recreation readily available to everyone. With 
executive Order Number Eight, in May 1992, Governor Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. created The 
Greenways Committee, which the council staffed through the end of 1992. The council reviews all 
Environmental Impact Evaluations (EIE) and Findings of No Significant Impact (FNSI) produced for 
state agencies' construction projects under the Connecticut Environmental Policy Act. In 1987, the 
council started a scoring system to evaluate all EIEs and FNSIs. Council staff rated and commented 
on all EIEs and FNSIs received in 1991-92. 

The council received hundreds of calls regarding environmental problems, most of which were 
referred to the appropriate unit of the DEP when possible. Approximately 45 complaints required 
substantial investigation. In several cases, the council invited concerned citizens and relevant state 
and local officials to speak at council meetings. Council staff responded to 100 percent of complaints 
received, and was able to obtain some satisfactory action for the majority of complaints. Council staff 
also responded to hundreds of requests for information from citizens and the news media. 




AGRICULTURE 



Department of Agriculture 

JOHN R. H. BLUM, Commissioner 

John J. Filchak., Ill, Deputy Commissioner 

Established - 1971 Statutory authority - Sec. 22-1 

Central office - 165 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106 

Average number of full-time employees - 84 

Recurring operating expenses - 1991-92 - $3,671,352 

Capital outlay - $1,300 

Organization structure - Office of Commissioner, Administration: Farmland 

Preservation, Aquaculture, Marketing and Technology, and 

Regulation and Inspection 

CONNECTICUT 

GROWN 



The Department of Agriculture is charged by the Connecticut General Assembly with the 
responsibility of promoting the development and expansion of food and agriculture systems 
within the state, disseminating information concerning new product technologies and techniques 
being used in food and agricultural production processing and distribution systems, protecting the 
wholesomeness and safety of the fresh food supply for all citizens, safeguarding the health and welfare 
of animal and plant-based agricultural systems and preserving the agricultural resources of the state, 
both land and sea. 

The mission of the department is carried out through its several bureaus: 

The Bureau of Administrative Services is responsible for overall agency management, preparation 
and control of the agency budget. 

The Bureau of Regulation and Inspection 18 responsible for carrying out all regulatory and 
enforcement responsibilities of the department. 

The Bureau of Land and Agricultural Resources is responsible for the protection and preservation 
of farm land, development of aquaculture, management of state shellfish grounds and the overall 
protection and enhancement of the state's agricultural resources. 

The Bureau of Technology and Marketing Development 1 8 responsible for the development and 
expansion of agriculture in the state. 

Farmland Preservation 

The Farmland Preservation Unit's primary responsibility is the preservation of farmland through 
the acquisition of development rights. The legislature has authorized a total of $66.25 million for the 
program since 1978. A total of 19 ,820 acres of farmland on 137 farms were preserved by development 
rights acquisition by June 30, 1992. Development rights to ten farms with 1,000 acres were purchased 
for $4,569 million in fiscal year 1991-92. On June 30, 1992, there were approximately 100 active 
applications to the preservation program. The Farmland Preservation Unit is also responsible for the 
department's activities relating to land use and environmental concerns that impact farmland. A brief 
description of these activities in fiscal year 1991-92 follows: 

Property management of development rights restricted farmlands ; 32 properties inspected with 
three requiring enforcement activities with the Attorney General's Office; Reviews of farm building 
construction plans on restricted farmland - 5; Property boundary surveys - 10. 

Review of government funded projects for impacts on agricultural lands; 1 6 projects reviewed for 
Department of Transportation, office of Policy and Management, Department of Economic Devel- 
opment and Department of Housing valued at more than $20 million. 

Review and impact statement for the proposed low level nuclear waste disposal sites 

Assist state agencies in updating conservation and development plans 

Review of proposed acquisitions by the Department of Environmental Protection (25 projects) 



270 



AGRICULTURE 271 



Assist in the management of the leases of state owned farmland (1,500 acres) 

Assist with the promotion and proper utilization of P. A. 490 agricultural use (4 municipalities and 

12 landowners assisted) 

Agency liaison on environmental land use issues with Department of Environmental Protection, 

United States Department of Agriculture and Environmental Protection Agency. 

Bureau of Marketing and Technology 

The objective of the Bureau of Marketing and Technology 1 8 to foster the expansion and stability 
of Connecticut agriculture here in the state, regionally, nationally and internationally. 

The bureau encourages the development and expansion of markets for Connecticut agricultural 
products by assisting in new business recruitment and development and assisting in cooperative 
promotion with commodity groups and farm industries to maintain profitability and an economic 
advantage in the marketplace. 

The bureau provides services by bringing together producers and those who sell agricultural 
products to expand markets for Connecticut grown products; applying for and administering various 
grant programs for the attainment of the objective of the bureau; administering the Farmers' Market 
Coupon Program for WIC eligible recipients and seniors; inspection and regulation of fresh produce 
at retail, wholesale and for sale to state institutions to ensure that state and federal standards are met; 
promoting Connecticut agricultural products by way of agency produced publications and media 
relations; and assisting producers in understanding new technologies that will enhance production and 
product sales. 

During the 199 1-92 fiscal year, the bureau was involved in a variety of specific projects, including: 

• The expansion of farmers' markets to a total of 36 across the state (a 16 percent increase); 

• The coordination of the annual Farm/City event in New London which drew more than 4,000 pre- 
school to sixth grade students from urban school systems; 

• The continuation of the Joint Venture Program to promote and enhance Connecticut Grown 
products. A total of $15,000 in state funds were expended with 12 commodity groups participating; 

• The continuation of the Connecticut Quality Seal Program which seeks to enhance the sale of 
Connecticut produced agricultural products that are meeting higher than the minimum USDA 
standards. A total of five commodities and 47 producers participated in this program; 

• The Farmers' Market Coupon Program completed its third year of operation. This program, which 
provides fresh fruits and vegetables to people in need, has two components. The first is a joint project 
with the federal government that serves WIC eligible recipients on a three to one match with the state. 
The federal contribution in 1991 was $243,151 and the state contributed $80,000. The second 
component of the program is funded by the state and private concerns serving eligible seniors. The 
state contributed $17,000 to this program. A total of 130 farmers participated in the program at 32 
certified farmers' market locations. A total of 43,000 persons were eligible to participate in the 
program and 62 percent of these people did participate. 

• The bureau was awarded a two-year grant through USDA's Federal-State Marketing Improve- 
ment Program (FSMIP) for $100,000 to establish a specialty food and beverage association. The State 
has provided in-kind services to match the federal funds. As of June 1992, the Connecticut Specialty 
Food and Beverage Association had recruited 102 members. During the past two years, the 
association has held 12 seminars to benefit small food producers, participated in more than 30 trade 
shows around the state, published a bi-monthly newsletter, produced a resource book for the trade and 
a membership directory. 

• The bureau was awarded, for the second year, the USDA Four State Regional Market Research 
Project Grant for $45,000 to administer a four-state (Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont and New 
Hampshire) regional market research project designed to improve wholesale marketing opportunities 
for fruit and vegetable growers located in the Connecticut River Valley of New England. 

A United States Department of Agriculture grant of $30,000 was secured to study consumer 
attitudes towards aquacultured Long Island Sound shellfish. Two major goals to be achieved are to 
identify consumer perceptions influencing their willingness to buy Long Island Sound shellfish and 
to develop a public awareness program to increase the desirability of Long Island Sound. 

• The bureau conducted 1,430 inspections and 68 re-inspections of packing, wholesale and retail 
establishments selling fresh fruits and vegetables, including sales to state institutions. Additionally, 
41 inspections of Controlled Atmosphere storage facilities were conducted by the bureau. 

The bureau also publishes the Connecticut Weekly Agriculture Report that provides subscribers 
with weekly commodity pricing information and news about agriculture in Connecticut. Total 
revenue generated by this publication was $42,529 with a total of 2,731 subscribers for 1991. 



272 AGRICULTURE 



Bureau of Regulation and Inspection 

The objective of the Bureau of Regulation and Inspection 1 8 to assure the citizens of a wholesome 
and safe supply of agricultural products through the inspection and monitoring of agricultural 
producers and processors selling and distributing their agricultural products in Connecticut. To 
control diseases of animals and poultry which endanger public health, and prevent the spread of 
contagious diseases to the 

Regulation and Inspection includes the inspection and enforcement of laws and regulations 
pertaining to the production, processing and distribution of milk and milk products, prevention, 
control and eradication of diseases of domestic animals, inspection of feed, seeds and fertilizer, 
inspection of canine-related facilities and supporting local officials in licensing and control of dogs. 

The Agricultural Commodities section enforces truth-in-labeling laws through a program of label 
review, inspection, sampling and laboratory analysis of animal feeds, seeds and fertilizer. The section 
also enforces the federal shell egg surveillance laws, frozen poultry inspection for the federal school 
lunch program and poultry test weighing through a cooperative agreement with the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

The Dairy Division is responsible for the regulation of milk producers, processors and distributors 
to provide the public with an adequate and safe supply of milk and milk products . The division inspects 
all farms, dairy plants, cheese manufacturers, bulk milk haulers and milk stores supplying milk to the 
citizens of our state. The division also conducts regular sampling and testing of milk and milk products 
from milk processors to ensure quality standards. 

The Connecticut Minimum Milk Premium program, enacted by the General Assembly and 
administered by the department, paid $1.9 million in additional monetary payments to Connecticut 
Dairy farmers from June through October 1991. These funds were paid to farmers during a time of 
severely depressed Federal Milk Order prices. 

The Livestock Division is responsible for the prevention and control of animal diseases by 
inspecting and testing livestock on farms to detect contagious and infectious diseases. Regulatory 
programs conducted by the division include mastitis testing and prevention in dairy cattle; tuberculosis 
testing, brucellosis testing, and calfhood vaccination for brucellosis in cattle; brucellosis and 
pseudorabies testing in swine: testing for equine infectious anemia in horses: and testing forpullorum- 
typhoid, avian influenza, salmonella and other infectious diseases of poultry. 

The state veterinarian acts as the official epidemiologist for animal and poultry diseases, 
coordinates state and federal governmental agencies and livestock producers to control diseases, and 
oversees and guides the development and management of disease control programs performed by the 
agency. 

The division is also responsible for regulating the import and export of healthy livestock and 
poultry, the licensing of cattle and swine dealers, livestock commission sales, garbage-feeding swine 
farms and fur breeders. 

The Canine Control Division has the responsibility of enforcing and providing support and 
assistance to all municipalities of the state in the enforcement of all regulations concerning dogs. The 
expenses incurred by the division are reimbursed from license funds in the custody of the State 
Treasurer received from the several municipalities and from the commissioner. 

A total of 92 claims for domestic dog damage to livestock were investigated and 26 were approved 
with reimbursement from the dog fund totalling $5,855.80. 

In 1991, the first confirmed case of racoon-carried "Mid- Atlantic" strain rabies was reported in 
Connecticut. Since that time, further cases have been reported, and it is expected that the epidemic 
will rapidly spread among the racoon population. In view of the threat to human life, the Legislature 
enacted a law requiring rabies vaccinations of cats in addition to dogs, already so mandated. The 
department acts as the lead agency in the state's efforts to deal with the rabies situation. The Director 
of the Inspection and Regulation Bureau serves as the Chairman of the Rabies Advisory Council 
which is made up of pertinent public and private officials to advise the state on how best to respond 
to the rabies problem. 

Aquaculture 

The State Shellfish Commission, established in 1881, subsequently became the Aquaculture 
Division, formed within the Department of Agriculture to manage and regulate shellfishing activities 
in Connecticut. 

The Aquaculture Division program provides for the testing of shellfish and shellfishing waters to 
protect public health, the leasing of submerged land to shellfishermen for the cultivating of shellfish, 



AGRICULTURE 



273 



'■ 




Statistical data from the Bureau of Regulation 


and Inspection 


Agricultural Commodities 




Feed, Seed & Fertilizer inspections 


307 


Feed, Seed & Fertilizer samples 


955 


tested. 




Feed, Seed & Fertilizer violations 


1,112 


noted. 




Feed product registrations. 


4,274 


Seed company registrations. 


82 


Fertilizer element registrations. 


4,077 


Dairy & Livestock 




CT. dairy farms inspected. 


356 


Total dairy farms and plants 


2,023 


inspected, including out-of- 




state dairy farms and plants 




Dairy reinspections for enforcement 


279 


action. 




Livestock tested for infections 


28,348 


diseases. 




Poultry inspected for infectious 


126,473 


diseases. 




Testing of dairy herds for 


195 


detection of mastitis. 




Testing of milk from cows for 


62,000 


detection of mastitis 




Environmental cultures of poultry 


1,643 


farms for salmonella 




Canine Control 




Number of stray dogs impounded by 


22,424 


municipal animal control officers 




Number of dogs redeemed by owners 


12,380 


Number of dogs eunthanized 


3,227 


Number of dogs sold as pets 


6,817 


Number of dogs licensed by 




town clerks 




Kennels licensed 




Pet shops licensed 


163 


Grooming facilities licensed 


234 


Commercial boarding kennels 


185 


licensed 




Training facilities licensed 


17 


Dog bites investigated 





managing shellfish spawning sanctuaries and cultivation of oyster seedbeds and issuing licenses for 
commercial shellfishing operations. 

The division administers over 41,000 acres of leased, franchised and natural shellfish grounds. 

All records of title, tax lists and detailed maps of shellfish grounds, as well as pamphlets relating 
to laws, culture and statistics are available at the division's facility in Milford. 

At the Milford location, the State Dock, an office and workshop support the year-round activities 
of the department's 50 ft. research boat "Yankee Oyster". The boat is used for survey work, setting 
buoys, collecting samples, maintenance of signals, patrolling for shellfish law violators, research for 
predator control and natural shellfish bed rehabilitation. The Aquaculture Division works in close 
cooperation with State and Federal health agencies to monitor water pollution control and protect the 
shellfish and their habitat in Long Island Sound and its estuaries. Over 7,400 seawater samples were 
collected during fiscal year 1991-1992. 



274 AGRICULTURE 



The Connecticut aquaculture industry continues to thrive and prosper; producing the finest quality 
and highest value oysters in the country. 

During the past fiscal year, over 1,500 acres of new leases were granted for the cultivation of 
shellfish. 

The Aquaculture Division issued 222 personal licenses and 117 boat licenses to individuals 
harvesting the state natural beds. In addition, 41 licenses were issued for the commercial harvesting 
of conchs this past year. 

The Aquaculture Division's program to restore the state -owned public oyster beds is well 
underway. To date nearly 4 million bushel of oyster shells have been planted. The clean shell or 
"culch" provides an attachment surface for the oyster larvae to fasten and grow. This highly effective 
procedure is a form of aquaculture or sea farming. The cultch was planted on the state beds with the 
assistance of the shellfish industry. 

Expansion of Connecticut's aquaculture program results in increased employment opportunities 
and the enhancement of our valuable natural resources for the benefit of all Connecticut citizens. 

Affirmative Action 

The Department of Agriculture is firmly committed to the ideals and objectives of affirmative 
action, and continues to provide equal opportunities to all persons in every aspect of employment 
including: recruitment, selection, training, counseling, classification and benefits. During the 1991- 
92 fiscal year, one permanent full-time employee was hired: one male. The agency promoted one 
individual: one male. At the end of the fiscal year, the department employed 74 full-time permanent 
employees, 43 percent of whom were women and minority group members. This includes the 
Connecticut Marketing Authority. The department's affirmative action plan has been approved by the 
Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. 

Regional Market 

The Regional Market, located in Hartford, is the largest food terminal between Boston and New 
York. It grosses approximately $165 million in sales per year. It is a state -owned, self liquidating and 
non-profit facility. The Regional Market provides a central location for wholesalers and Connecticut 
farmers to sell their products. The market is under the Department of Agriculture for administrative 
purposes only and is run by the Connecticut Marketing Authority. The Regional Market houses 15 
private wholesale food distribution firms; and has a total l